Edition:
United Kingdom
Pictures | Wed May 27, 2020 | 2:38pm BST

Giving birth in the time of COVID-19

Rusia Goes carries her prematurely born daughter Luisa after she was released from the hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, May 25, 2020. Goes gave birth while unconscious and breathing through a ventilator tube in April as she battled severe COVID-19 symptoms. Doctors recommended a premature birth by cesarean section in her eighth month of pregnancy, to better treat the mother's condition. The baby tested negative for the virus and was isolated from Goes, who was transferred to another hospital as her condition worsened. It would be nearly a month before the 42-year-old was reunited with her newborn daughter. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes

Rusia Goes carries her prematurely born daughter Luisa after she was released from the hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, May 25, 2020. Goes gave birth while unconscious and breathing through a ventilator tube in April as she battled severe COVID-19...more

Rusia Goes carries her prematurely born daughter Luisa after she was released from the hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, May 25, 2020. Goes gave birth while unconscious and breathing through a ventilator tube in April as she battled severe COVID-19 symptoms. Doctors recommended a premature birth by cesarean section in her eighth month of pregnancy, to better treat the mother's condition. The baby tested negative for the virus and was isolated from Goes, who was transferred to another hospital as her condition worsened. It would be nearly a month before the 42-year-old was reunited with her newborn daughter. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
Close
1 / 29
A nurse takes a video of a newborn baby in the maternity ward at Frimley Park Hospital to send to the parents as visiting hours are restricted, in Surrey, Britain, May 22, 2020. Steve Parsons/Pool via REUTERS

A nurse takes a video of a newborn baby in the maternity ward at Frimley Park Hospital to send to the parents as visiting hours are restricted, in Surrey, Britain, May 22, 2020. Steve Parsons/Pool via REUTERS

A nurse takes a video of a newborn baby in the maternity ward at Frimley Park Hospital to send to the parents as visiting hours are restricted, in Surrey, Britain, May 22, 2020. Steve Parsons/Pool via REUTERS
Close
2 / 29
Neonatal Nurse Kirsty Hartley carries premature baby Theo Anderson to his mother Kirsty Anderson in the neonatal intensive care unit at the Lancashire Women and Newborn Centre at Burnley General Hospital in East Lancashire, Burnley, Britain May 15, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay/Pool

Neonatal Nurse Kirsty Hartley carries premature baby Theo Anderson to his mother Kirsty Anderson in the neonatal intensive care unit at the Lancashire Women and Newborn Centre at Burnley General Hospital in East Lancashire, Burnley, Britain May 15,...more

Neonatal Nurse Kirsty Hartley carries premature baby Theo Anderson to his mother Kirsty Anderson in the neonatal intensive care unit at the Lancashire Women and Newborn Centre at Burnley General Hospital in East Lancashire, Burnley, Britain May 15, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay/Pool
Close
3 / 29
Daniel and Cheryl Sanchez of Seattle, Washington, introduce their two-week-old baby to grandparents Rosemary and Roland Berezan of Surrey, during a roadside meet up along the Canada-U.S. border, closed to non-essential travel as the family gathered for Mother's Day in Langley, British Columbia, Canada May 10, 2020. REUTERS/Jennifer Gauthier

Daniel and Cheryl Sanchez of Seattle, Washington, introduce their two-week-old baby to grandparents Rosemary and Roland Berezan of Surrey, during a roadside meet up along the Canada-U.S. border, closed to non-essential travel as the family gathered...more

Daniel and Cheryl Sanchez of Seattle, Washington, introduce their two-week-old baby to grandparents Rosemary and Roland Berezan of Surrey, during a roadside meet up along the Canada-U.S. border, closed to non-essential travel as the family gathered for Mother's Day in Langley, British Columbia, Canada May 10, 2020. REUTERS/Jennifer Gauthier
Close
4 / 29
Nurses and newborns are seen in the Hotel Venice owned by BioTexCom clinic in Kiev, Ukraine May 14, 2020. Lying in rows of cots, 51 babies born to surrogate mothers are stranded in Ukraine as the coronavirus lockdown is preventing parents from the United States, Europe and elsewhere from collecting them. Ukraine imposed a ban on foreigners entering in March, and most parents have only seen their newborns through pictures and video calls with the clinic. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

Nurses and newborns are seen in the Hotel Venice owned by BioTexCom clinic in Kiev, Ukraine May 14, 2020. Lying in rows of cots, 51 babies born to surrogate mothers are stranded in Ukraine as the coronavirus lockdown is preventing parents from the...more

Nurses and newborns are seen in the Hotel Venice owned by BioTexCom clinic in Kiev, Ukraine May 14, 2020. Lying in rows of cots, 51 babies born to surrogate mothers are stranded in Ukraine as the coronavirus lockdown is preventing parents from the United States, Europe and elsewhere from collecting them. Ukraine imposed a ban on foreigners entering in March, and most parents have only seen their newborns through pictures and video calls with the clinic. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
Close
5 / 29
Kathrine, Stuart and their daughter Ruby leave Blackpool Victoria Hospital, after recovering from the coronavirus in Blackpool, Britain May 4, 2020. BLACKPOOL TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION via REUTERS

Kathrine, Stuart and their daughter Ruby leave Blackpool Victoria Hospital, after recovering from the coronavirus in Blackpool, Britain May 4, 2020. BLACKPOOL TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION via REUTERS

Kathrine, Stuart and their daughter Ruby leave Blackpool Victoria Hospital, after recovering from the coronavirus in Blackpool, Britain May 4, 2020. BLACKPOOL TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION via REUTERS
Close
6 / 29
Pregnant women wearing face masks pray to Our Lady of Childbirth inside the Cathedral, as some Spanish provinces are allowed to ease lockdown restrictions during phase one, in Valencia, Spain May 19, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Pregnant women wearing face masks pray to Our Lady of Childbirth inside the Cathedral, as some Spanish provinces are allowed to ease lockdown restrictions during phase one, in Valencia, Spain May 19, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Pregnant women wearing face masks pray to Our Lady of Childbirth inside the Cathedral, as some Spanish provinces are allowed to ease lockdown restrictions during phase one, in Valencia, Spain May 19, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
Close
7 / 29
Sara Lima de Araujo, 28, who is pregnant and suffers from the coronavirus, is carried into an ambulance by a healthcare worker after arriving from Coari to Manaus in an ICU jet, in Brazil, May 18, 2020. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly

Sara Lima de Araujo, 28, who is pregnant and suffers from the coronavirus, is carried into an ambulance by a healthcare worker after arriving from Coari to Manaus in an ICU jet, in Brazil, May 18, 2020. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly

Sara Lima de Araujo, 28, who is pregnant and suffers from the coronavirus, is carried into an ambulance by a healthcare worker after arriving from Coari to Manaus in an ICU jet, in Brazil, May 18, 2020. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly
Close
8 / 29
Newborn baby Phuc An, wearing a protective face shield, is seen before leaving home for his vaccination in Hanoi, Vietnam April 13, 2020. Phuc An was born at Vinmec hospital in Hanoi on April 1, when the Southeast Asian country started strict restrictions on movement to contain the coronavirus. The three-week lockdown put most of the social and economic activities throughout the country on hold, but life must go on, and giving birth couldn't be delayed. REUTERS/Kham

Newborn baby Phuc An, wearing a protective face shield, is seen before leaving home for his vaccination in Hanoi, Vietnam April 13, 2020. Phuc An was born at Vinmec hospital in Hanoi on April 1, when the Southeast Asian country started strict...more

Newborn baby Phuc An, wearing a protective face shield, is seen before leaving home for his vaccination in Hanoi, Vietnam April 13, 2020. Phuc An was born at Vinmec hospital in Hanoi on April 1, when the Southeast Asian country started strict restrictions on movement to contain the coronavirus. The three-week lockdown put most of the social and economic activities throughout the country on hold, but life must go on, and giving birth couldn't be delayed. REUTERS/Kham
Close
9 / 29
A nurse attends to newborn baby Phuc An after he was born in Vinmec hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam April 1, 2020. REUTERS/Kham

A nurse attends to newborn baby Phuc An after he was born in Vinmec hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam April 1, 2020. REUTERS/Kham

A nurse attends to newborn baby Phuc An after he was born in Vinmec hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam April 1, 2020. REUTERS/Kham
Close
10 / 29
Amandine, who tested positive for COVID-19 just before giving birth, wears a protective face mask while holding her newborn daughter Mahaut at CHIREC Delta Hospital in Brussels, Belgium April 25, 2020. Baby Mahaut was born on April 23 in Brussels by cesarean section because of earlier complications not linked to COVID-19, but which led to mother Amandine being tested, even though she showed no symptoms. "They told me they would test me for COVID-19 and I thought it would be negative. The next day, my gynecologist called me to tell me that it was positive, I nearly fell off my chair," Amandine, who asked not to give her surname, told Reuters. Wearing a blue medical mask lying in a hospital bed and holding her baby to her chest, Amandine said it had been hard to give birth alone. "I was so afraid for her ... it was a very peculiar birth, I only saw her for two minutes," Amandine said, explaining how she was then moved to a surgery unit in the hospital to reduce the risk of spreading the virus.

 REUTERS/Yves Herman

Amandine, who tested positive for COVID-19 just before giving birth, wears a protective face mask while holding her newborn daughter Mahaut at CHIREC Delta Hospital in Brussels, Belgium April 25, 2020. Baby Mahaut was born on April 23 in Brussels by...more

Amandine, who tested positive for COVID-19 just before giving birth, wears a protective face mask while holding her newborn daughter Mahaut at CHIREC Delta Hospital in Brussels, Belgium April 25, 2020. Baby Mahaut was born on April 23 in Brussels by cesarean section because of earlier complications not linked to COVID-19, but which led to mother Amandine being tested, even though she showed no symptoms. "They told me they would test me for COVID-19 and I thought it would be negative. The next day, my gynecologist called me to tell me that it was positive, I nearly fell off my chair," Amandine, who asked not to give her surname, told Reuters. Wearing a blue medical mask lying in a hospital bed and holding her baby to her chest, Amandine said it had been hard to give birth alone. "I was so afraid for her ... it was a very peculiar birth, I only saw her for two minutes," Amandine said, explaining how she was then moved to a surgery unit in the hospital to reduce the risk of spreading the virus.  REUTERS/Yves Herman
Close
11 / 29
Rafiqa Ibrahim Radi watches a recorded video of her newborn son at her home in Basra, Iraq April 26, 2020. It has been more than a month since the mother last saw her son Seif. The 33-year-old from Basra faced a difficult pregnancy with life-threatening complications. Medical staff at her local Basra hospital advised her to seek treatment in Ahvaz, Iran, where she gave birth via C-section three months before her due date. Rafiqa remained at her newborn's side for 20 days, until the medical staff advised her to return to Basra while Seif recovered in the neonatal intensive care unit. About two weeks ago, the family finally received the good news: Seif was strong enough to make the trip back to Iraq. But by then, the border between Iran and Iraq had already shut down due to both governments' efforts to curb the spread of the coronavirus. Since the border closure on March 8, 2020, the two-hour car drive from Basra to Ahvaz had become impossible.

REUTERS/Mohammed Aty

Rafiqa Ibrahim Radi watches a recorded video of her newborn son at her home in Basra, Iraq April 26, 2020. It has been more than a month since the mother last saw her son Seif. The 33-year-old from Basra faced a difficult pregnancy with...more

Rafiqa Ibrahim Radi watches a recorded video of her newborn son at her home in Basra, Iraq April 26, 2020. It has been more than a month since the mother last saw her son Seif. The 33-year-old from Basra faced a difficult pregnancy with life-threatening complications. Medical staff at her local Basra hospital advised her to seek treatment in Ahvaz, Iran, where she gave birth via C-section three months before her due date. Rafiqa remained at her newborn's side for 20 days, until the medical staff advised her to return to Basra while Seif recovered in the neonatal intensive care unit. About two weeks ago, the family finally received the good news: Seif was strong enough to make the trip back to Iraq. But by then, the border between Iran and Iraq had already shut down due to both governments' efforts to curb the spread of the coronavirus. Since the border closure on March 8, 2020, the two-hour car drive from Basra to Ahvaz had become impossible. REUTERS/Mohammed Aty
Close
12 / 29
A nurse holds a one-month-old Thai baby, the country's youngest COVID-19 patient who has successfully recovered, a day before being discharged from Bamrasnaradura Infectious Diseases Institute in Bangkok, Thailand April 22, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

A nurse holds a one-month-old Thai baby, the country's youngest COVID-19 patient who has successfully recovered, a day before being discharged from Bamrasnaradura Infectious Diseases Institute in Bangkok, Thailand April 22, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

A nurse holds a one-month-old Thai baby, the country's youngest COVID-19 patient who has successfully recovered, a day before being discharged from Bamrasnaradura Infectious Diseases Institute in Bangkok, Thailand April 22, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
13 / 29
Stephanie Bowers, who is eight months pregnant, poses for a photograph in her lounge, Manchester, Britain April 9, 2020. Bowers is worried that she won't be able to have her husband with her during the birth. "As a soon-to-be first-time mother, everything about it is so unknown," Bowers said.

REUTERS/Phil Noble

Stephanie Bowers, who is eight months pregnant, poses for a photograph in her lounge, Manchester, Britain April 9, 2020. Bowers is worried that she won't be able to have her husband with her during the birth. "As a soon-to-be first-time mother,...more

Stephanie Bowers, who is eight months pregnant, poses for a photograph in her lounge, Manchester, Britain April 9, 2020. Bowers is worried that she won't be able to have her husband with her during the birth. "As a soon-to-be first-time mother, everything about it is so unknown," Bowers said. REUTERS/Phil Noble
Close
14 / 29
Nancy Pedroza experiences contractions, as she is placed onto an ambulance stretcher to be taken to hospital by paramedics, after her unborn child's heart beat dropped from 130 beats per minute to 30, while she was in labor during a homebirth in Fort Worth, Texas, April 8, 2020. Pedroza was convinced the hospital was the safest place to have her baby. That conviction turned to doubt when in late March most U.S. states ordered residents to stay home and hospitals and doctors began taking new precautions to protect pregnant women and their babies against the novel coronavirus sweeping the nation. So, at 40 weeks pregnant, she turned to a midwife to help her have a home birth. REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare

Nancy Pedroza experiences contractions, as she is placed onto an ambulance stretcher to be taken to hospital by paramedics, after her unborn child's heart beat dropped from 130 beats per minute to 30, while she was in labor during a homebirth in Fort...more

Nancy Pedroza experiences contractions, as she is placed onto an ambulance stretcher to be taken to hospital by paramedics, after her unborn child's heart beat dropped from 130 beats per minute to 30, while she was in labor during a homebirth in Fort Worth, Texas, April 8, 2020. Pedroza was convinced the hospital was the safest place to have her baby. That conviction turned to doubt when in late March most U.S. states ordered residents to stay home and hospitals and doctors began taking new precautions to protect pregnant women and their babies against the novel coronavirus sweeping the nation. So, at 40 weeks pregnant, she turned to a midwife to help her have a home birth. REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare
Close
15 / 29
Midwife Juanita Zarate Solorza helps Mariana, 29, give birth to her third child in a local clinic instead of a nearby hospital in Union Hidalgo, Mexico April 19, 2020. Zarate says she has helped deliver hundreds of babies in 45 years working as a midwife in an indigenous community in southern Mexico. Now, demand for her services is more intense than ever as women seek to avoid giving birth in hospitals, where they fear becoming infected with the rapidly spreading coronavirus. Zarate said she has four deliveries scheduled for the rest of this month and about half a dozen in May, up from her usual rate of two to three scheduled births per month. And more women may arrive in their hour of need without appointments.

REUTERS/Jose de Jesus Cortes

Midwife Juanita Zarate Solorza helps Mariana, 29, give birth to her third child in a local clinic instead of a nearby hospital in Union Hidalgo, Mexico April 19, 2020. Zarate says she has helped deliver hundreds of babies in 45 years working as a...more

Midwife Juanita Zarate Solorza helps Mariana, 29, give birth to her third child in a local clinic instead of a nearby hospital in Union Hidalgo, Mexico April 19, 2020. Zarate says she has helped deliver hundreds of babies in 45 years working as a midwife in an indigenous community in southern Mexico. Now, demand for her services is more intense than ever as women seek to avoid giving birth in hospitals, where they fear becoming infected with the rapidly spreading coronavirus. Zarate said she has four deliveries scheduled for the rest of this month and about half a dozen in May, up from her usual rate of two to three scheduled births per month. And more women may arrive in their hour of need without appointments. REUTERS/Jose de Jesus Cortes
Close
16 / 29
Photographer Evgenia Danigevich, 27, enjoys time with her newborn son Platon at home in Moscow, Russia May 4, 2020. Evgenia is originally from Tiraspol in Moldova's breakaway Transdniestria region. Her parents live there and are unable to come to Moscow due to lockdown measures. REUTERS/Evgenia Novozhenina

Photographer Evgenia Danigevich, 27, enjoys time with her newborn son Platon at home in Moscow, Russia May 4, 2020. Evgenia is originally from Tiraspol in Moldova's breakaway Transdniestria region. Her parents live there and are unable to come to...more

Photographer Evgenia Danigevich, 27, enjoys time with her newborn son Platon at home in Moscow, Russia May 4, 2020. Evgenia is originally from Tiraspol in Moldova's breakaway Transdniestria region. Her parents live there and are unable to come to Moscow due to lockdown measures. REUTERS/Evgenia Novozhenina
Close
17 / 29
Hashim, an essential worker in the healthcare industry, sees his newborn niece for the first time as he greets his daughter and nephew through the closed door as he maintains social distance from his family as he works amid the outbreak in New Rochelle, New York, April 20, 2020.  REUTERS/Joy Malone

Hashim, an essential worker in the healthcare industry, sees his newborn niece for the first time as he greets his daughter and nephew through the closed door as he maintains social distance from his family as he works amid the outbreak in New...more

Hashim, an essential worker in the healthcare industry, sees his newborn niece for the first time as he greets his daughter and nephew through the closed door as he maintains social distance from his family as he works amid the outbreak in New Rochelle, New York, April 20, 2020.  REUTERS/Joy Malone
Close
18 / 29
Nurses hold newborn babies wearing protective face shields at the Praram 9 hospital in Bangkok, Thailand, April 9, 2020. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

Nurses hold newborn babies wearing protective face shields at the Praram 9 hospital in Bangkok, Thailand, April 9, 2020. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

Nurses hold newborn babies wearing protective face shields at the Praram 9 hospital in Bangkok, Thailand, April 9, 2020. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
Close
19 / 29
Noemie Bouchet, Arnaud Joal and their newborn daughter Bertille talk by video with relatives unable to visit due to France's lockdown, in Geneva, Switzerland, April 14, 2020. Bouchet and Joal were infected with COVID-19 last month, the maternity unit was operating under lockdown and their relatives live across closed borders, yet like millions of other babies, Bertille arrived without a hitch. The couple welcomed Bertille - for "heroine" or "bright maiden" - into the world in Geneva on April 9.  Border closures and French confinement measures bar their families, who live over the border in nearby France, from visiting their newest family member. "Her grandmothers will remind her that they were not able to see her right away and that it was difficult!" Bouchet said.

REUTERS/Denis Balibouse

Noemie Bouchet, Arnaud Joal and their newborn daughter Bertille talk by video with relatives unable to visit due to France's lockdown, in Geneva, Switzerland, April 14, 2020. Bouchet and Joal were infected with COVID-19 last month, the maternity unit...more

Noemie Bouchet, Arnaud Joal and their newborn daughter Bertille talk by video with relatives unable to visit due to France's lockdown, in Geneva, Switzerland, April 14, 2020. Bouchet and Joal were infected with COVID-19 last month, the maternity unit was operating under lockdown and their relatives live across closed borders, yet like millions of other babies, Bertille arrived without a hitch. The couple welcomed Bertille - for "heroine" or "bright maiden" - into the world in Geneva on April 9. Border closures and French confinement measures bar their families, who live over the border in nearby France, from visiting their newest family member. "Her grandmothers will remind her that they were not able to see her right away and that it was difficult!" Bouchet said. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
Close
20 / 29
Nuria Bravo, 38, shows to her neighbors her newborn son Jesus next to her husband Francisco Pimentel, 40, and their children Cristina, 8, and Daniel, 11, as they greet to the neighbors from the balcony of their house during a lockdown in Ronda, southern Spain, April 22, 2020. REUTERS/Jon Nazca

Nuria Bravo, 38, shows to her neighbors her newborn son Jesus next to her husband Francisco Pimentel, 40, and their children Cristina, 8, and Daniel, 11, as they greet to the neighbors from the balcony of their house during a lockdown in Ronda,...more

Nuria Bravo, 38, shows to her neighbors her newborn son Jesus next to her husband Francisco Pimentel, 40, and their children Cristina, 8, and Daniel, 11, as they greet to the neighbors from the balcony of their house during a lockdown in Ronda, southern Spain, April 22, 2020. REUTERS/Jon Nazca
Close
21 / 29
Dr Greg Gulbransen speaks with the parents of a 2-day-old newborn while maintaining visits with both his regular patients and those confirmed to have COVID-19 at his pediatric practice in Oyster Bay, New York, April 13, 2020. With New York's healthcare system at full throttle treating coronavirus patients, Gulbransen wants to take no risks. His motto is: "Whatever you do, don't send someone from this office to the ER." REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Dr Greg Gulbransen speaks with the parents of a 2-day-old newborn while maintaining visits with both his regular patients and those confirmed to have COVID-19 at his pediatric practice in Oyster Bay, New York, April 13, 2020. With New York's...more

Dr Greg Gulbransen speaks with the parents of a 2-day-old newborn while maintaining visits with both his regular patients and those confirmed to have COVID-19 at his pediatric practice in Oyster Bay, New York, April 13, 2020. With New York's healthcare system at full throttle treating coronavirus patients, Gulbransen wants to take no risks. His motto is: "Whatever you do, don't send someone from this office to the ER." REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Close
22 / 29
Naomi Hassebroek and her son Felix look at her sister's newborn baby through a glass door while dropping off a bag of supplies for Easter Sunday in Brooklyn, New York City, April 11, 2020. REUTERS/Caitlin Ochs

Naomi Hassebroek and her son Felix look at her sister's newborn baby through a glass door while dropping off a bag of supplies for Easter Sunday in Brooklyn, New York City, April 11, 2020. REUTERS/Caitlin Ochs

Naomi Hassebroek and her son Felix look at her sister's newborn baby through a glass door while dropping off a bag of supplies for Easter Sunday in Brooklyn, New York City, April 11, 2020. REUTERS/Caitlin Ochs
Close
23 / 29
Chiropractor Dr Kolleen Gregory adjusts 4 day-old Raiz Paredes, while his mother Marylou Ojeda video chats with a pediatric dentist, during a home visit in Rosemead, California, April 23, 2020. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

Chiropractor Dr Kolleen Gregory adjusts 4 day-old Raiz Paredes, while his mother Marylou Ojeda video chats with a pediatric dentist, during a home visit in Rosemead, California, April 23, 2020. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

Chiropractor Dr Kolleen Gregory adjusts 4 day-old Raiz Paredes, while his mother Marylou Ojeda video chats with a pediatric dentist, during a home visit in Rosemead, California, April 23, 2020. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni
Close
24 / 29
Will Watson looks through the window at his newborn niece whilst dropping off shopping supplies to his sister's home in Streatham, south London, Britain, April 18, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

Will Watson looks through the window at his newborn niece whilst dropping off shopping supplies to his sister's home in Streatham, south London, Britain, April 18, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

Will Watson looks through the window at his newborn niece whilst dropping off shopping supplies to his sister's home in Streatham, south London, Britain, April 18, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
Close
25 / 29
A nurse wearing a protective face mask and gloves takes care of a new born baby in a maternity room, in Najaf, Iraq April 2, 2020. REUTERS/Alaa al-Marjani

A nurse wearing a protective face mask and gloves takes care of a new born baby in a maternity room, in Najaf, Iraq April 2, 2020. REUTERS/Alaa al-Marjani

A nurse wearing a protective face mask and gloves takes care of a new born baby in a maternity room, in Najaf, Iraq April 2, 2020. REUTERS/Alaa al-Marjani
Close
26 / 29
Emergency medicine physician Thomas Krajewski wears a mask as he holds his baby Cal with his wife Genevieve after finishing his shift in New Orleans, Louisiana, March 27, 2020.  REUTERS/Kathleen Flynn

Emergency medicine physician Thomas Krajewski wears a mask as he holds his baby Cal with his wife Genevieve after finishing his shift in New Orleans, Louisiana, March 27, 2020.  REUTERS/Kathleen Flynn

Emergency medicine physician Thomas Krajewski wears a mask as he holds his baby Cal with his wife Genevieve after finishing his shift in New Orleans, Louisiana, March 27, 2020.  REUTERS/Kathleen Flynn
Close
27 / 29
A nurse wearing a protective suit holds a newborn baby in the maternity room in Depok, near Jakarta, Indonesia, April 13, 2020. REUTERS/Ajeng Dinar Ulfiana

A nurse wearing a protective suit holds a newborn baby in the maternity room in Depok, near Jakarta, Indonesia, April 13, 2020. REUTERS/Ajeng Dinar Ulfiana

A nurse wearing a protective suit holds a newborn baby in the maternity room in Depok, near Jakarta, Indonesia, April 13, 2020. REUTERS/Ajeng Dinar Ulfiana
Close
28 / 29
A nurse in protective suit attends to a baby with COVID-19 at an isolation ward in Wuhan Children's Hospital in Wuhan, Hubei province, China March 16, 2020. China Daily via REUTERS

A nurse in protective suit attends to a baby with COVID-19 at an isolation ward in Wuhan Children's Hospital in Wuhan, Hubei province, China March 16, 2020. China Daily via REUTERS

A nurse in protective suit attends to a baby with COVID-19 at an isolation ward in Wuhan Children's Hospital in Wuhan, Hubei province, China March 16, 2020. China Daily via REUTERS
Close
29 / 29

Next Slideshows

Muslims mark end of Ramadan with Eid celebrations

Eid al-Fitr celebrations mark the end of Ramadan, the Muslim holy month that has been altered by coronavirus restrictions on group prayers and public iftars.

24 May 2020

Ramadan in a pandemic

During the holy month of Ramadan, Muslims the world over join their families to break the fast at sunset and go to mosques to pray. But the pandemic has changed...

20 May 2020

Nature reclaims public spaces during lockdown

Creatures both wild and domesticated move into urban spaces that are now empty during coronavirus lockdowns around the world.

20 May 2020

Empty streets of New York City

Shuttered stores, deserted office buildings and nearly vacant subway cars serve as stark daily reminders of how much New York City has changed in a matter of...

13 May 2020

MORE IN PICTURES

Massive blast in Beirut sends shockwaves across city

Massive blast in Beirut sends shockwaves across city

Lebanese rescue teams pulled out bodies and hunted for missing in the wreckage of buildings as investigations blamed negligence for a massive warehouse explosion that sent a devastating blast wave across Beirut, killing at least 135 people and injuring more than 5,000.

Aerial views of our pandemic-hit world

Aerial views of our pandemic-hit world

Scenes from above around the world amid the coronavirus.

Life in the age of coronavirus

Life in the age of coronavirus

People around the world adapt to a new normal of staying at home, social distancing and masks during the coronavirus pandemic.

Top Photos of the Day

Top Photos of the Day

Our top photos from the past 24 hours.

Lavender fields draw selfie-seeking visitors

Lavender fields draw selfie-seeking visitors

Visitors line up the perfect picture of purple at Hitchin Lavender farm in Ickleford, Britain.

Notable deaths in 2020

Notable deaths in 2020

Newsmakers and celebrities who have died this year.

Memberships in Black gun clubs on the rise

Memberships in Black gun clubs on the rise

The insecurity brought on by COVID-19 lockdowns and the anger following the police killing of George Floyd has led to higher levels of gun ownership, especially among African Americans.

Hundreds of prisoners flee before Afghan forces end Islamic State jail siege

Hundreds of prisoners flee before Afghan forces end Islamic State jail siege

Afghan security forces on Monday killed at least 10 Islamic State fighters who had taken control of a prison in the eastern city of Jalalabad, ending a siege in which hundreds of prisoners escaped.

Top Photos of the Day

Top Photos of the Day

Our top photos from the past 24 hours.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast