October 30, 2018 / 2:18 PM / 15 days ago

Ocean Shock: Lobster's great migration sets up boom and bust

STONINGTON, Maine (Reuters) - A lobster tattoo covers Drew Eaton’s left forearm, its pincers snapping at dock lines connecting it to the American flag on his upper arm. The tattoo is about three-quarters done, but the 27-year-old is too busy with his new boat to finish it.

Eaton knows what people here in Stonington have been saying about how much the boat cost him.

“I’ve heard rumours all over town, small town, everyone talks,” he says. “I’ve heard a million, two million.”

By the time he was in the third grade, Eaton was already lobstering here on Deer Isle in Downeast Maine. By the time he was in the eighth grade, he’d bought his first boat, a 20-footer, from a family friend. The latest one, a 46-footer built over the winter at a nearby boatyard, is his fourth.

Standing on the seawall after hauling lobster traps for about 12 hours on a foggy day this August, he says he’s making plenty of money to cover the boat loan. He’s unloaded 17 crates, each carrying 90 pounds of lobster, for a total haul of nearly $5,500. It’s a pretty typical day for him.

Eaton belongs to a new generation of Maine lobstermen who are riding high, for now, on a sweet spot of climate change. Two generations ago, the entire New England coast had a thriving lobster industry. Today, lobster catches have collapsed in southern New England, and the only state with a significant harvest is north in Maine, where the seafood practically synonymous with the state has exploded.

The thriving crustaceans have created a kind of nautical gold rush, with some young lobstermen making well into six figures a year. But it’s a boom with a bust already written in its wake, and the lobstermen of the younger generation may well pay the highest price. Not only have they heavily mortgaged themselves with pricey custom boats in the rush for quick profits, they’ll also bear the brunt of climate change – not to mention the possible collapse of the lobstering industry in Maine as the creatures flourish ever northward.

In the U.S. North Atlantic, fisheries data show that at least 85 percent of the nearly 70 federally tracked species have shifted north or deeper, or both, in recent years when compared to the norm over the past half-century. And the most dramatic of species shifts have occurred in the last 10 or 15 years.

Just in the last decade, for example, black sea bass have migrated up the East Coast into southern New England and are caught in the same traps that once caught lobsters. Back in the 1980s and 1990s, only 50 percent of lobster caught in the United States came from Maine. That started to shift in the 2000s, and this decade, nearly 85 percent of all lobster landings are in Maine.

Pushed out of their traditional habitats by dramatically rising ocean temperatures and other fallout from climate change, the lobsters are part of a global dislocation of marine species that threatens livelihoods and cultures in the lands where they once thrived.

On this island where two-lane roads twist around cedar-shingled houses and the rocky shore, lobstermen set the rhythm, often rising hours before dawn and resting not long after sunset.

Although young guns like Eaton are flush with cash now, old-timers know that lobsters no longer thrive in warming waters to the south, and they’ve heard the talk about how fast the Gulf of Maine is warming. They fret that lobsters will start failing here too and Stonington will lose its mantle as lobster capital of the world to somewhere in Canada. And these days, there’s not much to fall back on if it does.

They remember back when fishermen could catch plenty of cod, pollock and halibut if lobsters weren’t filling their traps. Until recently, shrimp was a reasonably reliable catch for local fishermen. But in 2014, regulators closed the shrimp fishery entirely.

“Here you’ve got these coastal fishing communities that are totally based on what comes out of the water,” says Ted Ames, a commercial fisherman who became a scientist and co-founded the Maine Center for Coastal Fisheries.

He sits in the research centre’s main conference room overlooking Stonington harbour, where hundreds of lobster boats bob on their mooring balls and the docks bustle with fishermen and their traps.

In coastal Maine, he says, there’s little to sustain a community other than lobster and tourism.

“You eliminate lobsters, and you have an instant Appalachia, right here.”

LOBSTERING THROUGH THE GENERATIONS

Unlike kids in most fishing communities around the world, youngsters here in Stonington clamour to get on the water. The gold-rush fever has gotten so bad, the local high school even has a programme that encourages students to graduate before heading off to make a living from fishing.

The skippers programme, as it is known, offers the allotment of traps as a reward for staying in school. And when the students graduate, it streamlines the process of getting a full Maine skipper licence, gradually increasing the number of traps to the maximum of 800.

Deer Isle-Stonington High life sciences teacher Seth Laplant sympathises with the students who chafe at being in school.

“We have students that, you know, run their own business during the summer and do very well, and then they come back here and they have to ask to go to the bathroom,” he says. “It’s like a completely different world for them and some of them do struggle with that. They’re used to being their own boss, and they’re respected in the community and in their families as adults.”

But like many teens, they still play the one-upmanship game. Only with these students, it revolves around the size of their boats or the number of traps they own.

Colby Schneider tells the class he’s the part-owner of a 30-foot fishing boat.

Alex Boyce can’t believe it. “Are you serious, you have a 30-foot Novi?”

“Yes,” Colby shoots back. “Me, my brother and my mom went thirds on it.”

Alex rolls his eyes. He’s still accumulating traps and owns about a third of the 150 traps that students in the programme are permitted to use. And his boat is only 19 feet long.

Later in the day, Alex gathers with his father and grandfather in his grandparents’ kitchen.

“Every year he asks: ‘Do I have to go back to school? Can I go fishing?’” says his father, offshore lobsterman Theodore Boyce II. “He went one weekend and made $700 in two days. That’s a tough thing to say no to as a parent … But if he doesn’t finish school, he doesn’t go fishing.”

Alex interrupts his father: “I was going to say, you seem to have a pretty easy job saying no.” Theodore’s eyes dart towards his son, and Alex backs down.

Alex’s grandfather, Theodore “Ted” Boyce, is a fisherman and retired teacher. The 69-year-old, who still fishes part time, hopes his grandson can make a decent living on the water, but he isn’t sure.

In the summer of 2017, chatter on the Stonington docks was that lobstering wasn’t going to be as lucrative as it had been in recent years. Lobstermen were pulling fewer lobsters, and the traps often came up coated with layers of slimy sea squirts – an invasive jellyfish-type creature.

The arrival of the squirts may or may not be related to climate change or the size of the catch, but it seemed to be a harbinger. As autumn moved towards winter, many of the traps piled high near the docks were encrusted with squirt carcasses.

And when the Maine fisheries released their 2017 landings numbers, the chatter on the docks turned out to be true: Maine lobstermen landed 15 percent less than the record haul in 2016, the lowest catch since the beginning of the decade.

THE LOBSTER RUSH

The waters between the islands of Deer Isle, Isle au Haut and Vinalhaven tell the story of the lobster rush.

Thousands upon thousands of colourfully painted buoys decorate the surface, marking the point where traps are strung below. Each fisherman has a colour pattern: reds and whites, blacks and pinks, and yellows, oranges and greens. Most are striped horizontally, making them easier to identify when floating on their sides.

Despite Maine’s reputation as a largely undeveloped state, it’s a thoroughly urban world under the water here. At the height of the summer, there are probably traps every 10 to 20 feet in the near-shore waters.

To describe a lobster pot as a trap, though, is a bit insulting to most other traps. As a practical matter, this is free-range aquaculture. The traps are designed to allow smaller, younger lobsters to come and go as they please, feasting on rotten fish. Even larger lobsters come and go, although with a little more effort.

Lindsay Copeland Frazier holds lobsters caught on her father's boat Jericho's Way at Greenhead Lobster in Stonington, Maine, U.S., July 5, 2017. Picture taken July 5, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

The unlucky ones are snacking when the trap’s owner decides to check it.

Lobster buoys like the ones off Stonington once punctuated waters along the entire New England coast. Between 1960 and 2000, Connecticut and Rhode Island in southern New England accounted for about 15 percent of the lobster harvest. Since 2010, however, lobster catches have collapsed in both states, with a combined haul of less than 2 percent.

Even Massachusetts Bay, which sits on the southwestern edge of the Gulf of Maine, has seen the catch dip dramatically. In the 1980s and 1990s, when lobster’s popularity with U.S. diners exploded, Massachusetts boats accounted for 20 to 30 percent of the harvest. Today, their share hovers around 10 percent.

Southern New England lobsters once were protected from the warm water temperatures in Long Island Sound by upwelling from the Labrador current that tucked in along the coast of eastern Connecticut, Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts.

As the waters in the sound became warmer and warmer during the summer months, the cooling current couldn’t keep up, and cold-water species such as lobsters no longer thrived in southern New England. And what remained of the lobster stock was vulnerable to an unsightly shell disease that made them worthless at the market.

But even as the lobster business boomed in Maine, the waters here were warming faster than almost any other body of water in the world.

Since 1980, the waters in the Gulf of Maine have steadily heated up, but that warming accelerated in the last decade. In fact, the average sea-surface temperature has been between 1 and 4 degrees Fahrenheit above the norm for most of the 2010s.

The warming is driven by direct and indirect effects of climate change, says Andrew Pershing, chief science officer of the Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

He says oceans the world over are absorbing heat from the warming atmosphere. The gulf’s warming, however, is compounded by its position in the North Atlantic, which is close to the weakening Labrador current flowing from the north and a strengthening warm Gulf Stream current flowing from the south.

“You know,” says Ames, the lobsterman turned scientist, “lobster is the best example of global warming we have.”

‘YOUNG GUYS, GO-GETTERS’

Perley Frazier has been working these waters for more than 50 years. And at 70 he still hauls the maximum permitted 800 traps.

His buoys, black on top, white in the middle and red on the bottom, are usually found a mile or so from town, near islands that once were quarried for granite by Italian immigrants. The stone was used in the construction of the George Washington Bridge in New York and the John F. Kennedy memorial at Arlington National Cemetery.

No one works in the quarries anymore, he says as he slows his boat, Jericho’s Way.

The rising sun winks off the peaks of swells and the thousands of buoys ahead of him. Without checking his chart plotter, he picks out a string of his buoys from about 100 yards away.

Behind Frazier, his daughter, Lindsay Frazier Copeland, and son-in-law, Brad Copeland, prepare to hook a buoy and haul up traps. After a haul of three keepers, Lindsay and Brad shove the traps back into the water. Frazier throttles up and spins the boat a few feet to the next buoy. It’s a well-practiced routine, and not much said is among the crew, called sternmen.

“It’s hard work, this,” Frazier says during one of their smoke breaks. “It’s hard to find a good sternman who wants to work this hard.” Since this trip, in fact, Brad and Lindsay have moved to Florida, and Frazier has put his boat up for sale.

On the way to the docks to unload his harvest, Frazier points to a trawler heading into port. It’s one of the few non-lobster boats in the town – a herring trawler that goes offshore to catch the small fish, which are used almost exclusively for bait.

And they can’t land enough herring to satisfy the local need for lobster bait; it’s trucked in from New Jersey, among other places. There are even stories of frozen fish heads from Asia finding their way into Maine lobster traps.

These days, Frazier is using cow hide and discarded fish carcasses as bait. Others are using menhaden, or pogies, which migrated north into these waters even as the herring population has dropped off.

The truth is, apart from lobster, there’s not much to catch here. And certainly not in the numbers that fishermen could make a living on.

Until this century, only about 50 percent of all fishing revenue in Maine came from lobstering, according to U.S. fisheries data. In the 2000s, that started to steadily rise until, in 2016, it topped 82 percent.

Later, Frazier sits in his armchair at home, after saving the largest five lobsters he caught for dinner. He sips a Canadian whiskey and recalls the days when there were other ways to make a living on the water besides lobster.

Take shrimp, for instance. “They always said shrimp needs cold water. Well, we haven’t had any cold water,” Frazier says.

“That’s the biggest thing – my biggest worry is about global warming. I mean, I’ve seen different fish that’s supposed to be down south that’s up here already, right now.

“We got like triggerfish and we’re gettin’ butterfish, and fella told me the other day ... that he had a seahorse.”

He looks at all the new boats being added to the local fishing fleet and isn’t sure lobster can sustain them.

“These guys, they got three-quarters of a million just in the boat,” he says. “And the gear another quarter-million dollars. They are a million.”

Maine’s fishing fleet is the newest in the nation among states with more than 200 U.S. Coast Guard-documented commercial fishing vessels. And it’s not close. Maine’s boats are an average 24 years old. The average age of the next two states, Massachusetts and Louisiana, is 31. Alaskan boats’ average age is 37, Oregon, 45.

Still, Frazier doesn’t begrudge the money that younger skippers on newer boats are making.

“I mean, these guys work hard and they go hard and put a lot of time in,” Frazier says. “Young guys, go-getters. And they did it right at the exact right time.”

SIX-FIGURE INCOME

Back when Drew Eaton was in grade school, it took him two years to buy that first boat, which a family friend’s daughter no longer used.

“I could buy half the boat and the motor the same year,” he says. He worked for the lobsterman the next summer to pay off the balance.

Eaton left Stonington after graduating from high school and went to Pennsylvania for a year to study automotive collision repair. He didn’t stay in that field for long.” I worked in a body shop for a year, and I was getting $12 an hour,” he says.

So he returned to what he knew.

The young lobsterman’s boat now easily produces a six-figure income before expenses. He doesn’t linger on doubts about the future of lobstering in Maine. He leaves that for others.

When he bought his last boat, he says, his parents were skeptical. “They thought I was going too quick.”

Eaton was 22 and it was the same type of boat his father had just bought.

Slideshow (23 Images)

“And then I started catching more than Dad. And then I wasn’t moving so quick.”

And besides, he says, “I am young enough that if I fail, I can start over again in something totally different.”

Reporting by Maurice Tamman; edited by Kari Howard

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