Cameron: Syria will use chemical weapons again without U.S. strike

LONDON Thu Sep 5, 2013 4:38pm BST

1 of 2. Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron attends the first working session of the G20 Summit in Constantine Palace in Strelna near St. Petersburg, September 5, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Sergei Karpukhin

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LONDON (Reuters) - Prime Minister David Cameron said on Wednesday he believed the Syrian government would use chemical weapons against its own people again if the United States stepped back from taking military action against it.

When asked by an opposition Labour party lawmaker whether he would push for a ceasefire in Syria rather than a "bombing raid", Cameron told parliament that U.S. President Barack Obama had issued a clear warning to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad on chemical weapons and was right to stick to it.

"I would just ask her to put herself for a moment in the shoes of the president of the United States," Cameron told the lawmaker during his weekly question and answer session in parliament.

"He set a very clear red line, that if there was large-scale chemical weapons use something had to happen. To ask the president of the United States, having set that red line, having made that warning, to step away from it I think that would be a very perilous suggestion to make because in response I think you would see more chemical weapons attacks from the regime."

Cameron repeated that Britain would take no part in any military action against Syria after he lost what turned out to be a vital parliamentary vote on the issue last week, but said the world still needed to take a tough line on Assad's "revolting" use of chemical weapons.

(Reporting By Andrew Osborn; Editing by Stephen Addison)

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Comments (3)
Raymond.Vermont wrote:
Cameron: Syria will use chemical weapons again without U.S. strike

No credible evidence of it first time around.

Not even one UN authorised post mortem of a victim’s body, not any accurate and independently verified figure for the deaths,(other than thumb in the air and pluck a number from it) and no indication of any mass panic within the Damascus city populous region, post the alleged attack.(as one would expect through word of mouth) Further no mass collapse in support for the Syrian govt from its people.

What we do know, is, if you repeat a lie often enough, some shalt believe that lies… Even from the political and media establishments elite.

All-in-all, an attempted regime change too far!

Sep 06, 2013 9:04pm BST  --  Report as abuse
Raymond.Vermont wrote:
And when you have the ‘rebels’ (i.e Syrian govt opposition) themselves claiming full accidental responsibility… What more does one need?

“Rebels and local residents in Ghouta accuse Saudi Prince Bandar bin Sultan of providing chemical weapons to an al-Qaida linked rebel group.”

By Dale Gavlak and Yahya Ababneh | August 29, 2013

http://www.mintpressnews.com/witnesses-of-gas-attack-say-saudis-supplied-rebels-with-chemical-weapons/168135/

Sep 06, 2013 9:39pm BST  --  Report as abuse
Raymond.Vermont wrote:
And when you have the ‘rebels’ (i.e Syrian govt opposition) themselves claiming full accidental responsibility… What more does one need?

“Rebels and local residents in Ghouta accuse Saudi Prince Bandar bin Sultan of providing chemical weapons to an al-Qaida linked rebel group.”

By Dale Gavlak and Yahya Ababneh | August 29, 2013

http://www.mintpressnews.com/witnesses-of-gas-attack-say-saudis-supplied-rebels-with-chemical-weapons/168135/

Sep 06, 2013 9:39pm BST  --  Report as abuse
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