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Trump's political picks

Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson is secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

Carson, who ran for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination and later endorsed Trump, becomes the only African-American in the Trump cabinet.

During his confirmation hearing in January, Carson, 65, told the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs that he would monitor any potential conflicts of interest between his agency and properties controlled by Trump.

He also told lawmakers he was fit to lead HUD, an agency whose mission includes helping the poor get housing, even though he has sometimes criticized its work.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson is secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Carson, who ran for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination and later endorsed Trump, becomes the only African-American in the Trump...more

Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson is secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Carson, who ran for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination and later endorsed Trump, becomes the only African-American in the Trump cabinet. During his confirmation hearing in January, Carson, 65, told the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs that he would monitor any potential conflicts of interest between his agency and properties controlled by Trump. He also told lawmakers he was fit to lead HUD, an agency whose mission includes helping the poor get housing, even though he has sometimes criticized its work. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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Former Texas Governor Rick Perry will head the Department of Energy. His rise to America's top energy official came despite opposition from Democrats worried about his ties to oil companies, his doubts about the science of climate change, and the fact that he once called for the department's total elimination -- a comment he has since said he regrets.

As energy secretary, Perry would lead a vast scientific research operation credited with helping trigger a drilling boom and advancements in energy efficiency and renewables technology, and would oversee America's nuclear arsenal.

In his Senate confirmation hearing, Perry said much of his focus running the department would be in renewing the country's nuclear weapons arsenal. Trump wants to ensure the arsenal is at "the top of the pack" and said the United States had fallen behind in its nuclear weapons capacity.

Democratic lawmakers expressed worry Perry would weaken the department's functions and potentially target its army of scientists focused on climate and clean energy research. Perry sought to reassure them saying he would protect scientists and the growing renewable energy industry.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Former Texas Governor Rick Perry will head the Department of Energy. His rise to America's top energy official came despite opposition from Democrats worried about his ties to oil companies, his doubts about the science of climate change, and the...more

Former Texas Governor Rick Perry will head the Department of Energy. His rise to America's top energy official came despite opposition from Democrats worried about his ties to oil companies, his doubts about the science of climate change, and the fact that he once called for the department's total elimination -- a comment he has since said he regrets. As energy secretary, Perry would lead a vast scientific research operation credited with helping trigger a drilling boom and advancements in energy efficiency and renewables technology, and would oversee America's nuclear arsenal. In his Senate confirmation hearing, Perry said much of his focus running the department would be in renewing the country's nuclear weapons arsenal. Trump wants to ensure the arsenal is at "the top of the pack" and said the United States had fallen behind in its nuclear weapons capacity. Democratic lawmakers expressed worry Perry would weaken the department's functions and potentially target its army of scientists focused on climate and clean energy research. Perry sought to reassure them saying he would protect scientists and the growing renewable energy industry. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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2 / 27
Ryan Zinke, a U.S. Representative from coal-producing Montana, was confirmed to head the Interior Department as the White House seeks to increase fossil fuel production on federal lands.

The former Navy SEAL commander is an avid hunter and angler who is popular with many outdoor enthusiasts, including Trump's son Donald Jr.

Many environmentalists, however, are concerned about Zinke's zeal for exploiting coal and other fossil fuels. As a one-term Congressman, Zinke worked to boost mining, including supporting an effort to end a coal leasing moratorium on federal lands. Forty percent of U.S. output comes from federal lands that are mostly in Wyoming and Montana.

In his confirmation hearing in January Zinke said he would consider an expansion of energy drilling and mining on federal lands but would ensure that sensitive areas were protected.

Zinke will head an agency that employs more than 70,000 people across the country and oversees more than 20 percent of federal land, including national parks such as Yellowstone and Yosemite.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Ryan Zinke, a U.S. Representative from coal-producing Montana, was confirmed to head the Interior Department as the White House seeks to increase fossil fuel production on federal lands. The former Navy SEAL commander is an avid hunter and angler...more

Ryan Zinke, a U.S. Representative from coal-producing Montana, was confirmed to head the Interior Department as the White House seeks to increase fossil fuel production on federal lands. The former Navy SEAL commander is an avid hunter and angler who is popular with many outdoor enthusiasts, including Trump's son Donald Jr. Many environmentalists, however, are concerned about Zinke's zeal for exploiting coal and other fossil fuels. As a one-term Congressman, Zinke worked to boost mining, including supporting an effort to end a coal leasing moratorium on federal lands. Forty percent of U.S. output comes from federal lands that are mostly in Wyoming and Montana. In his confirmation hearing in January Zinke said he would consider an expansion of energy drilling and mining on federal lands but would ensure that sensitive areas were protected. Zinke will head an agency that employs more than 70,000 people across the country and oversees more than 20 percent of federal land, including national parks such as Yellowstone and Yosemite. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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3 / 27
The U.S. Senate easily confirmed billionaire investor Wilbur Ross as U.S. commerce secretary with strong support from Democrats, installing President Donald Trump's top official on trade matters.

Part of that support stems from praise that Ross has drawn from the United Steelworkers union for his efforts in restructuring several bankrupt steel companies in the early 2000s, saving numerous plants and thousands of jobs.

But he also has come under criticism from some left-wing groups as another billionaire in a Trump cabinet that claims to be focused on the working class, and for being a "vulture" investor who has eliminated jobs. 

The 79-year-old investor will oversee a sprawling agency with nearly 44,000 employees responsible for combating the dumping of imports below cost into U.S. markets, collecting census and critical economic data, weather forecasting, fisheries management, promoting the United States to foreign investors and regulating the export of sensitive technologies.


REUTERS/Carlos Barria

The U.S. Senate easily confirmed billionaire investor Wilbur Ross as U.S. commerce secretary with strong support from Democrats, installing President Donald Trump's top official on trade matters. Part of that support stems from praise that Ross has...more

The U.S. Senate easily confirmed billionaire investor Wilbur Ross as U.S. commerce secretary with strong support from Democrats, installing President Donald Trump's top official on trade matters. Part of that support stems from praise that Ross has drawn from the United Steelworkers union for his efforts in restructuring several bankrupt steel companies in the early 2000s, saving numerous plants and thousands of jobs. But he also has come under criticism from some left-wing groups as another billionaire in a Trump cabinet that claims to be focused on the working class, and for being a "vulture" investor who has eliminated jobs. The 79-year-old investor will oversee a sprawling agency with nearly 44,000 employees responsible for combating the dumping of imports below cost into U.S. markets, collecting census and critical economic data, weather forecasting, fisheries management, promoting the United States to foreign investors and regulating the export of sensitive technologies. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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4 / 27
President Donald Trump named Lieutenant General Herbert Raymond McMaster as his new national security adviser.

McMaster is a highly regarded military tactician and strategic thinker, but his selection surprised some observers who wondered how the officer, whose Army career stalled at times for his questioning of authority, would deal with a White House that has not welcomed criticism.

The 54-year-old West Point graduate was awarded a Silver Star after he commanded a small troop of the U.S. 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment that destroyed a much larger Iraqi Republican Guard force in 1991, in what many consider the biggest tank battle since World War Two.

McMaster's preparation in the second Iraq War is legendary: He trained his soldiers in Iraqi culture, the differences among Sunnis, Shi'ites and Turkomen, and had them read books on the history of the region and counterinsurgency strategy.

REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

President Donald Trump named Lieutenant General Herbert Raymond McMaster as his new national security adviser. McMaster is a highly regarded military tactician and strategic thinker, but his selection surprised some observers who wondered how the...more

President Donald Trump named Lieutenant General Herbert Raymond McMaster as his new national security adviser. McMaster is a highly regarded military tactician and strategic thinker, but his selection surprised some observers who wondered how the officer, whose Army career stalled at times for his questioning of authority, would deal with a White House that has not welcomed criticism. The 54-year-old West Point graduate was awarded a Silver Star after he commanded a small troop of the U.S. 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment that destroyed a much larger Iraqi Republican Guard force in 1991, in what many consider the biggest tank battle since World War Two. McMaster's preparation in the second Iraq War is legendary: He trained his soldiers in Iraqi culture, the differences among Sunnis, Shi'ites and Turkomen, and had them read books on the history of the region and counterinsurgency strategy. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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5 / 27
The Senate confirmed Scott Pruitt to run the Environmental Protection Agency over the objections of Democrats and environmentalists worried he will gut the agency, as the administration readies executive orders to ease regulation on drillers and miners.

The nomination of Pruitt, who sued the EPA more than a dozen times on behalf of his oil-producing state and has doubted the science of climate change, upset many former and current agency employees.

Pruitt's confirmation reinforces expectations on both sides of the political divide that America will cede its position as a leader in the global fight on climate change.

Trump is likely to issue executive orders as soon as next week to reshape the EPA, sources said.

Trump has promised to kill Obama's Clean Power Plan, currently held up in the courts, that aims to slash carbon emissions from coal and natural gas fired power plants.

Trump also wants to give states more authority over environmental issues by striking down federal regulations on drilling technologies and getting rid of an Obama rule that sought to clarify the EPA's jurisdiction over streams and rivers.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

The Senate confirmed Scott Pruitt to run the Environmental Protection Agency over the objections of Democrats and environmentalists worried he will gut the agency, as the administration readies executive orders to ease regulation on drillers and...more

The Senate confirmed Scott Pruitt to run the Environmental Protection Agency over the objections of Democrats and environmentalists worried he will gut the agency, as the administration readies executive orders to ease regulation on drillers and miners. The nomination of Pruitt, who sued the EPA more than a dozen times on behalf of his oil-producing state and has doubted the science of climate change, upset many former and current agency employees. Pruitt's confirmation reinforces expectations on both sides of the political divide that America will cede its position as a leader in the global fight on climate change. Trump is likely to issue executive orders as soon as next week to reshape the EPA, sources said. Trump has promised to kill Obama's Clean Power Plan, currently held up in the courts, that aims to slash carbon emissions from coal and natural gas fired power plants. Trump also wants to give states more authority over environmental issues by striking down federal regulations on drilling technologies and getting rid of an Obama rule that sought to clarify the EPA's jurisdiction over streams and rivers. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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6 / 27
South Carolina congressman Mick Mulvaney was confirmed as White House budget director.

An outspoken budget hawk who has been branded by Democrats as a threat to popular social programs including Social Security and Medicare, Mulvaney entered the House of Representatives as a Tea Party candidate in 2011 and is a member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus.

Democrats have also criticized him for failing to pay more than $15,000 in taxes related to a household employee until after he was nominated.

Before the Senate vote, Senator John McCain, who chairs the Senate Armed Services Committee that oversees defense programs, blasted Mulvaney in a Senate floor speech, saying the nominee had pursued "reckless budget strategies" that led to a partial government shutdown in 2013.

McCain also lashed out at Mulvaney's efforts on military affairs, including a vote in 2011 that the Arizona senator said would have brought the immediate withdrawal of all U.S. troops from Afghanistan, ending a mission to prevent it from "becoming a safe haven for terrorists."

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

South Carolina congressman Mick Mulvaney was confirmed as White House budget director. An outspoken budget hawk who has been branded by Democrats as a threat to popular social programs including Social Security and Medicare, Mulvaney entered the...more

South Carolina congressman Mick Mulvaney was confirmed as White House budget director. An outspoken budget hawk who has been branded by Democrats as a threat to popular social programs including Social Security and Medicare, Mulvaney entered the House of Representatives as a Tea Party candidate in 2011 and is a member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus. Democrats have also criticized him for failing to pay more than $15,000 in taxes related to a household employee until after he was nominated. Before the Senate vote, Senator John McCain, who chairs the Senate Armed Services Committee that oversees defense programs, blasted Mulvaney in a Senate floor speech, saying the nominee had pursued "reckless budget strategies" that led to a partial government shutdown in 2013. McCain also lashed out at Mulvaney's efforts on military affairs, including a vote in 2011 that the Arizona senator said would have brought the immediate withdrawal of all U.S. troops from Afghanistan, ending a mission to prevent it from "becoming a safe haven for terrorists." REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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7 / 27
Former Goldman Sachs banker Steven Mnuchin has been confirmed as Treasury secretary, the Trump administration's point-man on tax reform, financial deregulation and economic diplomacy efforts. 

The vote to confirm Mnuchin was 53-47, with all but one Democrat opposing him over his handling of thousands of foreclosures as head of OneWest Bank after the 2007-2009 housing collapse.

Trump has pledged to roll back the stricter financial regulation under the Dodd-Frank reform law enacted after the financial crisis, pursue tougher trade policies on China and Mexico to reduce U.S. trade deficits, and reduce business tax rates.

Mnuchin faces immediate challenges with the March 15 expiration of a U.S. debt ceiling suspension, ushering in the threat of a new default showdown, and a March 17 meeting of finance ministers from the Group of 20 major economies, where he will face tough questions about Trump's plans to increase trade protections.

REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Former Goldman Sachs banker Steven Mnuchin has been confirmed as Treasury secretary, the Trump administration's point-man on tax reform, financial deregulation and economic diplomacy efforts. The vote to confirm Mnuchin was 53-47, with all but one...more

Former Goldman Sachs banker Steven Mnuchin has been confirmed as Treasury secretary, the Trump administration's point-man on tax reform, financial deregulation and economic diplomacy efforts. The vote to confirm Mnuchin was 53-47, with all but one Democrat opposing him over his handling of thousands of foreclosures as head of OneWest Bank after the 2007-2009 housing collapse. Trump has pledged to roll back the stricter financial regulation under the Dodd-Frank reform law enacted after the financial crisis, pursue tougher trade policies on China and Mexico to reduce U.S. trade deficits, and reduce business tax rates. Mnuchin faces immediate challenges with the March 15 expiration of a U.S. debt ceiling suspension, ushering in the threat of a new default showdown, and a March 17 meeting of finance ministers from the Group of 20 major economies, where he will face tough questions about Trump's plans to increase trade protections. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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8 / 27
Tom Price was sworn in as secretary of health, putting in place a determined opponent of Obamacare to help President Donald Trump fulfill his pledge to dismantle his predecessor's law and reshape the country's healthcare system.

As head of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Price has the authority to rewrite rules implementing the 2010 Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. He could move quickly to rework the regulations while waiting for Republicans in Congress to keep their pledge to scrap the law entirely.

Trump signed an order on his first day in office to freeze regulations and take other steps to weaken the law enacted by former President Barack Obama, a directive that will fall largely on Price.

Price's nomination was dogged by questions about his trading in hundreds of thousands of dollars in health company stocks while working on healthcare legislation. Democrats also criticized Price for his opposition to Obamacare, his ideas about restructuring the Medicare program for the elderly and disabled, and his opposition to Planned Parenthood.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Tom Price was sworn in as secretary of health, putting in place a determined opponent of Obamacare to help President Donald Trump fulfill his pledge to dismantle his predecessor's law and reshape the country's healthcare system. As head of the...more

Tom Price was sworn in as secretary of health, putting in place a determined opponent of Obamacare to help President Donald Trump fulfill his pledge to dismantle his predecessor's law and reshape the country's healthcare system. As head of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Price has the authority to rewrite rules implementing the 2010 Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. He could move quickly to rework the regulations while waiting for Republicans in Congress to keep their pledge to scrap the law entirely. Trump signed an order on his first day in office to freeze regulations and take other steps to weaken the law enacted by former President Barack Obama, a directive that will fall largely on Price. Price's nomination was dogged by questions about his trading in hundreds of thousands of dollars in health company stocks while working on healthcare legislation. Democrats also criticized Price for his opposition to Obamacare, his ideas about restructuring the Medicare program for the elderly and disabled, and his opposition to Planned Parenthood. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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9 / 27
A bitterly divided Senate confirmed Republican Senator Jeff Sessions as the next attorney general of the United States.

Sessions, a known immigration hardliner, will take the lead of the Justice Department as its lawyers are defending Trump's temporary entry ban on people from seven predominantly Muslim countries and all refugees.

Civil rights groups worry that the Justice Department's civil rights division will not be aggressive in prosecuting abuses under Sessions. They cite his failure to win Senate confirmation to become a federal judge in 1986 because of allegations he made racist remarks, including testimony that he had called an African-American prosecutor "boy," an allegation Sessions denied.

Sessions said at his hearing in 1986 that groups such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the American Civil Liberties Union could be considered "un-American." He also acknowledged he had called the Voting Rights Act of 1965 a "piece of intrusive legislation."

Sessions has pushed to curb immigration into the United States, including by those who enter legally on work permits. He has also voted against many measures to reduce sentences for prisoners.

REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

A bitterly divided Senate confirmed Republican Senator Jeff Sessions as the next attorney general of the United States. Sessions, a known immigration hardliner, will take the lead of the Justice Department as its lawyers are defending Trump's...more

A bitterly divided Senate confirmed Republican Senator Jeff Sessions as the next attorney general of the United States. Sessions, a known immigration hardliner, will take the lead of the Justice Department as its lawyers are defending Trump's temporary entry ban on people from seven predominantly Muslim countries and all refugees. Civil rights groups worry that the Justice Department's civil rights division will not be aggressive in prosecuting abuses under Sessions. They cite his failure to win Senate confirmation to become a federal judge in 1986 because of allegations he made racist remarks, including testimony that he had called an African-American prosecutor "boy," an allegation Sessions denied. Sessions said at his hearing in 1986 that groups such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the American Civil Liberties Union could be considered "un-American." He also acknowledged he had called the Voting Rights Act of 1965 a "piece of intrusive legislation." Sessions has pushed to curb immigration into the United States, including by those who enter legally on work permits. He has also voted against many measures to reduce sentences for prisoners. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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10 / 27
Billionaire Betsy DeVos was confirmed as the new Secretary of Education after Vice President Pence was called in to break a tie that threatened to defeat her in Senate.

DeVos is married to the heir and former chief executive of Amway, which sells household and personal care items. She is also the daughter of the founders of Prince Corp, a Michigan car parts supplier, and sister of Erik Prince, the founder of the security company formerly known as Blackwater USA, now called Academi.

DeVos has been an advocate of charter schools, which operate independently of school districts and frequently are run by corporations. Democrats are concerned she will promote charter schools in a way that would undercut public schools, which have long been the anchor of the U.S. education system.

Teachers unions, a major constituency for the Democratic Party, roundly opposed DeVos, a philanthropist and investor, to lead the department, which sets education policy for younger children and universities and also administers a college financial aid program of $1 trillion.

Only two Republicans joined the 46 Democrats and two independents in opposition to DeVos. Critics have called her unprepared to lead the Department of Education after a rocky Senate confirmation hearing.


REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Billionaire Betsy DeVos was confirmed as the new Secretary of Education after Vice President Pence was called in to break a tie that threatened to defeat her in Senate. DeVos is married to the heir and former chief executive of Amway, which sells...more

Billionaire Betsy DeVos was confirmed as the new Secretary of Education after Vice President Pence was called in to break a tie that threatened to defeat her in Senate. DeVos is married to the heir and former chief executive of Amway, which sells household and personal care items. She is also the daughter of the founders of Prince Corp, a Michigan car parts supplier, and sister of Erik Prince, the founder of the security company formerly known as Blackwater USA, now called Academi. DeVos has been an advocate of charter schools, which operate independently of school districts and frequently are run by corporations. Democrats are concerned she will promote charter schools in a way that would undercut public schools, which have long been the anchor of the U.S. education system. Teachers unions, a major constituency for the Democratic Party, roundly opposed DeVos, a philanthropist and investor, to lead the department, which sets education policy for younger children and universities and also administers a college financial aid program of $1 trillion. Only two Republicans joined the 46 Democrats and two independents in opposition to DeVos. Critics have called her unprepared to lead the Department of Education after a rocky Senate confirmation hearing. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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11 / 27
Senate confirmed Rex Tillerson as secretary of state, filling a key spot on Trump's national security team despite concerns about the former Exxon Mobil CEO's ties to Russia.

Tillerson's job as chief U.S. diplomat became harder before it even began because of White House moves that have antagonized Muslim nations, European allies, Mexico and U.S. bureaucrats, current and former U.S. officials said. He also inherits a messy globe with a civil war in Syria, nuclear-armed North Korea threatening to test an intercontinental ballistic missile and challenges from a rising China and an assertive Russia.

About 900 State Department officials signed a memo dissenting from Trump's executive order imposing a hold on refugees entering the U.S. and travel from seven countries, a source familiar with the document said, an unusual rebellion against a new president's policies.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Senate confirmed Rex Tillerson as secretary of state, filling a key spot on Trump's national security team despite concerns about the former Exxon Mobil CEO's ties to Russia. Tillerson's job as chief U.S. diplomat became harder before it even began...more

Senate confirmed Rex Tillerson as secretary of state, filling a key spot on Trump's national security team despite concerns about the former Exxon Mobil CEO's ties to Russia. Tillerson's job as chief U.S. diplomat became harder before it even began because of White House moves that have antagonized Muslim nations, European allies, Mexico and U.S. bureaucrats, current and former U.S. officials said. He also inherits a messy globe with a civil war in Syria, nuclear-armed North Korea threatening to test an intercontinental ballistic missile and challenges from a rising China and an assertive Russia. About 900 State Department officials signed a memo dissenting from Trump's executive order imposing a hold on refugees entering the U.S. and travel from seven countries, a source familiar with the document said, an unusual rebellion against a new president's policies. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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12 / 27
President Donald Trump nominated Neil Gorsuch for a lifetime job on the U.S. Supreme Court, picking the 49-year-old federal appeals court judge to restore the court's conservative majority and help shape rulings on divisive issues such as abortion, gun control, the death penalty and religious rights.

The Colorado native faces a potentially contentious confirmation battle in the U.S. Senate after Republicans last year refused to consider President Barack Obama's nominee to fill the vacancy caused by the death of conservative justice Antonin Scalia.

Gorsuch is the youngest nominee to the nation's highest court in more than a quarter century, and he could influence the direction of the court for decades.

Gorsuch is a judge on the Denver-based 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and was appointed to that post by Republican President George W. Bush in 2006.

Gorsuch is considered a conservative intellectual, known for backing religious rights, and is seen as very much in the mold of Scalia, a leading conservative voice on the court for decades.

Gorsuch joined an opinion in 2013 saying that owners of private companies could object on religious grounds to a provision of the Obamacare health insurance law requiring employers to provide coverage for birth control for women.

Gorsuch has strong academic qualifications, with an Ivy League education: attending Columbia University and, like several of the other justices on the court, Harvard Law School. He also completed a doctorate in legal philosophy at Oxford University, spent several years in private practice and worked in George W. Bush's Justice Department.

REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

President Donald Trump nominated Neil Gorsuch for a lifetime job on the U.S. Supreme Court, picking the 49-year-old federal appeals court judge to restore the court's conservative majority and help shape rulings on divisive issues such as abortion,...more

President Donald Trump nominated Neil Gorsuch for a lifetime job on the U.S. Supreme Court, picking the 49-year-old federal appeals court judge to restore the court's conservative majority and help shape rulings on divisive issues such as abortion, gun control, the death penalty and religious rights. The Colorado native faces a potentially contentious confirmation battle in the U.S. Senate after Republicans last year refused to consider President Barack Obama's nominee to fill the vacancy caused by the death of conservative justice Antonin Scalia. Gorsuch is the youngest nominee to the nation's highest court in more than a quarter century, and he could influence the direction of the court for decades. Gorsuch is a judge on the Denver-based 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and was appointed to that post by Republican President George W. Bush in 2006. Gorsuch is considered a conservative intellectual, known for backing religious rights, and is seen as very much in the mold of Scalia, a leading conservative voice on the court for decades. Gorsuch joined an opinion in 2013 saying that owners of private companies could object on religious grounds to a provision of the Obamacare health insurance law requiring employers to provide coverage for birth control for women. Gorsuch has strong academic qualifications, with an Ivy League education: attending Columbia University and, like several of the other justices on the court, Harvard Law School. He also completed a doctorate in legal philosophy at Oxford University, spent several years in private practice and worked in George W. Bush's Justice Department. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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13 / 27
White House senior advisor Steve Bannon - the populist firebrand fast emerging as the president's right-hand man - has taken a hard line in the first days of the Trump presidency.

When Homeland Security senior officials interpreted the travel ban executive order to mean that green card holders would not face additional screening, they were quickly overruled by Bannon and senior policy advisor Stephen Miller.

Bannon has also asserted authority over almost all written statements from the White House and the National Security Council and has sent back documents for rewrites as he sees fit, one NSC official said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

Trump gave him an unprecedented seat in the NSC's top-level meetings and potentially narrowed the role played by the director of national intelligence (DNI) and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Critics, including four senior U.S. intelligence officers, called the decision to formalize Bannon's role at the NSC meetings a mistake, saying it risks politicizing decisions on national security.

Critics have accused Bannon of harboring anti-Semitic and white nationalist sentiments. Under Bannon's leadership, his Breitbart website presented a number of conspiracy theories about Hillary Clinton, as well as Republicans deemed to be lacking in conservative bona fides.

Bannon has ascribed his interest in populism and American nationalism to a desire to curb what he views as the corrosive effects of globalization. He has rejected what he called the "ethno-nationalist" tendencies of some in the movement.

He has been an almost constant presence by Trump's side in the first 10 days of the administration - in the White House for a meeting with American manufacturers, at CIA headquarters the day after Trump was sworn in, and in the Oval Office during British Prime Minister Theresa May's visit.

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

White House senior advisor Steve Bannon - the populist firebrand fast emerging as the president's right-hand man - has taken a hard line in the first days of the Trump presidency. When Homeland Security senior officials interpreted the travel ban...more

White House senior advisor Steve Bannon - the populist firebrand fast emerging as the president's right-hand man - has taken a hard line in the first days of the Trump presidency. When Homeland Security senior officials interpreted the travel ban executive order to mean that green card holders would not face additional screening, they were quickly overruled by Bannon and senior policy advisor Stephen Miller. Bannon has also asserted authority over almost all written statements from the White House and the National Security Council and has sent back documents for rewrites as he sees fit, one NSC official said, speaking on condition of anonymity. Trump gave him an unprecedented seat in the NSC's top-level meetings and potentially narrowed the role played by the director of national intelligence (DNI) and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Critics, including four senior U.S. intelligence officers, called the decision to formalize Bannon's role at the NSC meetings a mistake, saying it risks politicizing decisions on national security. Critics have accused Bannon of harboring anti-Semitic and white nationalist sentiments. Under Bannon's leadership, his Breitbart website presented a number of conspiracy theories about Hillary Clinton, as well as Republicans deemed to be lacking in conservative bona fides. Bannon has ascribed his interest in populism and American nationalism to a desire to curb what he views as the corrosive effects of globalization. He has rejected what he called the "ethno-nationalist" tendencies of some in the movement. He has been an almost constant presence by Trump's side in the first 10 days of the administration - in the White House for a meeting with American manufacturers, at CIA headquarters the day after Trump was sworn in, and in the Oval Office during British Prime Minister Theresa May's visit. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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14 / 27
Jared Kushner, husband of Ivanka Trump and son-in-law to Donald Trump, is a senior White House advisor.

Trump said that he would appoint Kushner to broker a Middle East peace deal.

Questions about Kushner's role emerged as voters and lawmakers questioned potential conflicts of interest for Trump, given his wide-ranging business interests, history of employing family members, and the influence of his daughter Ivanka Trump, who is married to Kushner. But on January 20, the Department of Justice said Trump could hire Kushner without breaking federal anti-nepotism laws.

Kushner has said he would step down as CEO of Kushner Companies, a family owned real estate company, and begin to divest himself of substantial assets.

The 35-year-old emerged as an important voice early in Trump's campaign and was involved in almost every aspect of it, from key personnel decisions to strategy and fundraising.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Jared Kushner, husband of Ivanka Trump and son-in-law to Donald Trump, is a senior White House advisor. Trump said that he would appoint Kushner to broker a Middle East peace deal. Questions about Kushner's role emerged as voters and lawmakers...more

Jared Kushner, husband of Ivanka Trump and son-in-law to Donald Trump, is a senior White House advisor. Trump said that he would appoint Kushner to broker a Middle East peace deal. Questions about Kushner's role emerged as voters and lawmakers questioned potential conflicts of interest for Trump, given his wide-ranging business interests, history of employing family members, and the influence of his daughter Ivanka Trump, who is married to Kushner. But on January 20, the Department of Justice said Trump could hire Kushner without breaking federal anti-nepotism laws. Kushner has said he would step down as CEO of Kushner Companies, a family owned real estate company, and begin to divest himself of substantial assets. The 35-year-old emerged as an important voice early in Trump's campaign and was involved in almost every aspect of it, from key personnel decisions to strategy and fundraising. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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15 / 27
Trump's campaign manager Kellyanne Conway now holds the role of White House senior advisor.

Conway used the term "alternative facts" on NBC's "Meet the Press" on January 22 during a discussion about the size of the crowd at Trump's inauguration. Some commentators denounced her expression as "Orwellian." She was responding to accusations that the Trump administration was fixated on the size of his inauguration crowds, saying: "We feel compelled to go out and clear the air and put alternative facts out there."

Conway focused on a press pool report that said the bust of civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. had been removed from the Oval Office after Trump took office. The report was quickly corrected, but Trump called out the reporter by name during a visit to the Central Intelligence Agency on January 21. Press secretary Sean Spicer also berated the reporter later in the day.

Conway addressed the anti-abortion "March for Life" in Washington on January 27. "We hear you. We see you. We respect you," she said. "And we look forward to working with you."

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Trump's campaign manager Kellyanne Conway now holds the role of White House senior advisor. Conway used the term "alternative facts" on NBC's "Meet the Press" on January 22 during a discussion about the size of the crowd at Trump's inauguration....more

Trump's campaign manager Kellyanne Conway now holds the role of White House senior advisor. Conway used the term "alternative facts" on NBC's "Meet the Press" on January 22 during a discussion about the size of the crowd at Trump's inauguration. Some commentators denounced her expression as "Orwellian." She was responding to accusations that the Trump administration was fixated on the size of his inauguration crowds, saying: "We feel compelled to go out and clear the air and put alternative facts out there." Conway focused on a press pool report that said the bust of civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. had been removed from the Oval Office after Trump took office. The report was quickly corrected, but Trump called out the reporter by name during a visit to the Central Intelligence Agency on January 21. Press secretary Sean Spicer also berated the reporter later in the day. Conway addressed the anti-abortion "March for Life" in Washington on January 27. "We hear you. We see you. We respect you," she said. "And we look forward to working with you." REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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16 / 27
Retired four-star Marine Corps General James "Mad Dog" Mattis was sworn in as Secretary of Defense hours after Trump was sworn in on January 20.

Trump said that he would defer to Mattis regarding the use of waterboarding as an intelligence-gathering tool, even though Trump said he still believes the practice works.

Trump said Mattis does not "necessarily believe" in waterboarding and other enhanced interrogation techniques, which many lawmakers and other rights groups denounce as torture.

"I don't necessarily agree, but I would tell you that he will override because I'm giving him that power," Trump said of Mattis on January 27.

"I happen to feel that it does work. I've been open about that for a long period of time. But I am going with our leaders," Trump said.

His confirmation required waiving a law on civilian control of the U.S. military to allow him to lead the Pentagon only 3-1/2 years after retiring from the Marines, instead of the seven required by the statute, drawing concern from Democrats. The law had only been waived once before, in 1950, to allow George Marshall, the post-war Secretary of State, to serve as Secretary of Defense.

From 2010 to 2013, Mattis headed the U.S. military's Central Command, which oversees operations stretching from the Horn of Africa through the Middle East and into Central Asia including Afghanistan and Pakistan. During that time, he was at odds with the Obama administration on the need to prepare for potential threats from Iran and about resources for Afghanistan. Mattis, 66, served as an American commander in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and was known to be popular among the troops.

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Retired four-star Marine Corps General James "Mad Dog" Mattis was sworn in as Secretary of Defense hours after Trump was sworn in on January 20. Trump said that he would defer to Mattis regarding the use of waterboarding as an intelligence-gathering...more

Retired four-star Marine Corps General James "Mad Dog" Mattis was sworn in as Secretary of Defense hours after Trump was sworn in on January 20. Trump said that he would defer to Mattis regarding the use of waterboarding as an intelligence-gathering tool, even though Trump said he still believes the practice works. Trump said Mattis does not "necessarily believe" in waterboarding and other enhanced interrogation techniques, which many lawmakers and other rights groups denounce as torture. "I don't necessarily agree, but I would tell you that he will override because I'm giving him that power," Trump said of Mattis on January 27. "I happen to feel that it does work. I've been open about that for a long period of time. But I am going with our leaders," Trump said. His confirmation required waiving a law on civilian control of the U.S. military to allow him to lead the Pentagon only 3-1/2 years after retiring from the Marines, instead of the seven required by the statute, drawing concern from Democrats. The law had only been waived once before, in 1950, to allow George Marshall, the post-war Secretary of State, to serve as Secretary of Defense. From 2010 to 2013, Mattis headed the U.S. military's Central Command, which oversees operations stretching from the Horn of Africa through the Middle East and into Central Asia including Afghanistan and Pakistan. During that time, he was at odds with the Obama administration on the need to prepare for potential threats from Iran and about resources for Afghanistan. Mattis, 66, served as an American commander in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and was known to be popular among the troops. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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17 / 27
White House press secretary Sean Spicer promised reporters on January 23 that he would never lie after a weekend briefing in which he made statements about the crowd size for Trump's inauguration that were debunked.

In comments to reporters on January 21 that became known as the "alternative facts" briefing, Spicer declared that Trump's crowd was "the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration - period."

Photographs showed the crowds at Trump's swearing-in were smaller than Barack Obama's first presidential inauguration in 2009.

At his first formal White House briefing two days later, Spicer was asked by a reporter if he intended to always tell the truth from the lectern. "Our intention is never to lie to you," he replied. Spicer defended his right to give the administration's point of view.

He said he had been including television and online viewers in his remarks about the size of the inauguration crowd. He told reporters that Trump and his advisers had been frustrated by "demoralizing" coverage that he called a "constant attempt to undermine his credibility."

"I want to have a healthy relationship with the press," Spicer said.

Spicer also said he would start taking questions from four "Skype seats" to allow news organizations outside of Washington to participate.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

White House press secretary Sean Spicer promised reporters on January 23 that he would never lie after a weekend briefing in which he made statements about the crowd size for Trump's inauguration that were debunked. In comments to reporters on...more

White House press secretary Sean Spicer promised reporters on January 23 that he would never lie after a weekend briefing in which he made statements about the crowd size for Trump's inauguration that were debunked. In comments to reporters on January 21 that became known as the "alternative facts" briefing, Spicer declared that Trump's crowd was "the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration - period." Photographs showed the crowds at Trump's swearing-in were smaller than Barack Obama's first presidential inauguration in 2009. At his first formal White House briefing two days later, Spicer was asked by a reporter if he intended to always tell the truth from the lectern. "Our intention is never to lie to you," he replied. Spicer defended his right to give the administration's point of view. He said he had been including television and online viewers in his remarks about the size of the inauguration crowd. He told reporters that Trump and his advisers had been frustrated by "demoralizing" coverage that he called a "constant attempt to undermine his credibility." "I want to have a healthy relationship with the press," Spicer said. Spicer also said he would start taking questions from four "Skype seats" to allow news organizations outside of Washington to participate. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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18 / 27
Retired General John Kelly has been confirmed as Secretary of Homeland Security, a sprawling department responsible for everything from domestic antiterrorism to border security and disaster prevention.

Trump's executive order to ban entry of refugees and people from seven Muslim-majority nations was developed hastily and was not extensively reviewed by the agencies which are now grappling with implementing it.

Confusion mounted as U.S. Customs and Border Protection, a division of the Department of Homeland Security, rushed to brief airlines, customs agents and others involved in air travel about how to implement Trump's executive order, which was not explicit about how to handle green card holders and other previously admissible populations.

Kelly said in a statement that people from the seven countries who hold green cards would not be blocked from returning to the United States, as some had been after the directive.

A Department of Homeland Security official, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers had no advance notice of the order or how they should respond to it. Kelly said he did know the executive order was coming and "had people involved in the general drafting of it."

Several lawsuits have been filed blocking portions of the order, which drew harsh criticism from Democrats, human rights organizations and some Western U.S. allies.

REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Retired General John Kelly has been confirmed as Secretary of Homeland Security, a sprawling department responsible for everything from domestic antiterrorism to border security and disaster prevention. Trump's executive order to ban entry of...more

Retired General John Kelly has been confirmed as Secretary of Homeland Security, a sprawling department responsible for everything from domestic antiterrorism to border security and disaster prevention. Trump's executive order to ban entry of refugees and people from seven Muslim-majority nations was developed hastily and was not extensively reviewed by the agencies which are now grappling with implementing it. Confusion mounted as U.S. Customs and Border Protection, a division of the Department of Homeland Security, rushed to brief airlines, customs agents and others involved in air travel about how to implement Trump's executive order, which was not explicit about how to handle green card holders and other previously admissible populations. Kelly said in a statement that people from the seven countries who hold green cards would not be blocked from returning to the United States, as some had been after the directive. A Department of Homeland Security official, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers had no advance notice of the order or how they should respond to it. Kelly said he did know the executive order was coming and "had people involved in the general drafting of it." Several lawsuits have been filed blocking portions of the order, which drew harsh criticism from Democrats, human rights organizations and some Western U.S. allies. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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19 / 27
Nikki Haley was confirmed as ambassador to the United Nations, sending a rising Republican star to represent President Donald Trump at an institution he has criticized.

Haley sent another shiver through America's allies on January 27, warning them that if they do not have Washington's back, she is "taking names" and will respond.

During her confirmation hearing, the 45-year-old promised to press for U.N. reforms but also fight for human rights and support international institutions, often breaking from Trump's positions. Haley called for a close look at U.S. spending on the United Nations and blasted what she called its bias against Israel. Washington provides 22 percent of the U.N. budget.

The United States and its frequent rivals Russia and China all hold permanent seats on the U.N. Security Council, along with U.S. allies Britain and France. Haley won plaudits at her hearing for promising to stand up to Russia and agreeing that its actions, including bombing hospitals in Syria, should be considered war crimes.

The daughter of immigrants from India, Haley attracted national attention in 2015 when as South Carolina governor she secured the removal of the Confederate battle flag from South Carolina's capitol grounds after a white supremacist killed nine black churchgoers in Charleston.

She did not endorse Trump during last year's presidential primaries and has warned that some of his most inflammatory statements promoted hate.

REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Nikki Haley was confirmed as ambassador to the United Nations, sending a rising Republican star to represent President Donald Trump at an institution he has criticized. Haley sent another shiver through America's allies on January 27, warning them...more

Nikki Haley was confirmed as ambassador to the United Nations, sending a rising Republican star to represent President Donald Trump at an institution he has criticized. Haley sent another shiver through America's allies on January 27, warning them that if they do not have Washington's back, she is "taking names" and will respond. During her confirmation hearing, the 45-year-old promised to press for U.N. reforms but also fight for human rights and support international institutions, often breaking from Trump's positions. Haley called for a close look at U.S. spending on the United Nations and blasted what she called its bias against Israel. Washington provides 22 percent of the U.N. budget. The United States and its frequent rivals Russia and China all hold permanent seats on the U.N. Security Council, along with U.S. allies Britain and France. Haley won plaudits at her hearing for promising to stand up to Russia and agreeing that its actions, including bombing hospitals in Syria, should be considered war crimes. The daughter of immigrants from India, Haley attracted national attention in 2015 when as South Carolina governor she secured the removal of the Confederate battle flag from South Carolina's capitol grounds after a white supremacist killed nine black churchgoers in Charleston. She did not endorse Trump during last year's presidential primaries and has warned that some of his most inflammatory statements promoted hate. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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20 / 27
Mike Pompeo was confirmed as director of the Central Intelligence Agency. The CIA post is one of the most highly charged in Washington, amid controversy surrounding Russian attempts to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election in Trump's favor.

Trump belittled the agency as he questioned its conclusion that Russia was involved in cyber hacking that interfered with the election.

Trump is also considering bringing back a CIA program for holding terrorism suspects in secret overseas "black site" prisons where interrogation techniques often condemned as torture were used.

Trump will amend his recent National Security Council reorganization to add the CIA to the group, the White House says, following criticism of the restructuring, which included the addition of political adviser Steve Bannon.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Mike Pompeo was confirmed as director of the Central Intelligence Agency. The CIA post is one of the most highly charged in Washington, amid controversy surrounding Russian attempts to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election in Trump's...more

Mike Pompeo was confirmed as director of the Central Intelligence Agency. The CIA post is one of the most highly charged in Washington, amid controversy surrounding Russian attempts to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election in Trump's favor. Trump belittled the agency as he questioned its conclusion that Russia was involved in cyber hacking that interfered with the election. Trump is also considering bringing back a CIA program for holding terrorism suspects in secret overseas "black site" prisons where interrogation techniques often condemned as torture were used. Trump will amend his recent National Security Council reorganization to add the CIA to the group, the White House says, following criticism of the restructuring, which included the addition of political adviser Steve Bannon. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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21 / 27
Elaine Chao has been confirmed as secretary of the Transportation Department, the agency that oversees aviation, vehicle, train and pipeline safety.

Chao will face key decisions on how to regulate the growing use of drones and automakers' plans to offer self-driving cars.

She will be a key player in the Trump administration's plans to win approval for a $1 trillion infrastructure proposal over 10 years. The department has a $75 billion annual budget and around 60,000 employees and includes the Federal Aviation Administration, which handles air traffic control.

Chao, 63, was labor secretary under President George W. Bush for eight years and the first Asian-American woman to hold a Cabinet position. She also served as a deputy labor secretary under President George H.W. Bush. Chao is a director at Ingersoll Rand, News Corp and Vulcan Materials Company. She is married to U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican from Kentucky.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Elaine Chao has been confirmed as secretary of the Transportation Department, the agency that oversees aviation, vehicle, train and pipeline safety. Chao will face key decisions on how to regulate the growing use of drones and automakers' plans to...more

Elaine Chao has been confirmed as secretary of the Transportation Department, the agency that oversees aviation, vehicle, train and pipeline safety. Chao will face key decisions on how to regulate the growing use of drones and automakers' plans to offer self-driving cars. She will be a key player in the Trump administration's plans to win approval for a $1 trillion infrastructure proposal over 10 years. The department has a $75 billion annual budget and around 60,000 employees and includes the Federal Aviation Administration, which handles air traffic control. Chao, 63, was labor secretary under President George W. Bush for eight years and the first Asian-American woman to hold a Cabinet position. She also served as a deputy labor secretary under President George H.W. Bush. Chao is a director at Ingersoll Rand, News Corp and Vulcan Materials Company. She is married to U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican from Kentucky. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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22 / 27
White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus was formerly Republican National Committee chairman. The longtime Wisconsin political operative was credited with marshaling party resources for Trump's White House bid.

Priebus' moderate advice was being drowned out by the opinions of Steve Bannon and Stephen Miller, said a senior DHS official and two people in Washington who work closely with the White House on immigration and a range of other issues.

One of those people and the DHS official said Priebus felt he had placed enough of his fellow moderate Republicans in key positions at the White House as a counterbalance to Bannon and Miller, but he has been frustrated at their outsized influence so far, especially on issues of immigration and national security.

A day after the inauguration, Priebus intensified the Trump administration's criticism of the news media, accusing it of trying to delegitimize Trump's presidency and vowing to fight such coverage "tooth and nail."

"The media from Day One has been talking about delegitimizing the election," Priebus said in an interview with "Fox News Sunday." He accused the media of attacks on the new president, saying "we're not going to sit around and take it."

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus was formerly Republican National Committee chairman. The longtime Wisconsin political operative was credited with marshaling party resources for Trump's White House bid. Priebus' moderate advice was being...more

White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus was formerly Republican National Committee chairman. The longtime Wisconsin political operative was credited with marshaling party resources for Trump's White House bid. Priebus' moderate advice was being drowned out by the opinions of Steve Bannon and Stephen Miller, said a senior DHS official and two people in Washington who work closely with the White House on immigration and a range of other issues. One of those people and the DHS official said Priebus felt he had placed enough of his fellow moderate Republicans in key positions at the White House as a counterbalance to Bannon and Miller, but he has been frustrated at their outsized influence so far, especially on issues of immigration and national security. A day after the inauguration, Priebus intensified the Trump administration's criticism of the news media, accusing it of trying to delegitimize Trump's presidency and vowing to fight such coverage "tooth and nail." "The media from Day One has been talking about delegitimizing the election," Priebus said in an interview with "Fox News Sunday." He accused the media of attacks on the new president, saying "we're not going to sit around and take it." REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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23 / 27
Senior advisor Stephen Miller is a close ally of White House chief strategist Steve Bannon. A senior national security official described the pair as a "tag team" pushing Trump's key policies.

Miller is said to have mastered the thinking of his former boss and anti-immigration advocate Jeff Sessions, Trump's nominee for U.S. Attorney General, as well as Bannon. Miller is known to be a staunch advocate for restricting immigration, even by workers who enter legally on visas.

REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Senior advisor Stephen Miller is a close ally of White House chief strategist Steve Bannon. A senior national security official described the pair as a "tag team" pushing Trump's key policies. Miller is said to have mastered the thinking of his...more

Senior advisor Stephen Miller is a close ally of White House chief strategist Steve Bannon. A senior national security official described the pair as a "tag team" pushing Trump's key policies. Miller is said to have mastered the thinking of his former boss and anti-immigration advocate Jeff Sessions, Trump's nominee for U.S. Attorney General, as well as Bannon. Miller is known to be a staunch advocate for restricting immigration, even by workers who enter legally on visas. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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24 / 27
Hope Hicks, Trump's sole spokeswoman when he began what was considered a longshot candidacy in June 2015, is now White House director of strategic communications.

REUTERS/Carlo Allegr's

Hope Hicks, Trump's sole spokeswoman when he began what was considered a longshot candidacy in June 2015, is now White House director of strategic communications. REUTERS/Carlo Allegr's

Hope Hicks, Trump's sole spokeswoman when he began what was considered a longshot candidacy in June 2015, is now White House director of strategic communications. REUTERS/Carlo Allegr's
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25 / 27
Dan Scavino, campaign director of social media and senior advisor, is the White House director of social media.

REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Dan Scavino, campaign director of social media and senior advisor, is the White House director of social media. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Dan Scavino, campaign director of social media and senior advisor, is the White House director of social media. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
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26 / 27
Michael Flynn resigned as national security adviser on February 13 after revelations that he had discussed U.S. sanctions on Russia with the Russian ambassador to the United States before Trump took office and misled Vice President Mike Pence about the conversations.

Flynn's departure was a sobering development in Trump's young presidency. The departure could slow Trump's bid to warm up relations with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Flynn had promised Pence he had not discussed U.S. sanctions with the Russians, but transcripts of intercepted communications, described by U.S. officials, showed that the subject had come up in conversations between him and the Russian ambassador.

Such contacts could potentially be in violation of a law banning private citizens from engaging in foreign policy, known as the Logan Act.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Michael Flynn resigned as national security adviser on February 13 after revelations that he had discussed U.S. sanctions on Russia with the Russian ambassador to the United States before Trump took office and misled Vice President Mike Pence about...more

Michael Flynn resigned as national security adviser on February 13 after revelations that he had discussed U.S. sanctions on Russia with the Russian ambassador to the United States before Trump took office and misled Vice President Mike Pence about the conversations. Flynn's departure was a sobering development in Trump's young presidency. The departure could slow Trump's bid to warm up relations with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Flynn had promised Pence he had not discussed U.S. sanctions with the Russians, but transcripts of intercepted communications, described by U.S. officials, showed that the subject had come up in conversations between him and the Russian ambassador. Such contacts could potentially be in violation of a law banning private citizens from engaging in foreign policy, known as the Logan Act. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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27 / 27

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