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Pictures | Sat Feb 11, 2017 | 1:55am GMT

From Mosul to Michigan

Members of al-Qassab family, Iraqi Christian refugees from Mosul, prepare their luggage ahead of their travel to the United States at their temporary home in Beirut, Lebanon. The family flitted from one Iraqi city to another fleeing Islamic State, then waited three years in Beirut until they were cleared to move to the United States.

REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir

Members of al-Qassab family, Iraqi Christian refugees from Mosul, prepare their luggage ahead of their travel to the United States at their temporary home in Beirut, Lebanon. The family flitted from one Iraqi city to another fleeing Islamic State,...more

Members of al-Qassab family, Iraqi Christian refugees from Mosul, prepare their luggage ahead of their travel to the United States at their temporary home in Beirut, Lebanon. The family flitted from one Iraqi city to another fleeing Islamic State, then waited three years in Beirut until they were cleared to move to the United States. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir
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The al-Qassab family pose near their luggage at their temporary home in Beirut, Lebanon. Their plans to fly out last week were derailed after President Donald Trump froze refugee arrivals.

REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir

The al-Qassab family pose near their luggage at their temporary home in Beirut, Lebanon. Their plans to fly out last week were derailed after President Donald Trump froze refugee arrivals. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir

The al-Qassab family pose near their luggage at their temporary home in Beirut, Lebanon. Their plans to fly out last week were derailed after President Donald Trump froze refugee arrivals. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir
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Nizar al-Qassab carries his family's luggage ahead of their travel, in Lebanon. Amira had taken her two youngest children out of school, the others had quit their jobs, and their suitcases had remained packed for weeks before a U.S. judge temporarily suspended the travel ban.

REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir

Nizar al-Qassab carries his family's luggage ahead of their travel, in Lebanon. Amira had taken her two youngest children out of school, the others had quit their jobs, and their suitcases had remained packed for weeks before a U.S. judge temporarily...more

Nizar al-Qassab carries his family's luggage ahead of their travel, in Lebanon. Amira had taken her two youngest children out of school, the others had quit their jobs, and their suitcases had remained packed for weeks before a U.S. judge temporarily suspended the travel ban. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir
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Members of the Qassab family prepare their luggage in Beirut. As the family left for Michigan on Wednesday lugging 10 suitcases, they hoped to end a long road -- still fraught with fear -- to resettling as refugees in the United States.

 REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir

Members of the Qassab family prepare their luggage in Beirut. As the family left for Michigan on Wednesday lugging 10 suitcases, they hoped to end a long road -- still fraught with fear -- to resettling as refugees in the United States. ...more

Members of the Qassab family prepare their luggage in Beirut. As the family left for Michigan on Wednesday lugging 10 suitcases, they hoped to end a long road -- still fraught with fear -- to resettling as refugees in the United States. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir
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Nizar al-Qassab sees his children off at Beirut international airport. "We were really happy we would travel" but it was bittersweet, said Amira, whose husband Nizar was denied resettlement to the United States twice. This marked the first time they have been apart since they married nearly 30 years ago and they did not know when or where they would meet again. "I don't know what my fate will be," said Nizar, 52, whose two brothers resettled in Michigan about four years ago. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir

Nizar al-Qassab sees his children off at Beirut international airport. "We were really happy we would travel" but it was bittersweet, said Amira, whose husband Nizar was denied resettlement to the United States twice. This marked the first time they...more

Nizar al-Qassab sees his children off at Beirut international airport. "We were really happy we would travel" but it was bittersweet, said Amira, whose husband Nizar was denied resettlement to the United States twice. This marked the first time they have been apart since they married nearly 30 years ago and they did not know when or where they would meet again. "I don't know what my fate will be," said Nizar, 52, whose two brothers resettled in Michigan about four years ago. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir
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Nizar al-Qassab pushes his family's luggage at Beirut international airport. In Beirut, the family lived in a small, dingy apartment in a suburb. Nizar was not able to find a job, he said. Their son, 22, worked at a factory to make rent while their daughter, 18, worked to cover food and living expenses. "We had waited a long time, and our situation here is really bad," he said. "My children don't have a future here. So I was forced to let them go."

REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir

Nizar al-Qassab pushes his family's luggage at Beirut international airport. In Beirut, the family lived in a small, dingy apartment in a suburb. Nizar was not able to find a job, he said. Their son, 22, worked at a factory to make rent while their...more

Nizar al-Qassab pushes his family's luggage at Beirut international airport. In Beirut, the family lived in a small, dingy apartment in a suburb. Nizar was not able to find a job, he said. Their son, 22, worked at a factory to make rent while their daughter, 18, worked to cover food and living expenses. "We had waited a long time, and our situation here is really bad," he said. "My children don't have a future here. So I was forced to let them go." REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir
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The Qassab family pose with their luggage at Beirut international airport. The Qassab family first left their home when unidentified men tried to kidnap Amira at the school where she worked as a janitor. "Daesh came and kicked us out, so we fled further to the north," said Nizar, using an Arabic acronym for Islamic State. They trekked through Iraq, staying in Erbil and Dohuk, and ended up in Beirut in 2014. "I feared for my wife and children. We sold everything we had and came here," he said.

REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir

The Qassab family pose with their luggage at Beirut international airport. The Qassab family first left their home when unidentified men tried to kidnap Amira at the school where she worked as a janitor. "Daesh came and kicked us out, so we fled...more

The Qassab family pose with their luggage at Beirut international airport. The Qassab family first left their home when unidentified men tried to kidnap Amira at the school where she worked as a janitor. "Daesh came and kicked us out, so we fled further to the north," said Nizar, using an Arabic acronym for Islamic State. They trekked through Iraq, staying in Erbil and Dohuk, and ended up in Beirut in 2014. "I feared for my wife and children. We sold everything we had and came here," he said. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir
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Nizar al-Qassab sees his daughter off at Beirut international airport. The family had barely gotten some respite from the instability of the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq before the threat of Islamic State militants emerged, Nizar said. They no longer cared where they ended up, his wife added, they just wanted to find some peace. "My children are drained. They worked just to pay the rent. We barely made a living," Nizar added. "I can't go to America anymore. I don't know why...I'm parting with my family," said Nizar , bursting into tears. "How am I going to live alone?"

REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir

Nizar al-Qassab sees his daughter off at Beirut international airport. The family had barely gotten some respite from the instability of the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq before the threat of Islamic State militants emerged, Nizar said. They no...more

Nizar al-Qassab sees his daughter off at Beirut international airport. The family had barely gotten some respite from the instability of the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq before the threat of Islamic State militants emerged, Nizar said. They no longer cared where they ended up, his wife added, they just wanted to find some peace. "My children are drained. They worked just to pay the rent. We barely made a living," Nizar added. "I can't go to America anymore. I don't know why...I'm parting with my family," said Nizar , bursting into tears. "How am I going to live alone?" REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir
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Amira Al-Qassab is reunited with her son Rami after arriving with her other children at Detroit Metro Airport in Romulus, Michigan. The Qassabs' eldest son Rami, 26, had already resettled to Michigan two months earlier to find them all an apartment. "He told us America is beautiful," Amira said. "But it takes some time to settle in."

REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

Amira Al-Qassab is reunited with her son Rami after arriving with her other children at Detroit Metro Airport in Romulus, Michigan. The Qassabs' eldest son Rami, 26, had already resettled to Michigan two months earlier to find them all an apartment....more

Amira Al-Qassab is reunited with her son Rami after arriving with her other children at Detroit Metro Airport in Romulus, Michigan. The Qassabs' eldest son Rami, 26, had already resettled to Michigan two months earlier to find them all an apartment. "He told us America is beautiful," Amira said. "But it takes some time to settle in." REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
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Amira Al-Qassab wipes tears from her eye as her daughter cries while thinking of her father who was left behind in Lebanon because he could not get a visa to come with them, as they arrive at Detroit Metro Airport. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

Amira Al-Qassab wipes tears from her eye as her daughter cries while thinking of her father who was left behind in Lebanon because he could not get a visa to come with them, as they arrive at Detroit Metro Airport. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

Amira Al-Qassab wipes tears from her eye as her daughter cries while thinking of her father who was left behind in Lebanon because he could not get a visa to come with them, as they arrive at Detroit Metro Airport. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
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Amira Al-Qassab (2nd R) and four of her children are reunited with her son Rami as he uses his phone to Facetime the event to a relative as they arrive at Detroit Metro Airport. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

Amira Al-Qassab (2nd R) and four of her children are reunited with her son Rami as he uses his phone to Facetime the event to a relative as they arrive at Detroit Metro Airport. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

Amira Al-Qassab (2nd R) and four of her children are reunited with her son Rami as he uses his phone to Facetime the event to a relative as they arrive at Detroit Metro Airport. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
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Rami Al-Qassab (R) hugs his brother after being reunited with their mother Amira (L) and siblings after they arrived at Detroit Metro Airport. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

Rami Al-Qassab (R) hugs his brother after being reunited with their mother Amira (L) and siblings after they arrived at Detroit Metro Airport. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

Rami Al-Qassab (R) hugs his brother after being reunited with their mother Amira (L) and siblings after they arrived at Detroit Metro Airport. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
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Amira Al-Qassab (R) and three of her children are greeted by a relative picking them up at Detroit Metro Airport. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

Amira Al-Qassab (R) and three of her children are greeted by a relative picking them up at Detroit Metro Airport. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

Amira Al-Qassab (R) and three of her children are greeted by a relative picking them up at Detroit Metro Airport. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
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Amira Al-Qassab stands outside with two of her children as a relative picks them up at Detroit Metro Airport. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

Amira Al-Qassab stands outside with two of her children as a relative picks them up at Detroit Metro Airport. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

Amira Al-Qassab stands outside with two of her children as a relative picks them up at Detroit Metro Airport. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
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