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Pictures | Thu Jun 27, 2019 | 1:40am BST

Mexico deploys forces in the north to halt U.S.-bound migration

A member of Mexico's National Guard plays with a Honduran girl after she was stopped along with her mother and sister from crossing illegally into El Paso, Texas, United States, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 26, 2019. Mexico has deployed almost 15,000 soldiers and National Guard in the north of the country to stem the flow of illegal immigration across the border into the United States, the head of the Mexican Army said on Monday. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

A member of Mexico's National Guard plays with a Honduran girl after she was stopped along with her mother and sister from crossing illegally into El Paso, Texas, United States, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 26, 2019. Mexico has deployed almost...more

A member of Mexico's National Guard plays with a Honduran girl after she was stopped along with her mother and sister from crossing illegally into El Paso, Texas, United States, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 26, 2019. Mexico has deployed almost 15,000 soldiers and National Guard in the north of the country to stem the flow of illegal immigration across the border into the United States, the head of the Mexican Army said on Monday. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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Members of Mexico's National Guard patrol the border between Mexico and the U.S. as part of an ongoing operation to prevent migrants from crossing illegally into the United States, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 26. Mexico has not traditionally used security forces to stop undocumented foreign citizens leaving the country for the United States, and photographs of militarized police catching Central American and Cuban women at the border in recent days have met with criticism. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

Members of Mexico's National Guard patrol the border between Mexico and the U.S. as part of an ongoing operation to prevent migrants from crossing illegally into the United States, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 26. Mexico has not traditionally used...more

Members of Mexico's National Guard patrol the border between Mexico and the U.S. as part of an ongoing operation to prevent migrants from crossing illegally into the United States, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 26. Mexico has not traditionally used security forces to stop undocumented foreign citizens leaving the country for the United States, and photographs of militarized police catching Central American and Cuban women at the border in recent days have met with criticism. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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Migrants from Guatemala listen to an officer of the National Migration Institute after they were stopped from crossing illegally into El Paso, Texas, United States, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 26. Mexico is trying to curb a surge of migrants from third countries crossing its territory in order to reach the United States, under the threat of tariffs on its exports by U.S. President Donald Trump, who has made tightening border security a priority. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

Migrants from Guatemala listen to an officer of the National Migration Institute after they were stopped from crossing illegally into El Paso, Texas, United States, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 26. Mexico is trying to curb a surge of migrants from...more

Migrants from Guatemala listen to an officer of the National Migration Institute after they were stopped from crossing illegally into El Paso, Texas, United States, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 26. Mexico is trying to curb a surge of migrants from third countries crossing its territory in order to reach the United States, under the threat of tariffs on its exports by U.S. President Donald Trump, who has made tightening border security a priority. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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Members of Mexico's National Guard stand under the Paso del Norte International bridge that connects the U.S. and Mexico, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 24. Responding to weekend reports of heavy-handed interventions by the military, Luis Cresencio Sandoval, the head of the Army, said soldiers were needed to back up migration officials in containment operations. Alongside 6,500 members of the security forces sent to Mexico's southern border area with Guatemala, where many migrants enter, a larger contingent was in the north, he said.

REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

Members of Mexico's National Guard stand under the Paso del Norte International bridge that connects the U.S. and Mexico, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 24. Responding to weekend reports of heavy-handed interventions by the military, Luis Cresencio...more

Members of Mexico's National Guard stand under the Paso del Norte International bridge that connects the U.S. and Mexico, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 24. Responding to weekend reports of heavy-handed interventions by the military, Luis Cresencio Sandoval, the head of the Army, said soldiers were needed to back up migration officials in containment operations. Alongside 6,500 members of the security forces sent to Mexico's southern border area with Guatemala, where many migrants enter, a larger contingent was in the north, he said. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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A young girl from Nicaragua reacts as a member of Mexico's National Guard looks at papers after detaining her, her mother and another woman, while they tried to illegally cross the U.S.-Mexico border in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 21.  "In the northern part of the country we have a total deployment of 14,000, almost 15,000 units between the National Guard and the Army," Sandoval told a regular news conference. "If we left it completely in the hands of the National Institute of Migration it wouldn't be possible," he added. "That's why we're providing support, it's a strategy being pursued on both borders."

REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

A young girl from Nicaragua reacts as a member of Mexico's National Guard looks at papers after detaining her, her mother and another woman, while they tried to illegally cross the U.S.-Mexico border in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 21. "In the...more

A young girl from Nicaragua reacts as a member of Mexico's National Guard looks at papers after detaining her, her mother and another woman, while they tried to illegally cross the U.S.-Mexico border in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 21. "In the northern part of the country we have a total deployment of 14,000, almost 15,000 units between the National Guard and the Army," Sandoval told a regular news conference. "If we left it completely in the hands of the National Institute of Migration it wouldn't be possible," he added. "That's why we're providing support, it's a strategy being pursued on both borders." REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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Members of Mexico's National Guard escort two women and a young girl from Nicaragua after they were detained while trying to cross illegally the border between the U.S. and Mexico, in Ciudad Juarez, June 21. Former Mexican national security official Gustavo Mohar said Mexico's security forces had not been used this way before, describing the development as "sad." Mohar blamed the change on Trump's threats to impose tariffs. The National Guard should ideally not be implementing migration policy, he argued, while acknowledging that Mexican migration authorities were overwhelmed.

REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

Members of Mexico's National Guard escort two women and a young girl from Nicaragua after they were detained while trying to cross illegally the border between the U.S. and Mexico, in Ciudad Juarez, June 21. Former Mexican national security official...more

Members of Mexico's National Guard escort two women and a young girl from Nicaragua after they were detained while trying to cross illegally the border between the U.S. and Mexico, in Ciudad Juarez, June 21. Former Mexican national security official Gustavo Mohar said Mexico's security forces had not been used this way before, describing the development as "sad." Mohar blamed the change on Trump's threats to impose tariffs. The National Guard should ideally not be implementing migration policy, he argued, while acknowledging that Mexican migration authorities were overwhelmed. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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Members of Mexico's National Guard patrol the border between Mexico and the U.S. in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 24. A new militarized police force formed from soldiers, marines and federal police, the National Guard is at the heart of Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador's plan to restore order in a country convulsed by record levels of violence. The force is still taking shape, and due to be headed by a retired general under the aegis of the security ministry.

REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

Members of Mexico's National Guard patrol the border between Mexico and the U.S. in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 24. A new militarized police force formed from soldiers, marines and federal police, the National Guard is at the heart of Mexican...more

Members of Mexico's National Guard patrol the border between Mexico and the U.S. in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico June 24. A new militarized police force formed from soldiers, marines and federal police, the National Guard is at the heart of Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador's plan to restore order in a country convulsed by record levels of violence. The force is still taking shape, and due to be headed by a retired general under the aegis of the security ministry. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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Members of Mexico's National Guard detain Cuban migrants after they were trying to cross illegally the border between the U.S. and Mexico, in Ciudad Juarez, June 21. Mexico on June 7 agreed to reduce significantly the number of migrants reaching the U.S. border within a period of 45 days. If that fails, Lopez Obrador's government has said it will consider changing its laws to satisfy Trump's demand that Mexico become a buffer zone to stop migrants entering the United States.


REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

Members of Mexico's National Guard detain Cuban migrants after they were trying to cross illegally the border between the U.S. and Mexico, in Ciudad Juarez, June 21. Mexico on June 7 agreed to reduce significantly the number of migrants reaching the...more

Members of Mexico's National Guard detain Cuban migrants after they were trying to cross illegally the border between the U.S. and Mexico, in Ciudad Juarez, June 21. Mexico on June 7 agreed to reduce significantly the number of migrants reaching the U.S. border within a period of 45 days. If that fails, Lopez Obrador's government has said it will consider changing its laws to satisfy Trump's demand that Mexico become a buffer zone to stop migrants entering the United States. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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A member of Mexico's National Guard and a Federal Police officer stand guard near the U.S.-Mexico border in Ciudad Juarez, June 24. Most of the people caught on the U.S.-Mexico border are from three Central American countries suffering from high levels of gang violence and poverty: Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador.

REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

A member of Mexico's National Guard and a Federal Police officer stand guard near the U.S.-Mexico border in Ciudad Juarez, June 24. Most of the people caught on the U.S.-Mexico border are from three Central American countries suffering from high...more

A member of Mexico's National Guard and a Federal Police officer stand guard near the U.S.-Mexico border in Ciudad Juarez, June 24. Most of the people caught on the U.S.-Mexico border are from three Central American countries suffering from high levels of gang violence and poverty: Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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Members of Mexico's National Guard patrol the border between Mexico and the U.S. in Ciudad Juarez, June 24. Trump has said he will impose initial tariffs of 5% on all Mexican goods if the migrant flow is not curbed. The tariff could eventually rise as high as 25%, he has said. 

REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

Members of Mexico's National Guard patrol the border between Mexico and the U.S. in Ciudad Juarez, June 24. Trump has said he will impose initial tariffs of 5% on all Mexican goods if the migrant flow is not curbed. The tariff could eventually rise...more

Members of Mexico's National Guard patrol the border between Mexico and the U.S. in Ciudad Juarez, June 24. Trump has said he will impose initial tariffs of 5% on all Mexican goods if the migrant flow is not curbed. The tariff could eventually rise as high as 25%, he has said. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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A member of Mexico's National Guard watches a migrant from El Salvador after he was detained while trying to cross illegally the border between the U.S. and Mexico, in Ciudad Juarez, June 21. 
REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

A member of Mexico's National Guard watches a migrant from El Salvador after he was detained while trying to cross illegally the border between the U.S. and Mexico, in Ciudad Juarez, June 21. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

A member of Mexico's National Guard watches a migrant from El Salvador after he was detained while trying to cross illegally the border between the U.S. and Mexico, in Ciudad Juarez, June 21. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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Members of the National Guard look at migrants that crossed illegally into El Paso, Texas, as seen from Ciudad Juarez, June 19. 

REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

Members of the National Guard look at migrants that crossed illegally into El Paso, Texas, as seen from Ciudad Juarez, June 19. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

Members of the National Guard look at migrants that crossed illegally into El Paso, Texas, as seen from Ciudad Juarez, June 19. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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A member of Mexico's National Guard talks to women from Nicaragua after they were detained while trying to cross illegally the border between the U.S. and Mexico, in Ciudad Juarez, June 21. 

REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

A member of Mexico's National Guard talks to women from Nicaragua after they were detained while trying to cross illegally the border between the U.S. and Mexico, in Ciudad Juarez, June 21. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

A member of Mexico's National Guard talks to women from Nicaragua after they were detained while trying to cross illegally the border between the U.S. and Mexico, in Ciudad Juarez, June 21. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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A Mexican soldier keeps watch at the border in Ciudad Juarez, June 16. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

A Mexican soldier keeps watch at the border in Ciudad Juarez, June 16. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

A Mexican soldier keeps watch at the border in Ciudad Juarez, June 16. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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A Mexican soldier is seen atop a military vehicle during an operation in Ciudad Juarez, June 16. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

A Mexican soldier is seen atop a military vehicle during an operation in Ciudad Juarez, June 16. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

A Mexican soldier is seen atop a military vehicle during an operation in Ciudad Juarez, June 16. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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A member of Mexico's National Guard looks at people walking in El Paso, Texas after illegally crossing the border, as seen from Ciudad Juarez, June 21. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

A member of Mexico's National Guard looks at people walking in El Paso, Texas after illegally crossing the border, as seen from Ciudad Juarez, June 21. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

A member of Mexico's National Guard looks at people walking in El Paso, Texas after illegally crossing the border, as seen from Ciudad Juarez, June 21. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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A young girl from Nicaragua is comforted by her mother after they were detained by members of Mexico's National Guard while trying to illegally cross the U.S.-Mexico border in Ciudad Juarez, June 21. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

A young girl from Nicaragua is comforted by her mother after they were detained by members of Mexico's National Guard while trying to illegally cross the U.S.-Mexico border in Ciudad Juarez, June 21. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

A young girl from Nicaragua is comforted by her mother after they were detained by members of Mexico's National Guard while trying to illegally cross the U.S.-Mexico border in Ciudad Juarez, June 21. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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A Mexican soldier keeps watch at the border during an operation in Ciudad Juarez, June 16. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

A Mexican soldier keeps watch at the border during an operation in Ciudad Juarez, June 16. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

A Mexican soldier keeps watch at the border during an operation in Ciudad Juarez, June 16. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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