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Ukranian's vote pro-west

Monday, October 27, 2014 - 02:08

Pro-Western parties will dominate Ukraine's parliament after an election handed President Petro Poroshenko a mandate to end a separatist conflict and steer the country further out of Russia's orbit. Melanie Ralph looks at the impact of the election on the crisis.

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Ukraine has taken another step closer to Europe. Coalition talks are needed but early election results show pro-western President Petro Poroshenko, and the party of his ally, Prime Minister Arseny Yatseniuk, have each taken over 21 percent of the votes. The Communist Party didn't even make it into parliament for the first time. Many Kiev residents are delighted. (SOUNDBITE) (Ukrainian) KIEV RESIDENT, OLEKSANDR KUTSENKO, 60, SAYING: "I believe in his direction, in his achievements. He does everything for people. That's why I really appreciate it. And I believe that everything will be good in our country." Poroshenko's victory is just the start of a long battle. BGC's Mike Ingram says the new government has a lot to prove to neighbouring Russia to convince markets the crisis is turning a corner: SOUNDBITE: MIKE INGRAM, STRATEGIST, BGC, SAYING (English): "It's clearly a positive move that there seems to be a workable majority in the Ukrainian parliament going forward. Of course the 64 thousand dollar question is, is this an administration with whom Putin sees as credible, as legitimate, and is willing to talk business with? I'm not entirely sure it's going to be the case." Russia continues to resist moves by Kiev to one day join the European Union. And Russia's President Vladimir Putin can still influence events - Moscow is the main backer of the rebels in the east and also supplies Ukraine and the EU with vital natural gas. Mending Ukraine's fractured economy will be top of the agenda for the new coalition. The government says it's hoping for modest economic growth next year after a 6 percent decline in 2014. The World Bank isn't quite so confident - predicting another fall. But Russia hasn't come out unscathed either. SOUNDBITE: MIKE INGRAM, STRATEGIST, BGC, SAYING (English): "I think that most people are now forecasting Russia to be in a recession by the end of this year so, the economic fundamentals are deteriorating quite rapidly." A ceasefire is barely holding in the east where Ukrainian government forces have been fighting pro-Russian separatists. Political uncertainty here remains. Separatists entrenched in the big eastern cities of Donetsk and Luhansk say they're planning a rival vote on Nov. 2nd to further their calls for independence.

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Ukranian's vote pro-west

Monday, October 27, 2014 - 02:08