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U.S. aid to Pakistan questioned by lawmakers

Friday, May 06, 2011 - 01:45

May 5 - Many U.S. officials are openly questioning the value of maintaining strong ties with Pakistan -- the country used as a hideout for al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden. Jon Decker reports.

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In the wake of the killing of Osama bin Laden at his Pakistani compound, many U.S. officials are openly questioning the value of maintaining strong ties with Pakistan -- the country used as a hideout for the al Qaeda leader. In a hearing before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Senator Chris Coons, a Democrat from Delaware, expressed doubts about whether the U.S. should continue to provide billions of dollars in foreign aid to the Pakistani government. SOUNDBITE: U.S. Senator Chris Coons saying (English): "At best, the ISI was unable to detect bin Laden's presence, at worst was complicit in providing him safe haven, probably for six years and in either way, it then challenges us to recalibrate our relationship." Most troubling to lawmakers is the revelation that bin Laden lived in his compound for years -- unperturbed by Pakistani security officials. Republican Senator Bob Corker. SOUNDBITE: U.S. Senator Bob Corker saying (English): "I think this is a great opportunity. As has been said, either they're in cahoots or incompetent. But this gives us an opportunity to now sort of re-arrange that relationship." Pakistan's Ambassador to the U.S. has said the ISI -Pakistan's Security Service-- dropped the ball in getting bin Laden. Before the raid, the Obama Administration had asked for $1.8 billion in new aid for Pakistan despite concerns about widespread corruption in the Pakistani government. Jon Decker, Reuters.

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U.S. aid to Pakistan questioned by lawmakers

Friday, May 06, 2011 - 01:45