Edition:
United Kingdom
Pictures | Thu Apr 25, 2019 | 1:40am BST

German scientists create see-through human organs

Dr. Ali Erturk, Group Leader at the Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research (ISD) at the Ludwig Maximillian's University, looks at a transparent human brain at his laboratory in Munich, Germany April 23, 2019. Researchers in Germany have created transparent human organs using a new technology that could pave the way to print three-dimensional body parts such as kidneys for transplants.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Dr. Ali Erturk, Group Leader at the Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research (ISD) at the Ludwig Maximillian's University, looks at a transparent human brain at his laboratory in Munich, Germany April 23, 2019. Researchers in Germany have created...more

Dr. Ali Erturk, Group Leader at the Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research (ISD) at the Ludwig Maximillian's University, looks at a transparent human brain at his laboratory in Munich, Germany April 23, 2019. Researchers in Germany have created transparent human organs using a new technology that could pave the way to print three-dimensional body parts such as kidneys for transplants. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
Close
1 / 11
Dr. Ali Erturk looks at a transparent mouse at his laboratory. Scientists led by Erturk at Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich have developed a technique that uses a solvent to make organs such as the brain and kidneys transparent.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Dr. Ali Erturk looks at a transparent mouse at his laboratory. Scientists led by Erturk at Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich have developed a technique that uses a solvent to make organs such as the brain and kidneys...more

Dr. Ali Erturk looks at a transparent mouse at his laboratory. Scientists led by Erturk at Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich have developed a technique that uses a solvent to make organs such as the brain and kidneys transparent. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
Close
2 / 11
A transparent human brain is shown. The organ is then scanned by lasers in a microscope that allows researchers to capture the entire structure, including the blood vessels and every single cell in its specific location.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

A transparent human brain is shown. The organ is then scanned by lasers in a microscope that allows researchers to capture the entire structure, including the blood vessels and every single cell in its specific location. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

A transparent human brain is shown. The organ is then scanned by lasers in a microscope that allows researchers to capture the entire structure, including the blood vessels and every single cell in its specific location. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
Close
3 / 11
An employee checks the 3D printing of a scaffold for a kidney. Using this blueprint, researchers print out the scaffold of the organ. They then load the 3D printer with stem cells which act as "ink" and are injected into the correct position making the organ functional.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

An employee checks the 3D printing of a scaffold for a kidney. Using this blueprint, researchers print out the scaffold of the organ. They then load the 3D printer with stem cells which act as "ink" and are injected into the correct position making...more

An employee checks the 3D printing of a scaffold for a kidney. Using this blueprint, researchers print out the scaffold of the organ. They then load the 3D printer with stem cells which act as "ink" and are injected into the correct position making the organ functional. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
Close
4 / 11
An employee works with stem cells. While 3D printing is already used widely to produce spare parts for industry, Erturk said the development marks a step forward for 3D printing in the medical field.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

An employee works with stem cells. While 3D printing is already used widely to produce spare parts for industry, Erturk said the development marks a step forward for 3D printing in the medical field. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

An employee works with stem cells. While 3D printing is already used widely to produce spare parts for industry, Erturk said the development marks a step forward for 3D printing in the medical field. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
Close
5 / 11
A transparent mouse is pictured at the laboratory of Dr. Ali Erturk. Until now 3D-printed organs lacked detailed cellular structures because they were based on images from computer tomography or MRI machines, he said. "We can see where every single cell is located in transparent human organs. And then we can actually replicate exactly the same, using 3D bioprinting technology to make a real functional organ," he said. "Therefore, I believe we are much closer to a real human organ for the first time now."

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

A transparent mouse is pictured at the laboratory of Dr. Ali Erturk. Until now 3D-printed organs lacked detailed cellular structures because they were based on images from computer tomography or MRI machines, he said. "We can see where every single...more

A transparent mouse is pictured at the laboratory of Dr. Ali Erturk. Until now 3D-printed organs lacked detailed cellular structures because they were based on images from computer tomography or MRI machines, he said. "We can see where every single cell is located in transparent human organs. And then we can actually replicate exactly the same, using 3D bioprinting technology to make a real functional organ," he said. "Therefore, I believe we are much closer to a real human organ for the first time now." REUTERS/Michael Dalder
Close
6 / 11
Dr. Ali Erturk works at his laboratory. Erturk's team plan to start by creating a bioprinted pancreas over the next 2-3 years and also hope to develop a kidney within 5-6 years.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Dr. Ali Erturk works at his laboratory. Erturk's team plan to start by creating a bioprinted pancreas over the next 2-3 years and also hope to develop a kidney within 5-6 years. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Dr. Ali Erturk works at his laboratory. Erturk's team plan to start by creating a bioprinted pancreas over the next 2-3 years and also hope to develop a kidney within 5-6 years. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
Close
7 / 11
Dr. Ali Erturk works at a laser microscope at his laboratory. The researchers will first test to see whether animals can survive with the bioprinted organs and could start clinical trials within 5-10 years, he said.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Dr. Ali Erturk works at a laser microscope at his laboratory. The researchers will first test to see whether animals can survive with the bioprinted organs and could start clinical trials within 5-10 years, he said. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Dr. Ali Erturk works at a laser microscope at his laboratory. The researchers will first test to see whether animals can survive with the bioprinted organs and could start clinical trials within 5-10 years, he said. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
Close
8 / 11
Dr. Ali Erturk works at a laser microscope at his laboratory.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Dr. Ali Erturk works at a laser microscope at his laboratory. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Dr. Ali Erturk works at a laser microscope at his laboratory. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
Close
9 / 11
An employee works with stem cells.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

An employee works with stem cells. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

An employee works with stem cells. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
Close
10 / 11
An employee checks the 3D printing of a scaffold for a kidney.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

An employee checks the 3D printing of a scaffold for a kidney. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

An employee checks the 3D printing of a scaffold for a kidney. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
Close
11 / 11

Next Slideshows

Funeral for Northern Ireland journalist Lyra McKee

The leaders of Britain and Ireland joined hundreds of mourners at the funeral of journalist Lyra McKee, whose killing by an Irish nationalist militant during a...

24 Apr 2019

Arrests at London climate-change protests top 1,000

At least 1,000 people have been arrested during climate change demonstrations across London by Extinction Rebellion.

24 Apr 2019

Mourning in Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka holds a national day of mourning after suicide bomb attacks on churches holding Easter services and luxury hotels killed 321 people in the country s...

24 Apr 2019

Time 100 Gala red carpet

Style from the Time 100 Gala red carpet.

24 Apr 2019

MORE IN PICTURES

Editor's Choice Pictures

Editor's Choice Pictures

Our top photos from the past 24 hours.

Protests in Puerto Rico

Protests in Puerto Rico

Thousands take part in demonstrations to demand that Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rossello resign over offensive chat messages.

Best of Tour de France

Best of Tour de France

Highlights from all the stages of the Tour de France.

Widespread blackout hits Venezuela

Widespread blackout hits Venezuela

More than half of Venezuela s 23 states lost power according to Reuters witnesses and reports on social media, a blackout the government blamed on an electromagnetic attack.

Profile: Boris Johnson

Profile: Boris Johnson

Boris Johnson is elected leader of the governing Conservative Party and Britain's next prime minister.

Jeffrey Epstein's private Caribbean island

Jeffrey Epstein's private Caribbean island

Aerial images of Jeffrey Epstein's 70-acre private island in the Caribbean.

Strong winds reignite wildfires in central Portugal

Strong winds reignite wildfires in central Portugal

More than 1,000 firefighters battled wildfires in central Portugal forcing the evacuation of several villages as the authorities hoped to limit the number of residents at risk.

Notable deaths in 2019

Notable deaths in 2019

Newsmakers and celebrities who have died this year.

Living statues take over Belgian town

Living statues take over Belgian town

Participants in the 'Statues en Marche' festival in Marche-en-Famenne, Belgium.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast