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Admiral says global effort exists to prevent ISIS from moving to other places

Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - 00:53

Adm. Kurt Tidd, Commander of U.S. Southern Command, says global defense chiefs are looking at steps ''in advance'' to make sure Islamic State doesn't ''squeeze out'' of Mosul and ''go to other places.'' Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

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ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) STORY: Adm. Kurt Tidd, commander, U.S. Southern Command spoke during a Pentagon press briefing on Tuesday (October 18) about Joint Task Force-Matthew relief efforts, and also responded to a reporter's question about the Mosul operation. "...General Dunford had a conference yesterday that he hosted for over 40 chiefs of defense from all around the world. And specifically to look at the global possibility of what happens after Mosul, what happens after the physical caliphate is reduced, and for us to all be thinking about what are the steps we should be taking in advance to make sure that we don't- that they don't squeeze out of there and go to other places," said Tidd. Residents of Mosul said Islamic State was using civilians as human shields as Iraqi and Kurdish forces captured outlying villages in their advance on the jihadists' stronghold. The leader of Islamic State was reported to be among thousands of hardline militants still in the city, suggesting the group would go to great lengths to repel the coalition. With attacking forces still between 20 and 50 km (12-30 miles) away, residents reached by telephone said more than 100 families had started moving from southern and eastern suburbs most exposed to the offensive to more central parts of the city. Islamic State militants were preventing people fleeing Mosul, they said, and one said they directed some towards buildings they had recently used themselves. "It's quite clear Daesh (Islamic State) has started to use civilians as human shields by allowing families to stay in buildings likely to be targeted by air strikes," said Abu Mahir, who lives near the city's university. Like other residents contacted in the city, he refused to give his full name, but Abdul Rahman Waggaa, a member of the exiled Provincial Council of Nineveh of which Mosul is the capital, corroborated his account to Reuters. The fall of Mosul would signal the defeat of the ultra-hardline Sunni jihadists in Iraq but could also lead to land grabs and sectarian bloodletting between groups which fought one another after the 2003 overthrow of Saddam Hussein.

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Admiral says global effort exists to prevent ISIS from moving to other places

Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - 00:53