Nikkei seen rising, markets await U.S. election result

Tue Nov 6, 2012 11:19pm GMT

TOKYO, Nov 7 (Reuters) - Japan's Nikkei share average is
expected to rise on Wednesday in line with gains in U.S. stocks,
but is seen holding a tight band as markets await the result of
the U.S. presidential election.
    Market players said a weaker yen would support Japanese
exporters, with the dollar holding above 80 yen.
    "All eyes are on the outcome of the election, so once the
market rises in early trade, it will probably stay in a narrow
range," said Kenichi Hirano, a strategist at Tachibana
Securities.
    Analysts said the Nikkei was likely to trade between 8,950
to 9,100 on Wednesday. Nikkei futures in Chicago closed
at 9,045, up from the close in Osaka of 8,980.
    U.S. stocks climbed on Tuesday, the last day of trading
before the U.S. election results came to a close, as investors
looked forward to a resolution to the drawn-out race for the
White House. 
    On Wednesday, the Nikkei slipped 0.4 percent to 8,975.15,
dropping below its 5-day moving average of 8,981.79. The broader
Topix was also 0.4 percent lower at 744.88.
    The benchmark Nikkei is up 6.1 percent this year, trailing a
13.6 percent rise in the U.S. S&P 500 and a 12.4 percent
gain in the pan-European STOXX Europe 600 index. 
    
> Wall St jumps as election waiting nears the end 
> Dollar eyes U.S. presidential race, AUD shines 
> Bonds fall as auction lackluster; vote eyed 
> Gold jumps 2 pct on Obama bets, technical bounce 
> Oil up with Wall Street as U.S. goes to the polls 
    STOCKS TO WATCH
   --NISSAN MOTOR CORP 
    Nissan cut its full-year net profit forecast by 20 percent
to 320 billion yen ($3.99 billion), joining rival Honda Motor
, after car sales tumbled in China, the world's biggest
autos market, amid anti-Japanese protests over a territorial
dispute. 
   --MARUBENI CORP 
    Marubeni which in May sealed a $5.6 billion deal to buy U.S.
grain merchant Gavilon, said on Tuesday it is still waiting for
Chinese regulators to approve the deal, but denied tensions
between Tokyo and Beijing are causing the holdup.