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Transfer system faces biggest threat since Bosman - FIFPro

Friday, September 18, 2015 - 00:44

Soccer players' union FIFPro launches a complaint at the European Commission against FIFA's present transfer system.

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SHOWS: BRUSSELS, BELGIUM (SEPTEMBER 18, 2015) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FIFPRO GENERAL SECRETARY, THEO VAN SEGGELEN, SAYING: "FIFPro has asked the European Commission to explore the critical argument that the transfer regulations prevent clubs from fairly competing on the market, to acquire sporting talent, harming the interest of players, small and medium-size professional teams and their supporters." 2. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FIFPRO GENERAL SECRETARY, THEO VAN SEGGELEN, SAYING: "The transfer system fills and sustains increasing, competitive and financial imbalance. It invites commercial abuse by third parties, owners and agents and it fails to protect players against abuses of their labour contracts via systematic non-payment." STORY: The world players' union FIFPro said it had launched the biggest challenge to the transfer system since the 1995 Bosman ruling after it lodged a complaint at the European Commission on Friday (September 18). In a legal action directed against soccer's governing body FIFA, the union claimed that the current transfer system was anti-competitive, unjustified and illegal. FIFPro president Philippe Piat said the transfer system, in which players are traded among clubs for fees ranging from a few thousand to tens of millions of euros, represents "the interests of cartels." "FIFPro has asked the European Commission to explore the critical argument that the transfer regulations prevent clubs from fairly competing on the market, to acquire sporting talent, harming the interest of players, small and medium-size professional teams and their supporters," said Van Seggelen. "The transfer system fills and sustains increasing, competitive and financial imbalance. It invites commercial abuse by third parties, owners and agents and it fails to protect players against abuses of their labour contracts via systematic non-payment," he added. The case involving former player Jean-Marc Bosman paved the way for players in the European Union to move to other clubs at the end of a contract without a transfer fee being paid. It had a major impact internationally. The current transfer rules, which are governed by FIFA's Rules on the Status and Transfer of Players (RSTP), have been in force since 2001 after they were accepted by the European Commission.

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Transfer system faces biggest threat since Bosman - FIFPro

Friday, September 18, 2015 - 00:44