Russia summons German ambassador over Crimea Nazi comparison

MOSCOW Thu Apr 3, 2014 2:30pm BST

Germany's Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble waits for a family photo during a European Union Finance Ministers informal meeting in Athens April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis

Germany's Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble waits for a family photo during a European Union Finance Ministers informal meeting in Athens April 1, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Alkis Konstantinidis

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MOSCOW (Reuters) - Germany's ambassador to Russia has been summoned by the Russian Foreign Ministry over remarks by Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble likening Russian moves in Crimea to Nazi Germany, the ministry said on Thursday.

"We consider such pseudo-historical references by the German minister provocative," it said in a statement. "The comparisons by him are a gross manipulation of historic facts."

Schaeuble said Russia's annexation of Ukraine's Crimea region were reminiscent of Adolf Hitler's aggression in 1938 that led to the annexation of German-speaking regions of Czechoslovakia.

(Reporting By Alexei Anishchuk, editing by Elizabeth Piper)

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Comments (1)
Bilboburgler wrote:
The analogy with invasions of the Gdansk corridor, Czech and Austria are hauntingly similar. That someone mentions it is hardly surprising. That the Russians don’t like it is obvious and probably was in the game book when they planned all this.

Don’t let any Russians move in next door or you could be invaded. Take care in Florida.

Apr 04, 2014 7:59am BST  --  Report as abuse
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