Thomson Reuters

Dozens held after Islamists attack Algerian gas field

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An undated general view of the In Amenas gas facility about 100 km (60 miles) from the Algerian and Libyan border, is seen in this picture provided by Norwegian oil company Statoil January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kjetil Alsvik / Statoil/Handout

An undated general view of the In Amenas gas facility about 100 km (60 miles) from the Algerian and Libyan border, is seen in this picture provided by Norwegian oil company Statoil January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kjetil Alsvik / Statoil/Handout
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A general view of Norwegian oik firm Statoil headquarters in Stavanger, Norway in this picture provided by Scanpix January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kent Skibstad/Scanpix

A general view of Norwegian oik firm Statoil headquarters in Stavanger, Norway in this picture provided by Scanpix January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kent Skibstad/Scanpix
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Lars Christian Bacher, director for international affairs at Norwegian oil firm Statoil, gives a news conference in regards to the attack at gas field in Algeria, at Stavanger, Norway in this picture provided by Scanpix January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kent Skibstad/Scanpix

Lars Christian Bacher, director for international affairs at Norwegian oil firm Statoil, gives a news conference in regards to the attack at gas field in Algeria, at Stavanger, Norway in this picture provided by Scanpix January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kent Skibstad/Scanpix
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SCANPIX

Lars Christian Bacher, director for international affairs at Norwegian oil firm Statoil, gives a news conference in regards to the attack at gas field in Algeria, at Stavanger, Norway in this picture provided by Scanpix January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kent Skibstad/Scanpix

Lars Christian Bacher, director for international affairs at Norwegian oil firm Statoil, gives a news conference in regards to the attack at gas field in Algeria, at Stavanger, Norway in this picture provided by Scanpix January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kent Skibstad/Scanpix
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A road sign indicating In Amenas, about 100 km (60 miles) from the Algerian and Libyan border, is seen in this undated picture provided by Norwegian oil company Statoil January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kjetil Alsvik / Statoil/Handout

A road sign indicating In Amenas, about 100 km (60 miles) from the Algerian and Libyan border, is seen in this undated picture provided by Norwegian oil company Statoil January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kjetil Alsvik / Statoil/Handout
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HANDOUT

An undated general view of the In Amenas gas facility about 100 km (60 miles) from the Algerian and Libyan border, is seen in this picture provided by Norwegian oil company Statoil January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kjetil Alsvik / Statoil/Handout

An undated general view of the In Amenas gas facility about 100 km (60 miles) from the Algerian and Libyan border, is seen in this picture provided by Norwegian oil company Statoil January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kjetil Alsvik / Statoil/Handout
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HANDOUT

An undated general view of the In Amenas gas facility about 100 km (60 miles) from the Algerian and Libyan border, is seen in this picture provided by Norwegian oil company Statoil January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kjetil Alsvik / Statoil/Handout

An undated general view of the In Amenas gas facility about 100 km (60 miles) from the Algerian and Libyan border, is seen in this picture provided by Norwegian oil company Statoil January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kjetil Alsvik / Statoil/Handout
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KYODO

The Public Relations manager of JGC Corp Takeshi Endo answers reporters' questions regarding Japanese nationals who were kidnapped in Algeria, at its headquarters in Yokohama, south of Tokyo in this photo taken by Kyodo January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kyodo

The Public Relations manager of JGC Corp Takeshi Endo answers reporters' questions regarding Japanese nationals who were kidnapped in Algeria, at its headquarters in Yokohama, south of Tokyo in this photo taken by Kyodo January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kyodo
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KYODO

A Public Relations staff of JGC Corp answers reporters' questions regarding Japanese nationals who were kidnapped in Algeria, at its headquarters in Yokohama, south of Tokyo in this photo taken by Kyodo January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kyodo

A Public Relations staff of JGC Corp answers reporters' questions regarding Japanese nationals who were kidnapped in Algeria, at its headquarters in Yokohama, south of Tokyo in this photo taken by Kyodo January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kyodo
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