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UK Commentary Headlines

Commentary: For Trump, the great Davos face-off

Since its foundation in 1971, the World Economic Forum in Davos has been a byword for the growing consensus around an increasingly globalized world. Now, President Donald Trump is on his way to tell those who consider themselves the global elite that they have been wrong on just about everything.

Harold Evans: Will Davos Man – or Woman – take on Trumpian nihilism?

The tens of millions of fans of the HBO mythical series Game of Thrones boil with frustration. They long to know what happens next in the ancient mountain kingdoms of Westeros where kings and queens and power-mad challengers betray and murder each other with satisfying consistency. HBO is keeping fans in suspense until 2019, so I am happy to bring news of comparable real-life dramas that will assuredly start at the end of this month in peaks as snowed and menacing as the Westeros Frostfangs.

Commentary: What to do when liberals are the censors?

Citizens in authoritarian states know what they can read or publish, see or hear. In places such as China, Russia, Iran, Turkey and Egypt, semi-free private discussion and small-circulation publishing is permitted. But the dissident talk can’t become opposition action. That is cut off, either at the root or when it appears on the streets.

Commentary: Killing the Iran nuclear deal will be bad for the U.S.

After months of threatening to undo the Iran nuclear deal, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), Donald Trump once again opted to extend the deal by waiving economic sanctions on Iran. This was the “last chance,” he declared in a Jan. 12 statement, “to either fix the deal’s disastrous flaws, or the United States will withdraw.”

Commentary: Relax, wage boom won't unleash inflation

Bond yields around the world are rising as the pieces of the inflation jigsaw fall into place: a booming world economy, high and rising oil prices, strong corporate capex spending and the lowest unemployment rates in years, even decades.

Commentary: Why the U.S. should support Iran protesters

In recent weeks, Iran has again been in the throes of an uprising. Signs of the regime change America had long hoped to see are on the horizon. In the unlikeliest cities — once the strongholds of the conservatives — Iranians have taken to the streets, demanding, not just reform, but a referendum.

Commentary: Steve Bannon, Toby Young and the politics of provocation

Two men of the right were pulled from pedestals this past week: one, American, for being a source; the other, British, for having been a columnist. Their rationalizations and attempts at exculpation raise the question: does journalism operate in a space increasingly divorced from sober fact and judgment? Is most of it being enfolded, ever more completely, into entertainment or political intolerance?

Commentary: For euro reforms, growth is the enemy

Europe’s currency union - not so long ago on its sickbed - has started the year in rude health. The winning streak looks set to continue since economic confidence in the euro area is at its highest for almost two decades, but it will have an unwelcome side-effect. The more the euro zone economy thrives, the less pressure there will be on European politicians to take steps to prevent future crises.