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Violence marks three-month anniversary of feared Mexican student massacre

Friday, December 26, 2014 - 00:28

Angry protesters attack a local army base in Mexico's restive city of Iguala on the three-month anniversary of the disappearance of 43 missing students. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

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ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) Protesters attacked a local army base in Iguala, Mexico, on Friday (December 26) on the three-month anniversary of the disappearance of 43 student teachers in the small Mexican city to express outrage over the feared massacre and the lack of answers. Angry protesters forced open the steel gates at the army base before authorities released gas canisters to dispel the crowd. Iguala is located in the southwestern Mexican state of Guerrero, which has seen bursts of violence since the Sept. 26 disappearances including the burning of the state legislature building. With many holding out belief that the students are still alive, the demonstrators are calling on the government to return the missing. "It's been three months, three months without being able to sleep, eat, rest. My mother's exhausted. I ask the government to have some shame, hand them back," said Guadalupe Sanchez, a sister for one of the missing students. Three months after the students disappeared and with tensions still high, investigators are still scouring swathes of the restive state of Guerrero in search of the missing. More than 15 mass graves have been uncovered so far, but only one missing student has been identified amongst the remains. Although protests over the missing students have quieted down in recent weeks, activists have warned authorities they will not go away. "There definitely won't be any holidays for the movement. The movement is will continue active and alert, and it continues to grow," said activist, Walter Ayala. Public protests over the crime, which the government has blamed on corrupt police in league with a drug gang and city officials, have overshadowed Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto's efforts to tackle violence and turn over a new leaf after years of sub-par economic growth.

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Violence marks three-month anniversary of feared Mexican student massacre

Friday, December 26, 2014 - 00:28