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Pictures | Wed Oct 19, 2016 | 12:15am BST

New life for Calais 'jungle' residents

An Afghan adolescent migrant waves from a van as he departs with six others from the emergency shelter for minors in Saint Omer, France as they leave for Britain. A first busload of children arrived in Britain on Monday from the "Jungle" camp near the French port of Calais as the British government started to act on its commitment to take in unaccompanied migrant children before the camp is destroyed.

REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

An Afghan adolescent migrant waves from a van as he departs with six others from the emergency shelter for minors in Saint Omer, France as they leave for Britain. A first busload of children arrived in Britain on Monday from the "Jungle" camp near...more

An Afghan adolescent migrant waves from a van as he departs with six others from the emergency shelter for minors in Saint Omer, France as they leave for Britain. A first busload of children arrived in Britain on Monday from the "Jungle" camp near the French port of Calais as the British government started to act on its commitment to take in unaccompanied migrant children before the camp is destroyed. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol
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Nasir, aged 23, a migrant from Afghanistan's Baghlan province, leaves his caravan and the "jungle" with his belongings in Calais. Nasir has lived in the jungle for nine months in an area of the camp where Afghan families with children have settled, most of them in caravans. Nasir and his wife Nabila travel to Merignac with their seven-month-old son, as part of a weekly voluntary re-settlement convoy leaving the Calais jungle migrant camp for destinations around France before it is dismantled. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

Nasir, aged 23, a migrant from Afghanistan's Baghlan province, leaves his caravan and the "jungle" with his belongings in Calais. Nasir has lived in the jungle for nine months in an area of the camp where Afghan families with children have settled,...more

Nasir, aged 23, a migrant from Afghanistan's Baghlan province, leaves his caravan and the "jungle" with his belongings in Calais. Nasir has lived in the jungle for nine months in an area of the camp where Afghan families with children have settled, most of them in caravans. Nasir and his wife Nabila travel to Merignac with their seven-month-old son, as part of a weekly voluntary re-settlement convoy leaving the Calais jungle migrant camp for destinations around France before it is dismantled. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol
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One of the first group of unaccompanied minors from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais to be brought to Britain embraces a relative after he was processed at an immigration centre in Croydon, south London. French President Francois Hollande, facing an election in April, has promised to shut down the camp under local pressure. His government has already started rehousing thousands of Jungle inhabitants in dozens of towns and villages across France.

REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

One of the first group of unaccompanied minors from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais to be brought to Britain embraces a relative after he was processed at an immigration centre in Croydon, south London. French President Francois Hollande, facing an...more

One of the first group of unaccompanied minors from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais to be brought to Britain embraces a relative after he was processed at an immigration centre in Croydon, south London. French President Francois Hollande, facing an election in April, has promised to shut down the camp under local pressure. His government has already started rehousing thousands of Jungle inhabitants in dozens of towns and villages across France. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
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A group of migrants carry their belongings as they depart the Calais camp called the 'Jungle" to take classes at Lille University, in France. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

A group of migrants carry their belongings as they depart the Calais camp called the 'Jungle" to take classes at Lille University, in France. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

A group of migrants carry their belongings as they depart the Calais camp called the 'Jungle" to take classes at Lille University, in France. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol
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Afghan adolescent migrants gather as they leave the emergency shelter for minors in Saint Omer, France, to travel to Britain. Regarding the specific issue of unaccompanied children and teenagers who have fled war zones such as Afghanistan, Syria and Sudan, the transfers to Britain are taking place under EU family reunification rules known as the Dublin regulations.

REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

Afghan adolescent migrants gather as they leave the emergency shelter for minors in Saint Omer, France, to travel to Britain. Regarding the specific issue of unaccompanied children and teenagers who have fled war zones such as Afghanistan, Syria and...more

Afghan adolescent migrants gather as they leave the emergency shelter for minors in Saint Omer, France, to travel to Britain. Regarding the specific issue of unaccompanied children and teenagers who have fled war zones such as Afghanistan, Syria and Sudan, the transfers to Britain are taking place under EU family reunification rules known as the Dublin regulations. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol
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A member of a group of unaccompanied minors from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais is escorted onto a bus after being processed at an immigration centre after his arrival in Britain, in Croydon, south London. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

A member of a group of unaccompanied minors from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais is escorted onto a bus after being processed at an immigration centre after his arrival in Britain, in Croydon, south London. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

A member of a group of unaccompanied minors from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais is escorted onto a bus after being processed at an immigration centre after his arrival in Britain, in Croydon, south London. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
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An Afghan migrant adolescent leaves his room at the emergency shelter for minors in Saint Omer, France, as he prepares to travel to Britain. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

An Afghan migrant adolescent leaves his room at the emergency shelter for minors in Saint Omer, France, as he prepares to travel to Britain. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

An Afghan migrant adolescent leaves his room at the emergency shelter for minors in Saint Omer, France, as he prepares to travel to Britain. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol
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Two members a group of unaccompanied minors (R and 2nd R) from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais stand outside an immigration centre after being processed after their arrival in Britain, in Croydon, south London, October 18, 2016. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

Two members a group of unaccompanied minors (R and 2nd R) from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais stand outside an immigration centre after being processed after their arrival in Britain, in Croydon, south London, October 18, 2016. REUTERS/Peter...more

Two members a group of unaccompanied minors (R and 2nd R) from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais stand outside an immigration centre after being processed after their arrival in Britain, in Croydon, south London, October 18, 2016. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
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Nasir (2ndR), aged 23, a migrant from Afghanistan's Baghlan province, speaks with Romain Cordier, an OFII agent, outside his caravan as his wife (not pictured) holds their baby son in Calais. Nasir has lived in the jungle for nine months in an area of the camp where Afghan families with children have settled, most of them in caravans. Nasir and his wife Nabila travel to Merignac with their seven-month-old son, as part of a weekly voluntary re-settlement convoy leaving the Calais jungle migrant camp for destinations around France before it is dismantled. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

Nasir (2ndR), aged 23, a migrant from Afghanistan's Baghlan province, speaks with Romain Cordier, an OFII agent, outside his caravan as his wife (not pictured) holds their baby son in Calais. Nasir has lived in the jungle for nine months in an area...more

Nasir (2ndR), aged 23, a migrant from Afghanistan's Baghlan province, speaks with Romain Cordier, an OFII agent, outside his caravan as his wife (not pictured) holds their baby son in Calais. Nasir has lived in the jungle for nine months in an area of the camp where Afghan families with children have settled, most of them in caravans. Nasir and his wife Nabila travel to Merignac with their seven-month-old son, as part of a weekly voluntary re-settlement convoy leaving the Calais jungle migrant camp for destinations around France before it is dismantled. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol
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One of the first group of unaccompanied minors from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais to be brought to Britain waves at a relative after he was processed at an immigration centre in Croydon, south London. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

One of the first group of unaccompanied minors from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais to be brought to Britain waves at a relative after he was processed at an immigration centre in Croydon, south London. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

One of the first group of unaccompanied minors from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais to be brought to Britain waves at a relative after he was processed at an immigration centre in Croydon, south London. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
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UK Border Force staff escort a group of unaccompanied minors from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais as they arrive at an immigration centre in Croydon, south London. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

UK Border Force staff escort a group of unaccompanied minors from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais as they arrive at an immigration centre in Croydon, south London. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

UK Border Force staff escort a group of unaccompanied minors from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais as they arrive at an immigration centre in Croydon, south London. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
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UK Border Force staff escort the first group of unaccompanied minors from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais to be brought to Britain as they arrive at an immigration centre in Croydon, south London. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

UK Border Force staff escort the first group of unaccompanied minors from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais to be brought to Britain as they arrive at an immigration centre in Croydon, south London. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

UK Border Force staff escort the first group of unaccompanied minors from the Jungle migrant camp in Calais to be brought to Britain as they arrive at an immigration centre in Croydon, south London. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
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Qadri Fazlullah (R), a migrant from Afghanistan, poses in front of the reception centre in Merignac, a suburb of Bordeaux, southwestern France, where he lives after resettling three months ago from the Calais jungle camp. A tightening of security in Calais makes it difficult to slip through toward Britain, and refugees are being persuaded to apply for asylum in France instead of attempting the perilous journey to Britain, often in the back of trucks.

REUTERS/Regis Duvignau

Qadri Fazlullah (R), a migrant from Afghanistan, poses in front of the reception centre in Merignac, a suburb of Bordeaux, southwestern France, where he lives after resettling three months ago from the Calais jungle camp. A tightening of security in...more

Qadri Fazlullah (R), a migrant from Afghanistan, poses in front of the reception centre in Merignac, a suburb of Bordeaux, southwestern France, where he lives after resettling three months ago from the Calais jungle camp. A tightening of security in Calais makes it difficult to slip through toward Britain, and refugees are being persuaded to apply for asylum in France instead of attempting the perilous journey to Britain, often in the back of trucks. REUTERS/Regis Duvignau
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A migrant stands near a suitcase with his belongings before departing the Calais camp called the "Jungle" to take classes at Lille University, in France. Given that Britain remains a favored destination for many refugees and migrants due to family links, the language they are often more likely to speak than French, and higher prospects of employment, charities say many will still come to Calais even if the Jungle is no more.

REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

A migrant stands near a suitcase with his belongings before departing the Calais camp called the "Jungle" to take classes at Lille University, in France. Given that Britain remains a favored destination for many refugees and migrants due to family...more

A migrant stands near a suitcase with his belongings before departing the Calais camp called the "Jungle" to take classes at Lille University, in France. Given that Britain remains a favored destination for many refugees and migrants due to family links, the language they are often more likely to speak than French, and higher prospects of employment, charities say many will still come to Calais even if the Jungle is no more. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol
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A migrant stands at the entry of a the makeshift shop in the northern part of the "jungle", in Calais. The message reads, "The people living in this building know that a court decision has banned all commerce. The restaurant/shop doesn't exist anymore. They don't have alternative residence. This is their only place to live". REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

A migrant stands at the entry of a the makeshift shop in the northern part of the "jungle", in Calais. The message reads, "The people living in this building know that a court decision has banned all commerce. The restaurant/shop doesn't exist...more

A migrant stands at the entry of a the makeshift shop in the northern part of the "jungle", in Calais. The message reads, "The people living in this building know that a court decision has banned all commerce. The restaurant/shop doesn't exist anymore. They don't have alternative residence. This is their only place to live". REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol
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Jamal, aged 14, an adolescent migrant from Afghanistan, rides a bicycle after bidding farewell to a family that left the jungle in Calais as part of a weekly voluntary re-settlement convoy. France promised last year to take in 30,000 refugees stranded in countries bordering on Syria, as well as in Greece and Italy as part of an EU-wide resettlement plan. Some 4,000 have been taken in so far.

REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

Jamal, aged 14, an adolescent migrant from Afghanistan, rides a bicycle after bidding farewell to a family that left the jungle in Calais as part of a weekly voluntary re-settlement convoy. France promised last year to take in 30,000 refugees...more

Jamal, aged 14, an adolescent migrant from Afghanistan, rides a bicycle after bidding farewell to a family that left the jungle in Calais as part of a weekly voluntary re-settlement convoy. France promised last year to take in 30,000 refugees stranded in countries bordering on Syria, as well as in Greece and Italy as part of an EU-wide resettlement plan. Some 4,000 have been taken in so far. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol
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Migrants and no border activists stand on a lookout tower built in the northern part of the "Jungle", in Calais. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

Migrants and no border activists stand on a lookout tower built in the northern part of the "Jungle", in Calais. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

Migrants and no border activists stand on a lookout tower built in the northern part of the "Jungle", in Calais. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol
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A migrant walks past tents in the "Jungle" in Calais. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

A migrant walks past tents in the "Jungle" in Calais. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

A migrant walks past tents in the "Jungle" in Calais. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol
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Heavy machinery and construction workers are seen along a motorway stretch in Calais as work continues to build a wall to secure the approach from migrants trying to reach Britain on lorries, in Calais. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

Heavy machinery and construction workers are seen along a motorway stretch in Calais as work continues to build a wall to secure the approach from migrants trying to reach Britain on lorries, in Calais. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

Heavy machinery and construction workers are seen along a motorway stretch in Calais as work continues to build a wall to secure the approach from migrants trying to reach Britain on lorries, in Calais. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol
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A view shows makeshift shelters, tents and containers in the "Jungle" in Calais. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

A view shows makeshift shelters, tents and containers in the "Jungle" in Calais. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

A view shows makeshift shelters, tents and containers in the "Jungle" in Calais. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol
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