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Global Investment Outlook 2016 Headlines

Highlights Day 5: U.S. equities to gain, Japan a top pick

Erin Browne, portfolio manager at Point72 Asset Management, said U.S. equities could deliver high single-digit returns next year, while Mark Burgess of Columbia Threadneedle Investments EMEA said Japanese stocks were his top pick.

Highlights Day 4: Benefits of mergers, art market 'frothy'

Ed Yardeni of Yardeni Research said on Thursday he was bullish on U.S. shares given the prevalence of merger activity and share buybacks, while Margaret Patel of Wells Capital Management said real estate looked fully-priced and art looked "frothy."

Big investors see technology easing inflation pressures

New technologies have tempered some inflationary pressures, which could give the U.S. Federal Reserve some breathing room on the pace of interest rate hikes in the new year, according to a number of big investors at the Reuters Global Investment Outlook Summit.

Cohen's Point72 eyes faster rate hikes, strong dollar

U.S. central bankers may have to speed up the pace of their expected interest rate hikes late next year to prevent prices from rising too quickly, an economist at billionaire Steven A. Cohen's family office said on Friday.

Risk of market jolt on Brexit could complicate BoE decision

UK markets have not even begun to discount the chance that Britain could vote to leave the European Union next year, raising the risk of a blowup closer to the vote and complicating the timing of any Bank of England interest rate rise, top investors say.

CIFC’s Wriedt: CLOs must be retention compliant

Funds that purchase leveraged loans will need to start complying with regulations requiring managers to hold onto a portion of the risk even though the rules do not take effect for another year, according to Oliver Wriedt, co-president at New York-based CIFC Corp.

QE-fueled share buybacks may lose luster

Ramped-up monetary stimulus from the European Central Bank is likely to fuel investor unease over companies funneling cash into share buybacks - which have hit a four-year high - rather than investment, asset managers warned.