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Pictures | Thu May 28, 2020 | 5:09pm BST

Looking in, looking out on the world while under lockdown

Adetona Omokanye, a 29-year-old documentary photographer, takes pictures from the window of his home in Lekki, Lagos, Nigeria May 24, 2020. When asked what will he missed most about being in lockdown, Adetona replied: "I think I will definitely miss the fact that during the lockdown, it has been a great time for me to get time to breathe, to re-evaluate how I've been living my life and trying to focus more on the things that truly matter to me and that makes me happy." REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja

Adetona Omokanye, a 29-year-old documentary photographer, takes pictures from the window of his home in Lekki, Lagos, Nigeria May 24, 2020. When asked what will he missed most about being in lockdown, Adetona replied: "I think I will definitely miss...more

Adetona Omokanye, a 29-year-old documentary photographer, takes pictures from the window of his home in Lekki, Lagos, Nigeria May 24, 2020. When asked what will he missed most about being in lockdown, Adetona replied: "I think I will definitely miss the fact that during the lockdown, it has been a great time for me to get time to breathe, to re-evaluate how I've been living my life and trying to focus more on the things that truly matter to me and that makes me happy." REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja
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A view is pictured from the window of Adetona Omokanye's' home in Lekki, Lagos, Nigeria May 24, 2020. REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja

A view is pictured from the window of Adetona Omokanye's' home in Lekki, Lagos, Nigeria May 24, 2020. REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja

A view is pictured from the window of Adetona Omokanye's' home in Lekki, Lagos, Nigeria May 24, 2020. REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja
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Abu Ghazl, a 53-year-old internally displaced man, sits inside his tent at a makeshift camp erected in a cemetery in Maarat Misrin, an opposition-held northern Idlib town, Syria: "I won't miss anything after the lockdown because our situation will remain the same. Send us back to our home and we will self-quarantine there as much as you want." REUTERS/Khalil Ashawi

Abu Ghazl, a 53-year-old internally displaced man, sits inside his tent at a makeshift camp erected in a cemetery in Maarat Misrin, an opposition-held northern Idlib town, Syria: "I won't miss anything after the lockdown because our situation will...more

Abu Ghazl, a 53-year-old internally displaced man, sits inside his tent at a makeshift camp erected in a cemetery in Maarat Misrin, an opposition-held northern Idlib town, Syria: "I won't miss anything after the lockdown because our situation will remain the same. Send us back to our home and we will self-quarantine there as much as you want." REUTERS/Khalil Ashawi
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Graves are seen from the tent of Abu Ghazl, a 53-year-old internally displaced man, at a makeshift camp erected in a cemetery in Maarat Misrin, an opposition-held northern Idlib town, Syria, May 22, 2020. REUTERS/Khalil Ashawi

Graves are seen from the tent of Abu Ghazl, a 53-year-old internally displaced man, at a makeshift camp erected in a cemetery in Maarat Misrin, an opposition-held northern Idlib town, Syria, May 22, 2020. REUTERS/Khalil Ashawi

Graves are seen from the tent of Abu Ghazl, a 53-year-old internally displaced man, at a makeshift camp erected in a cemetery in Maarat Misrin, an opposition-held northern Idlib town, Syria, May 22, 2020. REUTERS/Khalil Ashawi
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Alexander Caiafas, a 25-year-old data analyst, in Ikoyi, Lagos, Nigeria: "Spending quality time with relatives and parents because you know, that's often hard to do. Secondly, I would say I miss speaking over the phone to close friends like on FaceTime, HouseParty, Zoom, all those kinds of applications." REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja

Alexander Caiafas, a 25-year-old data analyst, in Ikoyi, Lagos, Nigeria: "Spending quality time with relatives and parents because you know, that's often hard to do. Secondly, I would say I miss speaking over the phone to close friends like on...more

Alexander Caiafas, a 25-year-old data analyst, in Ikoyi, Lagos, Nigeria: "Spending quality time with relatives and parents because you know, that's often hard to do. Secondly, I would say I miss speaking over the phone to close friends like on FaceTime, HouseParty, Zoom, all those kinds of applications." REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja
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A view from the balcony of Alexander Caiafas' home in Ikoyi, Lagos, Nigeria May 25, 2020. REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja

A view from the balcony of Alexander Caiafas' home in Ikoyi, Lagos, Nigeria May 25, 2020. REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja

A view from the balcony of Alexander Caiafas' home in Ikoyi, Lagos, Nigeria May 25, 2020. REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja
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Businesswoman Mable Selina Etambo 39, in her mud-walled house in Kibera slums, Kenya: "I will miss my space because we are a very social society. COVID has made me realize that I need time to sit alone, reflect and plan my life without people bothering me." REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya

Businesswoman Mable Selina Etambo 39, in her mud-walled house in Kibera slums, Kenya: "I will miss my space because we are a very social society. COVID has made me realize that I need time to sit alone, reflect and plan my life without people...more

Businesswoman Mable Selina Etambo 39, in her mud-walled house in Kibera slums, Kenya: "I will miss my space because we are a very social society. COVID has made me realize that I need time to sit alone, reflect and plan my life without people bothering me." REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya
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A mud-wall shack is seen through the window of businesswoman Mable Selina Etambo's house, in Kibera slums, Kenya May 25, 2020. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya

A mud-wall shack is seen through the window of businesswoman Mable Selina Etambo's house, in Kibera slums, Kenya May 25, 2020. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya

A mud-wall shack is seen through the window of businesswoman Mable Selina Etambo's house, in Kibera slums, Kenya May 25, 2020. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya
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Yael Ben Ezer, a dancer from Israel's Batsheva Dance Company, practices in her apartment in Tel Aviv, Israel: "I will miss the comfortable feeling of it's OK. It's OK not to 'do' anything, it's ok not to be 'productive' in the way we usually think. Things would come and go, the sun would rise and set, and I would just be living. And that's totally enough." REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun

Yael Ben Ezer, a dancer from Israel's Batsheva Dance Company, practices in her apartment in Tel Aviv, Israel: "I will miss the comfortable feeling of it's OK. It's OK not to 'do' anything, it's ok not to be 'productive' in the way we usually think....more

Yael Ben Ezer, a dancer from Israel's Batsheva Dance Company, practices in her apartment in Tel Aviv, Israel: "I will miss the comfortable feeling of it's OK. It's OK not to 'do' anything, it's ok not to be 'productive' in the way we usually think. Things would come and go, the sun would rise and set, and I would just be living. And that's totally enough." REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
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Yael Ben Ezer, a dancer from Israel's Batsheva Dance Company, takes a photograph of the view she sees while lying on her bed after practicing in her apartment in Tel Aviv, Israel May 19, 2020. Yael Ben Ezer/Handout/via REUTERS

Yael Ben Ezer, a dancer from Israel's Batsheva Dance Company, takes a photograph of the view she sees while lying on her bed after practicing in her apartment in Tel Aviv, Israel May 19, 2020. Yael Ben Ezer/Handout/via REUTERS

Yael Ben Ezer, a dancer from Israel's Batsheva Dance Company, takes a photograph of the view she sees while lying on her bed after practicing in her apartment in Tel Aviv, Israel May 19, 2020. Yael Ben Ezer/Handout/via REUTERS
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Zodidi Desewula, a housewife from the Eastern Cape province, reads in her one-roomed rondavel house at the Sibanye Stillwater's women's hostel in Carletonville, South Africa. Zodidi says there is nothing she will miss about the lockdown once it is over. To her it was torture because she and her husband were stuck in one place unable to move. "My self and my husband were stuck in this single room house unable to go to work. We were struggling in getting food to eat because there was no income," she said. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

Zodidi Desewula, a housewife from the Eastern Cape province, reads in her one-roomed rondavel house at the Sibanye Stillwater's women's hostel in Carletonville, South Africa. Zodidi says there is nothing she will miss about the lockdown once it is...more

Zodidi Desewula, a housewife from the Eastern Cape province, reads in her one-roomed rondavel house at the Sibanye Stillwater's women's hostel in Carletonville, South Africa. Zodidi says there is nothing she will miss about the lockdown once it is over. To her it was torture because she and her husband were stuck in one place unable to move. "My self and my husband were stuck in this single room house unable to go to work. We were struggling in getting food to eat because there was no income," she said. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko
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A view is pictured from Zodidi Desewula's one-roomed rondavel house at the Sibanye Stillwater's women's hostel in Carletonville, South Africa, May 24, 2020. Zodidi Desewula/Handout/via REUTERS

A view is pictured from Zodidi Desewula's one-roomed rondavel house at the Sibanye Stillwater's women's hostel in Carletonville, South Africa, May 24, 2020. Zodidi Desewula/Handout/via REUTERS

A view is pictured from Zodidi Desewula's one-roomed rondavel house at the Sibanye Stillwater's women's hostel in Carletonville, South Africa, May 24, 2020. Zodidi Desewula/Handout/via REUTERS
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Lama Nadra, 28, reads a book near the balcony door at home in Tyre, southern Lebanon: "I will miss the family gathering; my brother will go back to Dubai and I will go back to Beirut. I will be separated from my father and mother too." REUTERS/Ali Hashisho

Lama Nadra, 28, reads a book near the balcony door at home in Tyre, southern Lebanon: "I will miss the family gathering; my brother will go back to Dubai and I will go back to Beirut. I will be separated from my father and mother too." REUTERS/Ali...more

Lama Nadra, 28, reads a book near the balcony door at home in Tyre, southern Lebanon: "I will miss the family gathering; my brother will go back to Dubai and I will go back to Beirut. I will be separated from my father and mother too." REUTERS/Ali Hashisho
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A view of inside Lama Nadra's home in Tyre, southern Lebanon May 18, 2020. REUTERS/Ali Hashisho

A view of inside Lama Nadra's home in Tyre, southern Lebanon May 18, 2020. REUTERS/Ali Hashisho

A view of inside Lama Nadra's home in Tyre, southern Lebanon May 18, 2020. REUTERS/Ali Hashisho
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Mohsin Rakha Al-meamar, 20, exercises at home after gyms were closed in the holy city of Karbala, Iraq: "What I will miss is time gained because going to the gym takes more time than exercising at home." REUTERS/Abdullah Dhiaa Al-deen

Mohsin Rakha Al-meamar, 20, exercises at home after gyms were closed in the holy city of Karbala, Iraq: "What I will miss is time gained because going to the gym takes more time than exercising at home." REUTERS/Abdullah Dhiaa Al-deen

Mohsin Rakha Al-meamar, 20, exercises at home after gyms were closed in the holy city of Karbala, Iraq: "What I will miss is time gained because going to the gym takes more time than exercising at home." REUTERS/Abdullah Dhiaa Al-deen
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Mohsin Rakha Al-meamar is reflected in the window of his home in the holy city of Karbala, Iraq, April 21, 2020. REUTERS/Abdullah Dhiaa Al-deen

Mohsin Rakha Al-meamar is reflected in the window of his home in the holy city of Karbala, Iraq, April 21, 2020. REUTERS/Abdullah Dhiaa Al-deen

Mohsin Rakha Al-meamar is reflected in the window of his home in the holy city of Karbala, Iraq, April 21, 2020. REUTERS/Abdullah Dhiaa Al-deen
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Zineb Mohamed "Om Hany", a 59-year-old concierge, watches television in Cairo, Egypt: " I will miss life being quiet, especially at night." REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh

Zineb Mohamed "Om Hany", a 59-year-old concierge, watches television in Cairo, Egypt: " I will miss life being quiet, especially at night." REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh

Zineb Mohamed "Om Hany", a 59-year-old concierge, watches television in Cairo, Egypt: " I will miss life being quiet, especially at night." REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
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A view is seen from the doorway of Zineb Mohamed "Om Hany" in Cairo, Egypt May 15, 2020. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh

A view is seen from the doorway of Zineb Mohamed "Om Hany" in Cairo, Egypt May 15, 2020. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh

A view is seen from the doorway of Zineb Mohamed "Om Hany" in Cairo, Egypt May 15, 2020. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
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Jordanian brothers Hussein and Zeyad Ashish, boxers who qualified for the Tokyo Olympics, engage in an online boxing training as seen through a window into the roof of their home at Al-Baqaa Palestinian refugee camp, near Amman, Jordan, May 14, 2020. Hussein said: "I will miss this place where I spent wonderful time training. I will miss beautiful memories spent here after the lockdown." REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed

Jordanian brothers Hussein and Zeyad Ashish, boxers who qualified for the Tokyo Olympics, engage in an online boxing training as seen through a window into the roof of their home at Al-Baqaa Palestinian refugee camp, near Amman, Jordan, May 14, 2020....more

Jordanian brothers Hussein and Zeyad Ashish, boxers who qualified for the Tokyo Olympics, engage in an online boxing training as seen through a window into the roof of their home at Al-Baqaa Palestinian refugee camp, near Amman, Jordan, May 14, 2020. Hussein said: "I will miss this place where I spent wonderful time training. I will miss beautiful memories spent here after the lockdown." REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed
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A view of Al-Baqaa camp as seen from a roof window where Jordanian brothers and boxers Hussein and Zeyad Ashish train at Al-Baqaa Palestinian refugee camp, near Amman, Jordan, May 14, 2020. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed

A view of Al-Baqaa camp as seen from a roof window where Jordanian brothers and boxers Hussein and Zeyad Ashish train at Al-Baqaa Palestinian refugee camp, near Amman, Jordan, May 14, 2020. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed

A view of Al-Baqaa camp as seen from a roof window where Jordanian brothers and boxers Hussein and Zeyad Ashish train at Al-Baqaa Palestinian refugee camp, near Amman, Jordan, May 14, 2020. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed
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Domestic worker Alphonia Zali in Langa township near Cape Town, South Africa: " I won't miss anything about the lockdown. I know the lockdown is good for us, but to stay inside is difficult. You can't shop, see friends, or go to work." REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

Domestic worker Alphonia Zali in Langa township near Cape Town, South Africa: " I won't miss anything about the lockdown. I know the lockdown is good for us, but to stay inside is difficult. You can't shop, see friends, or go to work." REUTERS/Mike...more

Domestic worker Alphonia Zali in Langa township near Cape Town, South Africa: " I won't miss anything about the lockdown. I know the lockdown is good for us, but to stay inside is difficult. You can't shop, see friends, or go to work." REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
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Shacks are seen through the doorway of domestic worker Alphonia Zali's two-room apartment in Langa township near Cape Town, South Africa, May 7, 2020. Mphakamisi Zali/Handout via REUTERS

Shacks are seen through the doorway of domestic worker Alphonia Zali's two-room apartment in Langa township near Cape Town, South Africa, May 7, 2020. Mphakamisi Zali/Handout via REUTERS

Shacks are seen through the doorway of domestic worker Alphonia Zali's two-room apartment in Langa township near Cape Town, South Africa, May 7, 2020. Mphakamisi Zali/Handout via REUTERS
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Nada Maged, a 20-year-old a student at the faculty of Arts and Design in MSA University, works on a stop motion video project at home in Cairo, Egypt: "I will miss spending time quality with my family and will miss the feeling that I have more free time which is sometime I have dreamed of." REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh

Nada Maged, a 20-year-old a student at the faculty of Arts and Design in MSA University, works on a stop motion video project at home in Cairo, Egypt: "I will miss spending time quality with my family and will miss the feeling that I have more free...more

Nada Maged, a 20-year-old a student at the faculty of Arts and Design in MSA University, works on a stop motion video project at home in Cairo, Egypt: "I will miss spending time quality with my family and will miss the feeling that I have more free time which is sometime I have dreamed of." REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
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A view from the balcony of student Nada Maged in Cairo, Egypt May 14, 2020. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh

A view from the balcony of student Nada Maged in Cairo, Egypt May 14, 2020. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh

A view from the balcony of student Nada Maged in Cairo, Egypt May 14, 2020. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
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Bruno Ngetich, 10, swings inside a building in the Mathare slums of Nairobi, Kenya: "I will not miss anything once the curfew is over. I miss going to school and playing outside." REUTERS/Baz Ratner

Bruno Ngetich, 10, swings inside a building in the Mathare slums of Nairobi, Kenya: "I will not miss anything once the curfew is over. I miss going to school and playing outside." REUTERS/Baz Ratner

Bruno Ngetich, 10, swings inside a building in the Mathare slums of Nairobi, Kenya: "I will not miss anything once the curfew is over. I miss going to school and playing outside." REUTERS/Baz Ratner
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A swing hangs inside a building in the Mathare slums of Nairobi, Kenya, May 20, 2020. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

A swing hangs inside a building in the Mathare slums of Nairobi, Kenya, May 20, 2020. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

A swing hangs inside a building in the Mathare slums of Nairobi, Kenya, May 20, 2020. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
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Palestinian boy Belal Daraghma, 3, looks out from his family apartment in Tubas, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank. "He spends much of his time sitting on the window playing with his toys and looking outside as he gets bored from the home confinement due to the coronavirus," said Belal's mother. REUTERS/Raneen Sawafta

Palestinian boy Belal Daraghma, 3, looks out from his family apartment in Tubas, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank. "He spends much of his time sitting on the window playing with his toys and looking outside as he gets bored from the home confinement...more

Palestinian boy Belal Daraghma, 3, looks out from his family apartment in Tubas, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank. "He spends much of his time sitting on the window playing with his toys and looking outside as he gets bored from the home confinement due to the coronavirus," said Belal's mother. REUTERS/Raneen Sawafta
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Houses are seen through the window of the family apartment of Palestinian boy Belal Daraghma, 3, in Tubas, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank April 16, 2020. REUTERS/Raneen Sawafta

Houses are seen through the window of the family apartment of Palestinian boy Belal Daraghma, 3, in Tubas, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank April 16, 2020. REUTERS/Raneen Sawafta

Houses are seen through the window of the family apartment of Palestinian boy Belal Daraghma, 3, in Tubas, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank April 16, 2020. REUTERS/Raneen Sawafta
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