Reuters

Rise of Russia's far-right

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Russian nationalists shout as they attend a "Russian March" demonstration on National Unity Day in Moscow November 4, 2012. REUTERS/Mikhail Voskresenskiy

Russian nationalists shout as they attend a "Russian March" demonstration on National Unity Day in Moscow November 4, 2012. REUTERS/Mikhail Voskresenskiy

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Russian nationalists cover their faces as they walk in a smog during a "Russian March" demonstration on National Unity Day in Moscow November 4, 2012. REUTERS/Mikhail Voskresenskiy

Russian nationalists cover their faces as they walk in a smog during a "Russian March" demonstration on National Unity Day in Moscow November 4, 2012. REUTERS/Mikhail Voskresenskiy

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Russian nationalists shout as they attend a "Russian March" demonstration on National Unity Day in Moscow November 4, 2012. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov

Russian nationalists shout as they attend a "Russian March" demonstration on National Unity Day in Moscow November 4, 2012. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov

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People hold portraits of people, Russian citizens killed by representatives of other nationalities and ethnic groups according to participants, during a rally in St. Petersburg September 30, 2012. The banner reads "We demand the visa regime for the countries of Central Asia and Transcaucasus". REUTERS/Alexander Demianchuk

People hold portraits of people, Russian citizens killed by representatives of other nationalities and ethnic groups according to participants, during a rally in St. Petersburg September 30, 2012. The banner reads "We demand the visa regime for the countries of Central Asia and Transcaucasus". REUTERS/Alexander Demianchuk

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Activists from left wing political and nationalist parties march during a protest against capitalism in Moscow September 9, 2012. Image rotated 180 degrees. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov

Activists from left wing political and nationalist parties march during a protest against capitalism in Moscow September 9, 2012. Image rotated 180 degrees. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov

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Ultra-nationalist demonstrators chant slogans as they march on International Workers' Day, or Labour Day, during a rally in Moscow, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Tatyana Makeyeva

Ultra-nationalist demonstrators chant slogans as they march on International Workers' Day, or Labour Day, during a rally in Moscow, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Tatyana Makeyeva

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Russian ultra-nationalists take part in the so-called "Russian March" demonstration on the National Unity Day in the capital Moscow, November 4, 2011. REUTERS/Denis Sinyakov

Russian ultra-nationalists take part in the so-called "Russian March" demonstration on the National Unity Day in the capital Moscow, November 4, 2011. REUTERS/Denis Sinyakov

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A man attacks a gay rights activist during a gay pride parade, which was unsanctioned by the city authorities, in St. Petersburg June 25, 2011. REUTERS/Stringer

A man attacks a gay rights activist during a gay pride parade, which was unsanctioned by the city authorities, in St. Petersburg June 25, 2011. REUTERS/Stringer

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Right-wing protesters beat a passer-by of a non-Slavic appearance in central Moscow December 11, 2010. Several football fans were injured in central Moscow in clashes with Interior Ministry troops that broke out during a thousands-strong rally in memory of a Spartak Moscow supporter killed earlier. A number of passers-by, who were of a non-Slavic appearance, were attacked by the fans, according to a Reuters witness. REUTERS/Maria...more

Right-wing protesters beat a passer-by of a non-Slavic appearance in central Moscow December 11, 2010. Several football fans were injured in central Moscow in clashes with Interior Ministry troops that broke out during a thousands-strong rally in memory of a Spartak Moscow supporter killed earlier. A number of passers-by, who were of a non-Slavic appearance, were attacked by the fans, according to a Reuters witness. REUTERS/Maria Turchenkova

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Youths from Russia's north Caucasus region bleed after being attacked by football fans and right wing protesters during a rally in central Moscow December 11, 2010. REUTERS/Denis Sinyakov

Youths from Russia's north Caucasus region bleed after being attacked by football fans and right wing protesters during a rally in central Moscow December 11, 2010. REUTERS/Denis Sinyakov

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A group of right-wing protesters beats up a passer-by they consider to be from Russia's North Caucasus region during a rally in central Moscow December 11, 2010. REUTERS/Nikolai Korchekov

A group of right-wing protesters beats up a passer-by they consider to be from Russia's North Caucasus region during a rally in central Moscow December 11, 2010. REUTERS/Nikolai Korchekov

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A police officer (L) pulls a man from Russia's North Caucasus region from right-wing protesters during a rally in central Moscow December 11, 2010. REUTERS/Mikhail Voskresensky

A police officer (L) pulls a man from Russia's North Caucasus region from right-wing protesters during a rally in central Moscow December 11, 2010. REUTERS/Mikhail Voskresensky

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Russian ultra-nationalists light flares during a demonstration on the outskirts of Moscow, November 4, 2010. The banner reads: "The will of blood - is the call for action." REUTERS/Mikhail Voskresensky

Russian ultra-nationalists light flares during a demonstration on the outskirts of Moscow, November 4, 2010. The banner reads: "The will of blood - is the call for action." REUTERS/Mikhail Voskresensky

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Russian ultra nationalists carry the historic flag of the Russian empire during a demonstration on the outskirts of Moscow November 4, 2009. REUTERS/Denis Sinyakov

Russian ultra nationalists carry the historic flag of the Russian empire during a demonstration on the outskirts of Moscow November 4, 2009. REUTERS/Denis Sinyakov

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Right-wing protesters attend a rally opposing a planned Gay Pride parade in Moscow May 26, 2007. The writing on the T-Shirt reads "Russian National Unity." The tattoo on the man's stomach reads "Slav." REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin

Right-wing protesters attend a rally opposing a planned Gay Pride parade in Moscow May 26, 2007. The writing on the T-Shirt reads "Russian National Unity." The tattoo on the man's stomach reads "Slav." REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin

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Young Russian nationalists shout slogans as they take part in a May Day demonstration in central Moscow May 1, 2006. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin

Young Russian nationalists shout slogans as they take part in a May Day demonstration in central Moscow May 1, 2006. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin

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