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Cameroonian girls turn waste into watts

Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 02:07

Cameroon based non-governmental organization Green Girls Project trains young girls and provides solutions to turn waste into biogas, to provide cheap renewable energy in areas where electricity is out of reach. Elly Park reports.

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Once the source of an unpleasant waste problem, these chickens are now part of a powerful nest egg for the people of Cameroon. Their droppings, combined with other organic waste material, are fermented and turned into this.....biogas desperately needed by those living without electricity. Educating students how to create this bio-fuel is Monique Ntumngia's mission. She realised there was a critical shortage of evening light while teaching girls about gender rights. SOUNDBITE (English) CEO AND FOUNDER OF THE GREEN GIRLS PROJECT, MONIQUE NTUMNGIA SAYING: "We were sharing didactic materials, empowering girls in this community in Kano on how to go to school and the benefits of education and one of the girls approaches me and asked me, 'Madam, we don't have light so how do we use all these books and all these educational tools you are given us'. And then it hit me that there was a real need for light." Ntumngia went on to found the Green Girls Project that provides technology classes for local girls. Equipment to convert waste into biogas is also provided. SOUNDBITE (French) CEO AND FOUNDER OF THE GREEN GIRLS PROJECT, MONIQUE NTUMNGIA SAYING: "When you are going to communities and you have to empower girls who didn't go to school, it is a different environment, it is a different scenario. Adapting this information to people who are not exposed to actually what is happening out of their immediate environment." Student Erica Lobe says the technology will help her family. SOUNDBITE (English) STUDENT, ERICA LOBE, SAYING: "We can get pawpaw peelings, banana peelings and make our gases and due to that, we will be able to produce our own energy to cook and to have like electricity in our homes." A 12 kilogram cylinder of gas costs 6,000 Central African francs - nearly 10 US dollars - a financial burden for the country's poorest. By converting waste into watts, these girls hope they can spend that money instead on other essentials, such as food and school supplies.

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Cameroonian girls turn waste into watts

Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 02:07