Reuters logo
COLUMN-Avoid career burnout by learning to love your job again
March 12, 2015 / 12:03 PM / 3 years ago

COLUMN-Avoid career burnout by learning to love your job again

(The opinions expressed here are those of the author, a columnist for Reuters.)

By Mark Miller

CHICAGO, March 12 (Reuters) - If you are counting the days to retirement because you hate your job, career expert Kerry Hannon has a message for you: “Stick with it.”

Burnout is one of the biggest problems in the workplace, especially for older workers. An annual survey on retirement by the Employee Benefit Research Institute consistently finds that about half of workers retire earlier than they expected - and that job burnout is a key factor.

But sticking it out is important to retirement security, Hannon says in her new book “Love Your Job: The New Rules for Career Happiness” (Wiley, 2015). These are usually the highest-earning years of your career, she argues. And staying employed helps with everything from retirement account contributions to enabling a delayed filing for Social Security benefits.

Reuters asked Hannon for her tips on how older workers can stay engaged and on the job:

Q: Why is the idea of “falling in love with your job” important for older workers nearing retirement?

A: The people I interview have this palpable fear about outliving their money. They want to find work - full- or part-time. But even with the improved economy, if you’re over 50 and looking for work, it’s still hard - it takes almost 30 months longer to find a job than it does for younger people - ageism is still rampant. So, if you have a job, for gosh sakes, you should hang on to it.

Q: But what if your job is really awful?

A: There still are things you can do to find some joy around the edges - to make the job come alive for you. But it might not be specific to the job. Then, if you really need to make a change, by all means do so, but don’t leave your current job until you have a new one.

Q: What are some examples of finding “joy around the edges?”

A: Perhaps you don’t love what you do, but you do really like your co-workers or the mission of the organization. It might be the challenge of learning something new, or working from home - the things that circle around the job itself.

Extracurriculars tied to the job are one good way to get re-engaged. Many companies offer the opportunity to do volunteer work right within the organization. If you can find a volunteer gig through your employer, that can help build relationships with co-workers and bonds across departments that you might never have had otherwise. And it gets you out of your own head and gives you perspective on the needs of others.

A couple examples that I mention in the book: The National Institutes of Health has its own orchestra that plays gigs at assisted living centers and hospices. Marsh & McLennan Companies Inc has an employee choir.

You might find it by telecommuting. Research shows that telecommuting employees are happier, more loyal and have fewer absences. If you don’t have a boss hovering over you, that can give you a sense of flexibility about getting your work done.

Q: How about learning to love the job itself?

A: Learning a new work-related skill can be key. When you learn something new, your brain shifts. If your employer sponsors workshops or skill-based learning, they may not think of offering it to you if you’re older than 50 - but you can raise your hand and ask for it.

Q: How do life values change as we get older, and how does that affect the way we relate to our jobs?

A: When we are younger, our work is our life on so many levels. In your twenties and thirties, your social friends usually are your work friends. Your identity is tied up in who you are and your job. And, we are establishing ourselves in our fields.

But as we age we have families and more outside interests. In your fifties, you probably aren’t pushing your way up the ladder, perhaps even doing something that wasn’t your primary career. So, work loses its emphasis, but you want those hours to be fulfilling. (Editing by Beth Pinsker and Paul Simao)

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
0 : 0
  • narrow-browser-and-phone
  • medium-browser-and-portrait-tablet
  • landscape-tablet
  • medium-wide-browser
  • wide-browser-and-larger
  • medium-browser-and-landscape-tablet
  • medium-wide-browser-and-larger
  • above-phone
  • portrait-tablet-and-above
  • above-portrait-tablet
  • landscape-tablet-and-above
  • landscape-tablet-and-medium-wide-browser
  • portrait-tablet-and-below
  • landscape-tablet-and-below