China, Taiwan extend olive branches after Xi's promotion

BEIJING Thu Nov 15, 2012 11:22am GMT

BEIJING (Reuters) - The leaders of China and long-time rival Taiwan had rare direct political contact on Thursday after Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou sent congratulatory messages to China's new and outgoing Communist Party leaders, Xi Jinping and Hu Jintao.

China and Taiwan have been ruled separately since defeated Nationalist forces fled to the island at the end of a civil war in 1949. China has never ruled out the use of force to bring Taiwan under its control.

While relations have improved dramatically since Ma's election in 2008, with a series of trade and tourism deals signed, there has been no progress towards political reconciliation or a lessening of military distrust.

"Looking towards the future, the great cause of rejuvenating the Chinese nation is in the ascendant, the two sides of the Strait expect a strengthening of mutual trust and sincere cooperation, which will benefit the people on the two sides," China's Xinhua news agency quoted Ma as saying in a message.

The message was sent after the new line-up of top Chinese Communist leaders was made public in the wake of the 18th Party Congress, at which Xi was appointed party chief. He will take over from Hu as president in March.

As governor of the frontline southeastern province of Fujian in the 1990s, Xi helped attract Taiwan investment to the region which lies directly across the narrow strait.

In response to Ma's message, Xi wrote back to say he hoped the Communist Party and Ma's Nationalist Party - once blood enemies - would seize a historic opportunity to improve ties.

Hu, who oversaw the improvement of relations with Taiwan, also wrote back expressing hope that the two sides could strengthen their cooperation.

(Reporting by John Ruwitch; Editing by Ben Blanchard)

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Comments (4)
Kailim wrote:
It is the best news for Chinese all over the world. The pre-requisite for rejuvenating the Chinese nation is reconciliation and eventual unification of both sides of the Strait. I hope I will be able to live to see it.

Nov 15, 2012 1:54pm GMT  --  Report as abuse
DeanMJackson wrote:
The article reads, ‘”Looking towards the future, the great cause of rejuvenating the Chinese nation is in the ascendant, the two sides of the Strait expect a strengthening of mutual trust and sincere cooperation, which will benefit the people on the two sides,” China’s Xinhua news agency quoted Ma as saying in a message.”‘

For those of you not familiar with the “Long-Range Policy” (LRP), it is the “new” strategy China and all other Communist nations signed onto in 1960 as the only feasible means in defeating the West, considering the weakness of Chinese Communist Party membership in any particular Communist nation (only 4.99% in China).

The last major disinformation operation within the LRP was the fraudulent “collapse” of the USSR in 1991. The next major disinformation operation within the LRP will be the equally fraudulent “collapse” of the Chinese Communist government. When this occurs Taiwan will be politically stymied from not immediately joining the mainland.

For those of you who weren’t paying attention to the irregularities immediately following post “collapse” USSR, if the collapse of the USSR had been legitimate, the following obligatory actions would have taken place, as they always take place after political revolutions:

(1) Immediately after the “collapse” of the USSR high-ranking present and “former” Communist Party members within the various Federal government civilian/military/intelligence branches of the post Soviet republics were never arrested in the interests of national security:

Since there was no conquest that liberated the USSR, it would have been up to the people themselves to conduct the arrests to ensure the continuity of the freed state.

(2) Lower level Communist Party members within the 15 governments of the post USSR would have been immediately fired in the interests of national security:

The hated low-ranking CPSU members at all levels of government, who for 74 years persecuted the 90% of the population who were non-Communist, would have been fired from government positions, especially education. The freed Soviet public would then have requested assistance from the West to ensure critical services remained on-line until enough qualified freed Soviets could fill those positions.

(3) the Russian electorate these last 21 years have inexplicably only been electing for President and Prime Minister Soviet era Communist Party Quislings:

Presidents of Russia since 1991:

Boris Nikolayevich Yeltsin – July 10, 1991 – December 31, 1999 – Communist.

Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin – 31 December 1999 – 7 May 2000 (Acting) and May 7, 2000 – May 7, 2008 – Communist.

Dmitry Anatolyevich Medvedev – May 7, 2008 – May 7, 2012, during his studies at the University he joined the Communist Party.

Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin – May 7, 2012 – Present, Communist:

Yeltsin and Putin would have been arrested in the interests of national security, while Medvedev would have been shunned by the newly freed Russians.

(4) there was no de-Communization program initiated after the “collapse” of the USSR to ferret out Soviet era Communist agents still in power:

The fact that there were no Allies in the freed USSR to carry out a de-Communization program, meant the freed Soviets would not only have had to take up that program themselves but ensure, unlike the German de-Nazification example in post war Germany, its effectiveness since:

(a) there was no occupation force to ensure the Communists weren’t still in power or could mount a violent comeback; and

(b) ) unlike the Nazis that persecuted minorities in Germany, and were not generally hated by the dominant society, in the USSR Communists were the hated minority who persecuted the majority.

(5) not one “crime against humanity” indictment of the thousands of criminals still alive who committed crimes on Soviet territory:

Even post Nazi Germany (West and East) convicted and imprisoned Nazi war criminals.

(6) the refusal of the Russian Navy to remove the hated Communist Red Star from the bows of vessels, and the refusal of the Russian Air Force to remove the Communist Red Star from the wings of Russian military aircraft, not to mention placing the hated Communist Red Star on all new Naval vessels and military aircraft:

To the ordinary Russian, the Communist Red Star was the symbol for the hated Communist regime that for 74 years persecuted the 90% of the nation who were non-Communist; and

(7) Lenin’s tomb still exists in Red Square:

Just as the people of Germany tore apart the Berlin Wall in 1989, so too the Russian people would have destroyed Lenin’s tomb on December 25, 1991. The 74-year persecution of the 90% non-Communist Russian population would have seen Lenin’s tomb destroyed.

Nov 15, 2012 2:44pm GMT  --  Report as abuse
SpockV wrote:
Hope Chinese people can learn from the Germans.

Nov 15, 2012 2:57pm GMT  --  Report as abuse
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