Cameron urges Google, Yahoo to act on child pornography

LONDON Sun Jul 21, 2013 7:50pm BST

1 of 2. Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron speaks with BBC journalist Andrew Marr during a televised interview in the garden of 10 Downing Street in London on July 19, 2013 in this handout photo released by the BBC on July 21, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Jeff Overs/BBC/handout via Reuters

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LONDON (Reuters) - British Prime Minister David Cameron challenged the Internet search engine providers Google, Yahoo and Bing on Sunday to block images of child abuse, calling for more action against online pornography.

In a television interview, Cameron said search engines must block results for searches using blacklisted keywords to stop Internet users accessing illegal images.

Evidence in two recent high-profile child murders in Britain has shown that the killers accessed online child pornography. Although search companies have pledged to help remove images from the Internet, Cameron says he wants them to go further.

"I have a very clear message for Google, Bing, Yahoo and the rest. You have a duty to act on this - and it is a moral duty," Cameron was due to say in a speech on Monday, according to an advance text, demanding that the companies report back to him in October on their progress.

Cameron also said the government was ready to introduce new laws if search engine providers did not offer enough cooperation.

Last week, U.S. authorities said they had arrested 255 people suspected of sexually exploiting children online in a cross-border operation involving eight other countries.

In June, Google donated around 3 million pounds to combat the problem, including 1 million pounds to the Internet Watch Foundation, a group committed to ridding the Internet of child pornography.

"We have a zero tolerance attitude to child sexual abuse imagery. Whenever we discover it, we respond quickly to remove and report it," a Google spokesperson said.

Bing, owned by Microsoft Corp, said it would support education and deterrence campaigns and that it was working with the British government to determine the best industry-wide approach to tackle illegal content.

Yahoo was not immediately available for comment.

(Reporting by William James; Editing by Kevin Liffey)

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Comments (4)
Raymond.Vermont wrote:
How will the P.M (and other law abiding persons) really know that child pornography on the internet, has been tackled?

Its an offence to search for it,(from what I understand) so presumably journalists and politicians are going to have to take the word of ‘professionals’, that it is all being blocked, and that positive action has been taken by the search providers against it?

Jul 21, 2013 11:36pm BST  --  Report as abuse
meolive wrote:
This has nothing to do with child protection, if it did the ConDems would not have cut funding to the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP) who are the experts in catching those involved. It won’t have any effect on paedophiles as details from police operations show this is not how they operate. Note that there was apparently no police consultation about this, and the priorities CEOP identified were totally different.

It is however a way to force search providers to adhere to a government-specified blacklist of undesirable terms, exactly as the Chinese government does to control information available to the public and the media. When governments want to control the information you consume it is a very dangerous, very slippery slope.

Jul 21, 2013 3:10am BST  --  Report as abuse
mgb500 wrote:
and how long before topics such as ‘government coverup’ are deemed undesirable……we’ll soon have our own Tienanmen Square list issued by the ‘government’….the Stasi would love Camoron.

Do your research now……while you still can…damn….The Thought Police are kicking the door in ….

Jul 21, 2013 5:36am BST  --  Report as abuse
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