Reuters - Video

Edition: US | UK | IN | CN | JP

video Video

WADA president looks to build bridges with Russian sport

Sunday, November 20, 2016 - 01:27

Anti-Doping Agency president Reedie welcomes appointment of new Russian anti-doping chief

▲ Hide Transcript

View Transcript

SHOWS: GLASGOW, SCOTLAND, UK (NOVEMBER 20, 2016)(REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 1. (SOUNDBITE)(English) CRAIG REEDIE, PRESIDENT OF WADA, SAYS: "My guess is that Vitaly would be saying this is not a permanent feature of life in my country. I think the facts are the McLaren investigation indicates that there had been breaches of the code involving the Moscow laboratory and the ministry of sport and to that extent that's the scale of the exercise that we understand and we have to deal with. I am really, really keen after two very, very long and unpleasant years to put that experience behind us and to move forward. We do need to have Russia compliant and then we need to get on with all the other things that will prove this agency." 2. VIEW OF NEWS CONFERENCE 3. (SOUNDBITE)(English) CRAIG REEDIE, PRESIDENT OF WADA, SAYS: "I think the establishment by President Putin of an independent commission run by a highly respected Olympic figure is a very good thing. I have known Vitaly Smirnov for many many years and his report today seemed to me to flow on very naturally from what WADA said. And I think we are making progress, and I wish him every success, and I would like to do this as quickly as we possibly coud and to that extent I am in his hands." STORY: President of WADA Craig Reedie spoke to ease relations after Russia's new anti-doping chief Vitaly Smirnov told the World Anti-Doping Agency on Sunday (November 20) that the country had "never had a state-sponsored system of doping". Smirnov, a senior figure in Soviet and Russian sport as an International Olympic Committee (IOC) member from 1971 to 2015, told a WADA Foundation meeting of delegates from governments and the Olympic world, that the abuse of performance-enhancing drugs was a global problem. At a question and answer session Reedie said he thought Smirnov was saying there had been breaches of the anti-doping code between a Moscow laboratory and the Russian Ministry of Sport. Reedie added that after two years he was keen to move on from the topic. "My guess is that Vitaly would be saying this is not a permanent feature of life in my country," Reedie told reporters at the end of the meeting in Glasgow. "I think the facts are the McLaren investigation indicates that there had been breaches of the code involving the Moscow laboratory and the ministry of sport and to that extent that's the scale of the exercise that we understand and we have to deal with. I am really, really keen after two very, very long and unpleasant years to put that experience behind us and to move forward. We do need to have Russia compliant and then we need to get on with all the other things that will prove this agency." WADA recommended that the entire Russian team be excluded from the Rio Olympics in August after accusing Russia of a systemic state-sponsored doping programme in its independent report by Richard McLaren, published just before the Games. Although Russian track and field athletes were banned from Rio, the IOC rejected the proposal of a blanket ban and instead let international sports federations decide which athletes should be eligible to compete. WADA Director General Olivier Niggli told the meeting that a second report from Canadian lawyer McLaren was set to be published on Dec 9. It is expected to provide more detail on the alleged Russian cheating and focus more on winter sports. Yet Reedie was keen to welcome Smirnov's involvement and to move on.

Press CTRL+C (Windows), CMD+C (Mac), or long-press the URL below on your mobile device to copy the code

WADA president looks to build bridges with Russian sport

Sunday, November 20, 2016 - 01:27