Rice bra supports Japan's farming fad

TOKYO Thu May 13, 2010 6:39am BST

A model wears Triumph International's ''Grow-Your-Own-Rice bra'' in Tokyo May 12, 2010. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao

A model wears Triumph International's ''Grow-Your-Own-Rice bra'' in Tokyo May 12, 2010.

Credit: Reuters/Yuriko Nakao

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TOKYO (Reuters Life!) - Female urban farmers keen to keep their agricultural hobby close to their heart can now grow their own rice in a special bra designed by Japanese lingerie maker Triumph.

Trimuph, makers of other eccentric, gimmick bras that include one with a sushi set and another that comes with solar panels, said it came up with the "rice bra" because of the growing popularity of farming among city dwellers in Japan.

Growing concerns over food safety and the environment, and the ideal of a laid-back rural lifestyle, are attracting more urbanites to agriculture, once the mainstay of Japan's economy. Rice is also the nation's staple food.

"Over the last year, young Japanese women have taken a tremendous interest in agriculture. We wanted other women to experience farming as well," Triumph spokeswoman Yoshiko Masuda told Reuters at a Wednesday event.

"Home kits that allow people to grow their own rice are very popular online. We thought that it would be fun if a bra could give people the same experience," said Masuda.

The bra, made of recyclable plastic, can be tied together to create pots that also double as the cups.

These are then filled with soil, and rice seedlings, that are watered through a hose that also doubles as a belt that goes around the wearer's waist.

The bra also comes with gardening gloves.

"The bra fits much better than it looks. Wearing it puts me in such a fun mood," said model Reiko Aoyama in the lingerie.

Like other Triumph concept bras, the rice bra will not go on sale, with the company saying it was another way to generate interest in its brand.

(Reporting by Akiko Fujita, editing by Miral Fahmy)

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