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Pictures | Thu Mar 1, 2012 | 1:10pm GMT

Shipbreakers

<p>Laborers climb up an iron chain and ladder to break down a ship for scrap metal at the Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. Fifteen thousand Pakistanis risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day.  REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro </p>

Laborers climb up an iron chain and ladder to break down a ship for scrap metal at the Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. Fifteen thousand Pakistanis risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at...more

Laborers climb up an iron chain and ladder to break down a ship for scrap metal at the Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. Fifteen thousand Pakistanis risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

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<p>A laborer uses a blow torch to separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. 
REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro </p>

A laborer uses a blow torch to separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

A laborer uses a blow torch to separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

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<p>Laborers transport supplies to a ship by a makeshift cable carriage to separate it into scrap metal at the Gaddani shipbreaking yard early in the morning, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011.   REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro </p>

Laborers transport supplies to a ship by a makeshift cable carriage to separate it into scrap metal at the Gaddani shipbreaking yard early in the morning, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Laborers transport supplies to a ship by a makeshift cable carriage to separate it into scrap metal at the Gaddani shipbreaking yard early in the morning, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

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<p>A laborer climbs a ladder held by others, while working onboard a ship, separating it into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro </p>

A laborer climbs a ladder held by others, while working onboard a ship, separating it into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

A laborer climbs a ladder held by others, while working onboard a ship, separating it into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

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<p>Laborers rest during a break while working on a ship separating parts of it into scrap metal at the Gaddani shipbreaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro </p>

Laborers rest during a break while working on a ship separating parts of it into scrap metal at the Gaddani shipbreaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Laborers rest during a break while working on a ship separating parts of it into scrap metal at the Gaddani shipbreaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

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<p>Laborers pull an iron rope before separating a portion of a ship into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. 
REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro </p>

Laborers pull an iron rope before separating a portion of a ship into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Laborers pull an iron rope before separating a portion of a ship into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

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<p>A laborer is silhouetted against the sun as he holds a gas blow torch while working to separate parts of a ship into scrap metal at the Gaddani shipbreaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro</p>

A laborer is silhouetted against the sun as he holds a gas blow torch while working to separate parts of a ship into scrap metal at the Gaddani shipbreaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

A laborer is silhouetted against the sun as he holds a gas blow torch while working to separate parts of a ship into scrap metal at the Gaddani shipbreaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

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<p>A laborer connects chains before separating parts of a ship for scrap metal at the Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro</p>

A laborer connects chains before separating parts of a ship for scrap metal at the Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

A laborer connects chains before separating parts of a ship for scrap metal at the Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

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<p>Laborers eat during their lunch break at a nearby makeshift hotel at the Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi on November 24, 2011.  REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro </p>

Laborers eat during their lunch break at a nearby makeshift hotel at the Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi on November 24, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Laborers eat during their lunch break at a nearby makeshift hotel at the Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi on November 24, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

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<p>Mehmood, 20, a laborer uses his mobile while resting at his makeshift cabin during lunch break while working at the Gaddani shipbreaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011.   REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro </p>

Mehmood, 20, a laborer uses his mobile while resting at his makeshift cabin during lunch break while working at the Gaddani shipbreaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Mehmood, 20, a laborer uses his mobile while resting at his makeshift cabin during lunch break while working at the Gaddani shipbreaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

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<p>Laborers stand on a makeshift cable carriage which transports them onto a ship to separate it into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro </p>

Laborers stand on a makeshift cable carriage which transports them onto a ship to separate it into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Laborers stand on a makeshift cable carriage which transports them onto a ship to separate it into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

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<p>Workers weld a wrecked part of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh August 19, 2009. Bangladesh is dependent on shipbreaking for its domestic steel requirements. The  Chittagong shipbreaking yard is a highly polluted coastal belt of 20 km. The number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region, according to environmental organizations. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj </p>

Workers weld a wrecked part of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh August 19, 2009. Bangladesh is dependent on shipbreaking for its domestic steel requirements. The Chittagong shipbreaking yard is a highly polluted coastal belt...more

Workers weld a wrecked part of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh August 19, 2009. Bangladesh is dependent on shipbreaking for its domestic steel requirements. The Chittagong shipbreaking yard is a highly polluted coastal belt of 20 km. The number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region, according to environmental organizations. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

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<p>Workers work at a ship breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj </p>

Workers work at a ship breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Workers work at a ship breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

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<p>Workers carry a piece of iron at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj </p>

Workers carry a piece of iron at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Workers carry a piece of iron at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

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<p>Workers rest after work at a ship breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj </p>

Workers rest after work at a ship breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Workers rest after work at a ship breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

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<p>Workers dismantle a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western Indian city of Ahmedabad, in this February 25, 2009 file photo.  In Alang, home to the world's largest ship breaking facility on the coast of Gujarat state, the financial year to April will be one of its best ever, as a slowdown in global trade and lower freight rates mean ships are being scrapped faster.   REUTERS/Amit Dave/Files </p>

Workers dismantle a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western Indian city of Ahmedabad, in this February 25, 2009 file photo. In Alang, home to the world's largest ship breaking facility on the coast...more

Workers dismantle a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western Indian city of Ahmedabad, in this February 25, 2009 file photo. In Alang, home to the world's largest ship breaking facility on the coast of Gujarat state, the financial year to April will be one of its best ever, as a slowdown in global trade and lower freight rates mean ships are being scrapped faster. REUTERS/Amit Dave/Files

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<p>A view of ships being decommissioned at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western Indian city of Ahmedabad, in this February 25, 2009 file photo.    REUTERS/Amit Dave/Files </p>

A view of ships being decommissioned at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western Indian city of Ahmedabad, in this February 25, 2009 file photo. REUTERS/Amit Dave/Files

A view of ships being decommissioned at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western Indian city of Ahmedabad, in this February 25, 2009 file photo. REUTERS/Amit Dave/Files

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<p>A worker holds on to a ship railing as he rests before resuming work at a ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. REUTERS/Arko Datta </p>

A worker holds on to a ship railing as he rests before resuming work at a ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. REUTERS/Arko Datta

A worker holds on to a ship railing as he rests before resuming work at a ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. REUTERS/Arko Datta

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<p>An Indian woman cleans metal scraps salvaged from a ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. The scraps salvaged from the ship repair dock are then sold to recycling companies. Ship-breaking is one of the most dangerous jobs, with workers at risk of accidents and exposure to toxins whose harmful effects emerge years later, according to ILO experts on safety and occupational health.   REUTERS/Anuruddha Lokuhapuarachchi </p>

An Indian woman cleans metal scraps salvaged from a ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. The scraps salvaged from the ship repair dock are then sold to recycling companies. Ship-breaking is one of the most dangerous jobs, with workers at...more

An Indian woman cleans metal scraps salvaged from a ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. The scraps salvaged from the ship repair dock are then sold to recycling companies. Ship-breaking is one of the most dangerous jobs, with workers at risk of accidents and exposure to toxins whose harmful effects emerge years later, according to ILO experts on safety and occupational health. REUTERS/Anuruddha Lokuhapuarachchi

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<p>Pakistani laborers take a break at Gaddani shipbreaking yard, 60 km from Karachi September 13, 2003.  REUTERS/Zahid Hussein</p>

Pakistani laborers take a break at Gaddani shipbreaking yard, 60 km from Karachi September 13, 2003. REUTERS/Zahid Hussein

Pakistani laborers take a break at Gaddani shipbreaking yard, 60 km from Karachi September 13, 2003. REUTERS/Zahid Hussein

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<p>Pakistani laborers work at Gaddani shipbreaking yard, 60 km from Karachi September 13, 2003.   REUTERS/Zahid Hussein</p>

Pakistani laborers work at Gaddani shipbreaking yard, 60 km from Karachi September 13, 2003. REUTERS/Zahid Hussein

Pakistani laborers work at Gaddani shipbreaking yard, 60 km from Karachi September 13, 2003. REUTERS/Zahid Hussein

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<p>A scrapped ship awaits dismantling at a shipbreaking yard on a polluted beach in Chittagong November 15, 2003.  REUTERS/Rafiqur Rahman</p>

A scrapped ship awaits dismantling at a shipbreaking yard on a polluted beach in Chittagong November 15, 2003. REUTERS/Rafiqur Rahman

A scrapped ship awaits dismantling at a shipbreaking yard on a polluted beach in Chittagong November 15, 2003. REUTERS/Rafiqur Rahman

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