Bra ads banned ahead of political party meet

BEIJING Fri Sep 28, 2007 10:06am BST

A shopkeeper reads newspapers at a textile market selling bras in Shanghai, September 5, 2005. Days after banning ''sexually provocative sounds'' on television, China has now stopped networks showing ''saucy'' adverts for push-up bras and figure-hugging underwear ahead of a major Communist Party meeting next month. REUTERS/Aly Song

A shopkeeper reads newspapers at a textile market selling bras in Shanghai, September 5, 2005. Days after banning ''sexually provocative sounds'' on television, China has now stopped networks showing ''saucy'' adverts for push-up bras and figure-hugging underwear ahead of a major Communist Party meeting next month.

Credit: Reuters/Aly Song

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BEIJING (Reuters) - Days after banning "sexually provocative sounds" on television, China has now stopped networks showing "saucy" adverts for push-up bras and figure-hugging underwear ahead of a major Communist Party meeting next month.

Other targets of the crackdown are "low-brow and base" commercials for sex toys and those featuring famous people or experts attesting to the efficacy of medicines, the State Administration of Radio, Film and Television said on its Web site (www.sarft.gov.cn) on Friday.

"Every television advertisement management bureau and television station must strengthen their political consciousness and responsibility towards society," Tian Jin, deputy head of the regulator, was quoted as saying.

The order is the latest in a raft of measures which have included axing reality shows featuring sex changes and plastic surgery and banning talent contests during prime-time.

The media watchdog's edicts have reached fever pitch in recent weeks, ahead of a meeting of the 17th Party congress, a sensitive five-yearly meeting at which key national leaders are appointed and policy set for the next few years.

It earlier urged the country's increasingly freewheeling broadcasters to forgo vulgarity and bad taste in the pursuit of ratings in favour of providing "inspiring" content for the masses imbued with "socialist" values.

"Create a positive atmosphere for public opinion," the regulator cited state television head Zhao Huayong as telling his staff in preparation for the congress.

"Strictly adhere to propaganda requirements; do not rush to report, do not report impulsively, and make sure there are no mistakes from reports on any large events," Zhao added.

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