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Israeli firm makes sense of sensing

Sunday, November 09, 2014 - 01:52

It just might become your 'sixth sense'. An Israeli company has developed a mobile sensor that can scan and analyse objects on a molecular level. Its developers say the device will pave the way to a more intelligent consumer experience. Sharon Reich reports.

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Imagine being able to immediately identify the potential health risks or benefits in a product you're about to buy. It may soon be possible with this...it's called Scio and it can scan any object, break it down to its molecular parts and list every ingredient it contains in a matter of seconds. Scio is the brainchild of Dror Sharon, the CEO of Israeli based tech company Consumer physics. (SOUNDBITE) (English) DROR SHARON, CONSUMER PHYSICS CEO AND CO-FOUNDER, SAYING: "You can imagine going, travelling to a third world country, you are going and you have a headache, you didn't bring your Advil, you go to the pharmacy and you ask 'can I get an Advil please?', so they'll give you a pill but you have no idea what it says, you have no idea what's written on the package, you can sense it immediately. If you for example go every week to a farmers market, you just like to go to a farmers market and they tell you 'this kind of cheese it's very low fat', you measure it on the spot and you know exactly what you're getting." According to Sharon, the device uses an optical scanner to record the molecular signature of an object by taking advantage of the relationship between light and matter. (SOUNDBITE) (English) DROR SHARON, CONSUMER PHYSICS CEO AND CO-FOUNDER, SAYING: "Scio uses spectroscopy - the science of light matter interaction. That interaction creates a finger print. That finger print is sent to our cloud for analysis." That cloud hosts a giant database of molecular matter. Once analysed the results are sent to a smartphone. In addition to food and agriculture products, Scio has the potential to be applied to industries as diverse as pharmaceuticals, oil and gas and even cosmetics. The Cloud based technology is expected to roll out next March and will cost $250 (USD) per unit. Looking forward, Sharon says his company is already working on miniaturizing the sensor so it can fit in a smartphone or a wearable device.

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Israeli firm makes sense of sensing

Sunday, November 09, 2014 - 01:52