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Pictures | Wed Dec 4, 2019 | 10:55pm GMT

Law experts testify in Trump impeachment hearing

Pamela Karlan, co-director of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic at Stanford University Law School, sits among witnesses Noah Feldman, a professor of law at Harvard University Law School; Michael Gerhardt, professor of law at University of North Carolina School of Law; and Jonathan Turley, professor of law at George Washington University Law School, during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on the impeachment Inquiry into President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, December 4, 2019. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Pamela Karlan, co-director of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic at Stanford University Law School, sits among witnesses Noah Feldman, a professor of law at Harvard University Law School; Michael Gerhardt, professor of law at University of North...more

Pamela Karlan, co-director of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic at Stanford University Law School, sits among witnesses Noah Feldman, a professor of law at Harvard University Law School; Michael Gerhardt, professor of law at University of North Carolina School of Law; and Jonathan Turley, professor of law at George Washington University Law School, during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on the impeachment Inquiry into President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, December 4, 2019. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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U.S. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) speaks with Republican ranking member Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA) during a House Judiciary Committee hearing. Saul Loeb/Pool via REUTERS

U.S. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) speaks with Republican ranking member Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA) during a House Judiciary Committee hearing. Saul Loeb/Pool via REUTERS

U.S. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) speaks with Republican ranking member Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA) during a House Judiciary Committee hearing. Saul Loeb/Pool via REUTERS
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"The president's conduct described by the testimony embodies the (Constitution's) framers' concern that a sitting president would corruptly abuse the powers of office to distort the outcome of a presidential election in his favor," Harvard University law professor Noah Feldman told the panel. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

"The president's conduct described by the testimony embodies the (Constitution's) framers' concern that a sitting president would corruptly abuse the powers of office to distort the outcome of a presidential election in his favor," Harvard University...more

"The president's conduct described by the testimony embodies the (Constitution's) framers' concern that a sitting president would corruptly abuse the powers of office to distort the outcome of a presidential election in his favor," Harvard University law professor Noah Feldman told the panel. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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A Capitol police officer watches from in front of a video monitor displaying definitions of "High Crimes and Misdemeanors" as the U.S. House Judiciary Committee holds their first hearing. REUTERS/Loren Elliott

A Capitol police officer watches from in front of a video monitor displaying definitions of "High Crimes and Misdemeanors" as the U.S. House Judiciary Committee holds their first hearing. REUTERS/Loren Elliott

A Capitol police officer watches from in front of a video monitor displaying definitions of "High Crimes and Misdemeanors" as the U.S. House Judiciary Committee holds their first hearing. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
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Stanford University law school professor Pamela Karlan said Trump abused his power by demanding foreign involvement in a U.S. election, adding that the president's actions "struck at the very heart of what makes this country the republic to which we pledge allegiance."

Karlan said the evidence showed that Trump sought to "strong arm" Zelenskiy into smearing one of his rivals, adding, "This is not politics as usual - at least not in the United States or any other mature democracy. It is, instead, a cardinal reason by the Constitution contains an impeachment power."

She pushed back at Republican Doug Collins for saying the witnesses could not have absorbed the evidence gathered in the inquiry. "I'm insulted by the suggestion that as a law professor I don't care about those facts," Karlan said. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Stanford University law school professor Pamela Karlan said Trump abused his power by demanding foreign involvement in a U.S. election, adding that the president's actions "struck at the very heart of what makes this country the republic to which we...more

Stanford University law school professor Pamela Karlan said Trump abused his power by demanding foreign involvement in a U.S. election, adding that the president's actions "struck at the very heart of what makes this country the republic to which we pledge allegiance." Karlan said the evidence showed that Trump sought to "strong arm" Zelenskiy into smearing one of his rivals, adding, "This is not politics as usual - at least not in the United States or any other mature democracy. It is, instead, a cardinal reason by the Constitution contains an impeachment power." She pushed back at Republican Doug Collins for saying the witnesses could not have absorbed the evidence gathered in the inquiry. "I'm insulted by the suggestion that as a law professor I don't care about those facts," Karlan said. REUTERS/Tom Brenner
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Members of the public use binoculars as they watch the House Judiciary Committee hearing. Saul Loeb/Pool via REUTERS

Members of the public use binoculars as they watch the House Judiciary Committee hearing. Saul Loeb/Pool via REUTERS

Members of the public use binoculars as they watch the House Judiciary Committee hearing. Saul Loeb/Pool via REUTERS
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George Washington University Law School Professor Jonathan Turley, the only witness chosen by the Republicans, said the current evidence does not adequately support the Democrats' allegations against Trump.

Still, Turley admonished Trump over the call to Zelenskiy - disagreeing with Trump that the conversation was "perfect" - and said leveraging U.S. military aid to investigate a political opponent "if proven, can be an impeachable offense." REUTERS/Mike Segar

George Washington University Law School Professor Jonathan Turley, the only witness chosen by the Republicans, said the current evidence does not adequately support the Democrats' allegations against Trump. Still, Turley admonished Trump over the...more

George Washington University Law School Professor Jonathan Turley, the only witness chosen by the Republicans, said the current evidence does not adequately support the Democrats' allegations against Trump. Still, Turley admonished Trump over the call to Zelenskiy - disagreeing with Trump that the conversation was "perfect" - and said leveraging U.S. military aid to investigate a political opponent "if proven, can be an impeachable offense." REUTERS/Mike Segar
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Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) questions a panel of constitutional experts. Saul Loeb/Pool via REUTERS

Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) questions a panel of constitutional experts. Saul Loeb/Pool via REUTERS

Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) questions a panel of constitutional experts. Saul Loeb/Pool via REUTERS
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Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-CA) listens as constitutional scholars testify. Drew Angerer/Pool via REUTERS

Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-CA) listens as constitutional scholars testify. Drew Angerer/Pool via REUTERS

Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-CA) listens as constitutional scholars testify. Drew Angerer/Pool via REUTERS
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Representative Sheila Jackson Lee holds up copies of the Mueller Report as she questions constitutional scholars. Saul Loeb/Pool via REUTERS

Representative Sheila Jackson Lee holds up copies of the Mueller Report as she questions constitutional scholars. Saul Loeb/Pool via REUTERS

Representative Sheila Jackson Lee holds up copies of the Mueller Report as she questions constitutional scholars. Saul Loeb/Pool via REUTERS
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Republican House members Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX), Rep. Mike Johnson (R-LA), Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH), Rep. Andy Biggs (R-AZ) and Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) confer during a break. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Republican House members Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX), Rep. Mike Johnson (R-LA), Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH), Rep. Andy Biggs (R-AZ) and Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) confer during a break. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Republican House members Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX), Rep. Mike Johnson (R-LA), Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH), Rep. Andy Biggs (R-AZ) and Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) confer during a break. REUTERS/Tom Brenner
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Pamela Karlan is seated during a break. REUTERS/Loren Elliott

Pamela Karlan is seated during a break. REUTERS/Loren Elliott

Pamela Karlan is seated during a break. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
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Committee ranking member Representative Doug Collins (R-GA) listens as constitutional scholars testify. Drew Angerer/Pool via REUTERS

Committee ranking member Representative Doug Collins (R-GA) listens as constitutional scholars testify. Drew Angerer/Pool via REUTERS

Committee ranking member Representative Doug Collins (R-GA) listens as constitutional scholars testify. Drew Angerer/Pool via REUTERS
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Members of the audience stand awaiting the start of a House Judiciary Committee hearing. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Members of the audience stand awaiting the start of a House Judiciary Committee hearing. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Members of the audience stand awaiting the start of a House Judiciary Committee hearing. REUTERS/Tom Brenner
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Witnesses Noah Feldman, Pamela Karlan, Michael Gerhardt and Jonathan Turley appear to testify. REUTERS/Loren Elliott

Witnesses Noah Feldman, Pamela Karlan, Michael Gerhardt and Jonathan Turley appear to testify. REUTERS/Loren Elliott

Witnesses Noah Feldman, Pamela Karlan, Michael Gerhardt and Jonathan Turley appear to testify. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
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Ranking member Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA) delivers a statement. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Ranking member Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA) delivers a statement. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Ranking member Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA) delivers a statement. REUTERS/Mike Segar
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Pamela Karlan, professor of Public Interest Law and co-director of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic at Stanford Law School, listens to Noah Feldman, professor of law and director of the Julis-Rabinowitz Program on Jewish and Israeli Law at Harvard Law School, as he testifies. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Pamela Karlan, professor of Public Interest Law and co-director of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic at Stanford Law School, listens to Noah Feldman, professor of law and director of the Julis-Rabinowitz Program on Jewish and Israeli Law at Harvard...more

Pamela Karlan, professor of Public Interest Law and co-director of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic at Stanford Law School, listens to Noah Feldman, professor of law and director of the Julis-Rabinowitz Program on Jewish and Israeli Law at Harvard Law School, as he testifies. REUTERS/Tom Brenner
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Ranking member Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA) shakes hands with Democratic member of the committee Jamie Raskin (D-MD) prior to the hearing. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Ranking member Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA) shakes hands with Democratic member of the committee Jamie Raskin (D-MD) prior to the hearing. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Ranking member Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA) shakes hands with Democratic member of the committee Jamie Raskin (D-MD) prior to the hearing. REUTERS/Mike Segar
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Witness Jonathan Turley, a professor of law at George Washington University Law School, takes his papers from his briefcase as he prepares to testify. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Witness Jonathan Turley, a professor of law at George Washington University Law School, takes his papers from his briefcase as he prepares to testify. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Witness Jonathan Turley, a professor of law at George Washington University Law School, takes his papers from his briefcase as he prepares to testify. REUTERS/Tom Brenner
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A staff member wheels a cart full of documents into the committee room. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

A staff member wheels a cart full of documents into the committee room. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

A staff member wheels a cart full of documents into the committee room. REUTERS/Tom Brenner
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Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) arrives for the start of the hearing. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) arrives for the start of the hearing. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) arrives for the start of the hearing. REUTERS/Tom Brenner
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Members of the House Judiciary Committee are reflected in a television monitor as they begin their first hearing on the impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., December 4, 2019. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Members of the House Judiciary Committee are reflected in a television monitor as they begin their first hearing on the impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., December 4, 2019. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Members of the House Judiciary Committee are reflected in a television monitor as they begin their first hearing on the impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., December 4, 2019. REUTERS/Tom Brenner
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House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-NY) takes his seat beside Republican ranking member Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA). REUTERS/Mike Segar

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-NY) takes his seat beside Republican ranking member Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA). REUTERS/Mike Segar

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-NY) takes his seat beside Republican ranking member Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA). REUTERS/Mike Segar
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U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) smiles as he sits beside U.S. Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner (R-WI) in front of Rep. Mike Johnson (R-LA) during the first House Judiciary Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., December 4, 2019. REUTERS/Mike Segar

U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) smiles as he sits beside U.S. Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner (R-WI) in front of Rep. Mike Johnson (R-LA) during the first House Judiciary Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Donald Trump on Capitol...more

U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) smiles as he sits beside U.S. Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner (R-WI) in front of Rep. Mike Johnson (R-LA) during the first House Judiciary Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., December 4, 2019. REUTERS/Mike Segar
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House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) speaks. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) speaks. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) speaks. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Signs with quotes from Democratic members of Congress sit behind Republican seats. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Signs with quotes from Democratic members of Congress sit behind Republican seats. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Signs with quotes from Democratic members of Congress sit behind Republican seats. REUTERS/Mike Segar
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Witnesses Noah Feldman, a professor of law at Harvard University Law School, Pamela Karlan, co-director of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic at Stanford University Law School, Michael Gerhardt, professor of law at University of North Carolina School of Law and Jonathan Turley, professor of law at George Washington University Law School are sworn in to testify. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Witnesses Noah Feldman, a professor of law at Harvard University Law School, Pamela Karlan, co-director of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic at Stanford University Law School, Michael Gerhardt, professor of law at University of North Carolina...more

Witnesses Noah Feldman, a professor of law at Harvard University Law School, Pamela Karlan, co-director of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic at Stanford University Law School, Michael Gerhardt, professor of law at University of North Carolina School of Law and Jonathan Turley, professor of law at George Washington University Law School are sworn in to testify. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Attendee gather in the audience. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Attendee gather in the audience. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Attendee gather in the audience. REUTERS/Tom Brenner
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Members of the news media line up outside of the hearing room. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Members of the news media line up outside of the hearing room. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Members of the news media line up outside of the hearing room. REUTERS/Tom Brenner
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A U.S. Capitol police officer watches from the back wall of the hearing room as the House Judiciary Committee holds their first hearing on the impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., December 4, 2019. REUTERS/Tom Brenner     TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

A U.S. Capitol police officer watches from the back wall of the hearing room as the House Judiciary Committee holds their first hearing on the impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., December 4, 2019....more

A U.S. Capitol police officer watches from the back wall of the hearing room as the House Judiciary Committee holds their first hearing on the impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., December 4, 2019. REUTERS/Tom Brenner TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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The U.S. Capitol building is seen before the hearing. REUTERS/Loren Elliott

The U.S. Capitol building is seen before the hearing. REUTERS/Loren Elliott

The U.S. Capitol building is seen before the hearing. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
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The Washington Monument is seen during morning sunrise. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

The Washington Monument is seen during morning sunrise. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

The Washington Monument is seen during morning sunrise. REUTERS/Tom Brenner
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U.S. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) swears-in the witnesses during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on the impeachment of U.S. President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, December 4, 2019. Saul Loeb/Pool via REUTERS

U.S. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) swears-in the witnesses during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on the impeachment of U.S. President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, December 4, 2019. Saul Loeb/Pool via...more

U.S. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) swears-in the witnesses during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on the impeachment of U.S. President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, December 4, 2019. Saul Loeb/Pool via REUTERS
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