March 5, 2009 / 11:44 AM / 8 years ago

Archaeologists find statues of ancient Egypt king

1 Min Read

<p>One of two statues discovered by a team of Egyptian and European archaeologists on the west bank of the Nile in Luxor, 600 km (373 miles) south of Cairo, is seen in this undated handout. The team discovered the statues of King Amenhotep III, who ruled Egypt roughly 3,400 years ago, the Supreme Council for Antiquities said on March 5, 2009.Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities/Handout</p>

CAIRO (Reuters) - A team of Egyptian and European archaeologists have discovered two statues of King Amenhotep III, who ruled Egypt roughly 3,400 years ago, the Supreme Council for Antiquities said Thursday.

Slideshow (2 Images)

Chief Egyptian archaeologist Zahi Hawaas said in a statement the first statute was made of black granite, while the second depicts the king in the shape of a Sphinx, a figure with the head of a man and the body of a lion.

Amenhotep III presided over an era which saw a renaissance in Egyptian art. He was succeeded by his son Akhenaten, the sun-worshipping pharaoh credited by some for starting the world's first known monotheistic religion.

Writing by Alaa Shahine; Editing by Phakamisa Ndzamela

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