Chile: Google Earth moves a village to Argentina

SANTIAGO Sat Apr 28, 2007 9:44pm BST

Larry Page, co-founder of Google, walks by a map of the world during keynote speech at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada January 6, 2006. The Chilean government wants Google <GOOG.O> to fix its Earth geographical search program that places a village named after Chilean independence hero Bernardo O'Higgins in Argentina. REUTERS/Steve Marcus

Larry Page, co-founder of Google, walks by a map of the world during keynote speech at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada January 6, 2006. The Chilean government wants Google <GOOG.O> to fix its Earth geographical search program that places a village named after Chilean independence hero Bernardo O'Higgins in Argentina.

Credit: Reuters/Steve Marcus

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SANTIAGO (Reuters) - The Chilean government wants Google to fix its Earth geographical search program that places a village named after Chilean independence hero Bernardo O'Higgins in Argentina.

The satellite image shows Villa O'Higgins, a tiny hamlet 1,000 miles (1,600 km) south of the Chilean capital, Santiago, on the Argentine side of the border.

"Chile has asked for this to be rectified, and it can only be hoped they do it soon," a Foreign Ministry spokesman in Santiago told Reuters on Saturday. He declined to say when the complaint was filed.

Chile and Argentina share the southern cone of South America, where the border between the two nations runs through a complex landscape of islands, fjords and mountains.

The two countries nearly went to war in the late 1970s over ownership of remote islands in the south. The dispute was resolved with the intervention of the Pope.

"We have received the request and are working with our partners to get more precise data for the region," said Google spokeswoman Megan Quinn.

"We're constantly working to improve the quality and accuracy of our maps. This is an ongoing process as we receive new information from third party data providers and as names and borders around the world continue to evolve," Quinn said.

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