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South Korea investigates capsized ferry crew as rescue hampered by tides

6:59am BST

MOKPO/JINDO, South Korea - Strong tides and murky waters off South Korea's southwest coast were hampering efforts on Friday to find survivors from a ferry accident over 48 hours previously that left hundreds of passengers missing, most of them high school students. | Video

Four-way talks call for end to Ukraine violence

4:17am BST

GENEVA/MOSCOW - The United States, Russia, Ukraine and the European Union called after crisis talks on Thursday for an immediate halt to violence in Ukraine, where Western powers believe Russia is fomenting a pro-Russian separatist movement. | Video

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Still no success as deep-sea drone searches for MH370

3:46am BST

PERTH, Australia - Hopes that a deep sea drone scouring the Indian Ocean floor might soon turn up a missing Malaysian jetliner were fading on Friday, as the remote-controlled submarine embarked on a fifth mission with still no sign of wreckage.

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Students add Easter twist to dwindling Venezuela protests

12:26am BST

CARACAS - Venezuelan students are marching barefoot, building crucifixes and planning to burn effigies of President Nicolas Maduro to try and breathe new life into their protest movement over Easter.

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Disapproval of Brazil's president grows ahead of election

2:01am BST

BRASILIA - Disapproval of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff is steadily mounting less than six months away from an election in which she is still favoured to win a second term, according to a poll published Thursday.

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Exclusive - GM says recalled cars safe, but has not tested for knee-bump danger

17 Apr 2014

WASHINGTON - General Motors says that cars being recalled because of faulty ignition switches can be driven safely before repairs, based on more than 80 tests, but the automaker has not addressed a problem long known to potentially shut off the engine: a simple bump from a driver's knee.

Edward Hadas

Don’t bother with share-based pay

Coca-Cola’s controversial share award scheme takes a bad idea to a foolish extreme. Paying workers in their employer’s paper makes no sense. The share price has too little to do with corporate performance, and the work of any single employee has little effect on the share price.  Commentary 

Dominic Elliott

Credit Suisse still firing on one cylinder

Credit Suisse's private banking arm is pulling in more money. But an 11 percent year-on-year dip in quarterly investment banking revenue suggests the Swiss bank's other main engine isn’t motoring. Paring back further in fixed income would be one way to get things moving.  Commentary 

Hugo Dixon

How Greece can turn vice to virtue

The vicious cycle of two years ago is turning virtuous – see Athens' return to the bond market last week. More can be done to maintain momentum, especially rooting out vested interests. As ever, the weak spot is politics.  Commentary 

Nicholas Wapshott

The EU-U.S. love-hate relationship

While the Americans were funding and fixing the world economy, the Europeans decided to belatedly address their under-regulated banking and financial sectors and reform their overly generous labour laws and welfare arrangements funded by high public borrowing they wrongly blamed for the Great Recession.  Commentary 

Julian Hunt and Amy Stidworthy

How cities can help protect citizens from air pollution

When the Saharan dust hit London earlier this month, just as with the smog of the 1950s and of Dickens’s day, the cloud of dust particles was dense enough that less sunlight made it through to ground level. While forecasts and public warnings for such events exist, the experience demonstrated that they need to be related more precisely to health impacts.  Commentary 

Anatole Kaletsky

Behind Wall Street's anxiety

Stock market gains in the next few years are likely to be driven by very different companies than the leaders of the past five years. The bad news for investors is that these leadership rotations generally coincide with temporary market setbacks, since the old leaders tend to retreat faster than the laggards advance.   Commentary