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United Kingdom

Swaha Pattanaik

Breakingviews - Germany would kill a few birds with one green bond

15 Aug 2019

LONDON (Reuters Breakingviews) - Germany could kill several birds by issuing one green bond. Raising money solely to manage a shift away from fossil fuels would underscore Berlin’s focus on making the transition. It would also give eco-friendly finance a crucial political boost. And it makes economic sense.

Breakingviews - German weakness gives ECB carte blanche to be bold

14 Aug 2019

LONDON (Reuters Breakingviews) - European Central Bank President Mario Draghi has just been given a free pass to be bold. It comes from Germany’s statistics office, which said on Wednesday that Europe’s largest economy contracted in the second quarter. The development will lessen any Teutonic resistance to the monetary easing that Draghi is planning.

Breakingviews - Markets want to see colour of Mario Draghi’s money

25 Jul 2019

LONDON (Reuters Breakingviews) - European Central Bank President Mario Draghi has made many promises, and lived up to them. Yet this time, financial markets want to see the colour of his money upfront.

Breakingviews - “Do or die” Brexit condemns sterling to new lows

16 Jul 2019

LONDON (Reuters Breakingviews) - Sterling is a collateral victim of the race to be Britain’s next prime minister. The frontrunner, Boris Johnson, has promised Britain will be out of the European Union by the end of October, “do or die”. What’s more, he and his rival, Jeremy Hunt, are vying with each other to take a harder stance on Brexit. Whatever good that does either man’s chances, it’s inflicting considerable damage on the pound. More pain probably lies ahead.

Breakingviews - New breed of central bankers is harder to read

11 Jul 2019

LONDON (Reuters Breakingviews) - A new breed of central bankers is emerging. They speak plainly and are less steeped in economic theories than recent predecessors. That has benefits but also means it is harder to predict how they will react.

Breakingviews - Lagarde lends ECB continuity more than credibility

02 Jul 2019

LONDON (Reuters Breakingviews) - The winner of the European Union’s jobs jackpot will matter less during the next economic downturn than the one who got the consolation prize. After much unedifying horse-trading about who would head the European Commission, the bloc’s leaders on Tuesday agreed a package deal that included naming International Monetary Fund boss Christine Lagarde to replace Mario Draghi as European Central Bank president. The Frenchwoman brings more continuity than credibility to an institution that rescued the euro from an existential crisis.

Breakingviews - UK is getting right fiscal policy for wrong reason

01 Jul 2019

LONDON (Reuters Breakingviews) - Britain looks like it will finally get the right fiscal policy, though for the wrong reasons. As they battle to become prime minister, Conservative party rivals Boris Johnson and Jeremy Hunt are both promising a post-Brexit splurge. Lower taxes and higher government spending would mark an overdue retreat from austerity, and relieve the Bank of England of some of the burden of propping up the economy.

Breakingviews - Boris Johnson may spice up UK central bank race

24 Jun 2019

LONDON (Reuters Breakingviews) - The race to become Britain’s next prime minister has the potential to spice up a different contest: the one to replace Bank of England Governor Mark Carney.

Breakingviews - Mario Draghi will leave one big task undone

19 Jun 2019

SINTRA, Portugal (Reuters Breakingviews) - The European Central Bank’s annual gathering in Portugal is this year as much a celebration of its outgoing president, Mario Draghi, as a deep dive into the euro’s first 20 years. The Italian leaves his as-yet-unnamed successor one big unfinished job: pushing up stubbornly low inflation. But he is helping as much as he can before he goes.

Breakingviews - Central banks can only nudge towards greener world

18 Jun 2019

PARIS (Reuters Breakingviews) - Central bankers are professional worriers. So it’s hardly surprising that they are increasingly fretting about climate change. When it comes to changing behaviour, they can at best nudge rather than shove.

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