UKIP's Farage sets sights on 2015 national election after vote gains

SOUTHAMPTON England Mon May 26, 2014 1:29am BST

UK Independence Party (UKIP) leader Nigel Farage and UKIP candidates Janice Atkinson (L) and Diane Jones (R) react to the results of the European Parliament election for the south east region, in Southampton, southern England May 25, 2014.  REUTERS/Luke MacGregor

UK Independence Party (UKIP) leader Nigel Farage and UKIP candidates Janice Atkinson (L) and Diane Jones (R) react to the results of the European Parliament election for the south east region, in Southampton, southern England May 25, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Luke MacGregor

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SOUTHAMPTON England (Reuters) - The leader of UKIP, Nigel Farage, said on Monday that the gains made by his anti-European Union party in a European election would usher in a new era in British politics and that he would target marginal constituencies in next year's national election.

"The people's army of UKIP have spoken tonight and delivered just about the most extraordinary result that has been seen in British politics for 100 years," Farage said after being re-elected as a member of the European Parliament.

Farage was speaking as partial results showed UKIP was on course to win elections to the European Parliament, riding a tide of Euroscepticism and discontent about immigration to beat Prime Minister David Cameron's Conservative party and the opposition Labour party.

Speaking in the English port city of Southampton, Farage said: "The penny has really dropped that as members of this (European) Union we can't run our own country and crucially we can't control our own borders.

"We will go from here, our people's army will go from here, to Newark and we will go on next year to the general election with a targeting strategy," he added, referring to an upcoming one-off vote for a single parliamentary seat and a national election next year.

"And I promise you this - you haven't heard the last of us," he said.

"We could make up the balance of power with fewer seats than the LibDems got last time," he told reporters, referring to the Liberal Democrat party, the junior party in the governing coalition.

(Reporting by Guy Faulconbridge; Editing by Andrew Osborn)

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