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Notable deaths in 2020

John Hume, the Roman Catholic architect of Northern Ireland's 1998 Good Friday peace agreement who won the Nobel Peace Prize for his role in ending 30 years of sectarian violence, died August 3 at the age of 83. A veteran civil rights campaigner credited with kick-starting peace negotiations in a British region convulsed by bloodshed in the early 1990s, Hume shared the Peace Prize with Northern Ireland's then-first minister, David Trimble of the Protestant Ulster Unionist Party. Hume in 1968 joined a movement to protect the civil rights of the province's pro-Irish Catholic minority, fighting against discrimination by the pro-British Protestant majority in everything from housing to education. As leader of the moderate Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), Hume was an important advocate of non-violence as fighting erupted between Irish nationalists who wanted a united Ireland and pro-British forces, including the British Army, who wanted to maintain the region's British status. In a pivotal breakthrough, Hume in 1993 took part in pioneering talks with Gerry Adams, who was at the time the leader of the Sinn Fein party that was then the political wing of the guerrilla Irish Republican Army (IRA). The talks helped pave the way for a joint initiative by the British and Irish governments in 1993 that spawned a peace process and an IRA truce in 1994 - and ultimately paved the way for the watershed Good Friday accord four years later.

REUTERS/Paul McErlane

John Hume, the Roman Catholic architect of Northern Ireland's 1998 Good Friday peace agreement who won the Nobel Peace Prize for his role in ending 30 years of sectarian violence, died August 3 at the age of 83. A veteran civil rights campaigner...more

John Hume, the Roman Catholic architect of Northern Ireland's 1998 Good Friday peace agreement who won the Nobel Peace Prize for his role in ending 30 years of sectarian violence, died August 3 at the age of 83. A veteran civil rights campaigner credited with kick-starting peace negotiations in a British region convulsed by bloodshed in the early 1990s, Hume shared the Peace Prize with Northern Ireland's then-first minister, David Trimble of the Protestant Ulster Unionist Party. Hume in 1968 joined a movement to protect the civil rights of the province's pro-Irish Catholic minority, fighting against discrimination by the pro-British Protestant majority in everything from housing to education. As leader of the moderate Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), Hume was an important advocate of non-violence as fighting erupted between Irish nationalists who wanted a united Ireland and pro-British forces, including the British Army, who wanted to maintain the region's British status. In a pivotal breakthrough, Hume in 1993 took part in pioneering talks with Gerry Adams, who was at the time the leader of the Sinn Fein party that was then the political wing of the guerrilla Irish Republican Army (IRA). The talks helped pave the way for a joint initiative by the British and Irish governments in 1993 that spawned a peace process and an IRA truce in 1994 - and ultimately paved the way for the watershed Good Friday accord four years later. REUTERS/Paul McErlane
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Former Taiwan President Lee Teng-hui, who died on July 30 aged 97, was dubbed "Mr. Democracy" for burying autocratic rule in favor of freewheeling pluralism, and thrived on defying China's drive to absorb an island it regards as a wayward province. Lee hoped for Taiwan to be "a country of democracy, freedom, human rights and dignity, where one does not have to be ruled by others and where everyone can say out loud 'I'm Taiwanese'," he told a 2012 election rally. Lee's greatest act of defiance was becoming Taiwan's first democratically elected president in March 1996, achieved with a landslide following eight months of intimidating war games and missile tests by China in waters around the island. The government of Taiwan, formally the Republic of China, was established in 1949 by Chiang Kai-shek, after his Nationalist forces lost control of the mainland to Mao Zedong's Communists and fled to the island, which lies some 112 miles across the Taiwan Strait off China's southeast coast. Lee became the Nationalist party chairman and Taiwan's president upon the 1988 death of Chiang's son, Chiang Ching-kuo. Eight years after assuming the role, Lee's push for full democracy culminated with the island's first direct presidential vote. The first president born on the island, Lee's tough language towards mainland China resonated with Taiwan's 23 million people. He once described Taiwan-China ties as a "special state-to-state relationship," infuriating Beijing. He also sought to snap cultural links in favor of a distinct Taiwanese identity.

REUTERS/Chris Pizzello

Former Taiwan President Lee Teng-hui, who died on July 30 aged 97, was dubbed "Mr. Democracy" for burying autocratic rule in favor of freewheeling pluralism, and thrived on defying China's drive to absorb an island it regards as a wayward province....more

Former Taiwan President Lee Teng-hui, who died on July 30 aged 97, was dubbed "Mr. Democracy" for burying autocratic rule in favor of freewheeling pluralism, and thrived on defying China's drive to absorb an island it regards as a wayward province. Lee hoped for Taiwan to be "a country of democracy, freedom, human rights and dignity, where one does not have to be ruled by others and where everyone can say out loud 'I'm Taiwanese'," he told a 2012 election rally. Lee's greatest act of defiance was becoming Taiwan's first democratically elected president in March 1996, achieved with a landslide following eight months of intimidating war games and missile tests by China in waters around the island. The government of Taiwan, formally the Republic of China, was established in 1949 by Chiang Kai-shek, after his Nationalist forces lost control of the mainland to Mao Zedong's Communists and fled to the island, which lies some 112 miles across the Taiwan Strait off China's southeast coast. Lee became the Nationalist party chairman and Taiwan's president upon the 1988 death of Chiang's son, Chiang Ching-kuo. Eight years after assuming the role, Lee's push for full democracy culminated with the island's first direct presidential vote. The first president born on the island, Lee's tough language towards mainland China resonated with Taiwan's 23 million people. He once described Taiwan-China ties as a "special state-to-state relationship," infuriating Beijing. He also sought to snap cultural links in favor of a distinct Taiwanese identity. REUTERS/Chris Pizzello
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Herman Cain, a television host and former Republican presidential candidate, died July 30 after contracting COVID-19. Cain, 74, was diagnosed in late June and later hospitalized after attending a Tulsa, Oklahoma, rally for President Donald Trump, where many attendees crowded close together without wearing face masks to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Cain, who called himself an ABC man - "American Black Conservative" - had just started hosting a new show on Newsmax TV and hoped to play a role in the 2020 presidential election campaign, the statement said. Cain started his career as a civilian employee for the U.S. Navy and worked for Pillsbury and Burger King before becoming chief executive of Godfather's Pizza. He made national headlines in 1994 when he sparred with then-President Bill Clinton about healthcare costs facing small business owners during a televised town hall meeting.

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Herman Cain, a television host and former Republican presidential candidate, died July 30 after contracting COVID-19. Cain, 74, was diagnosed in late June and later hospitalized after attending a Tulsa, Oklahoma, rally for President Donald Trump,...more

Herman Cain, a television host and former Republican presidential candidate, died July 30 after contracting COVID-19. Cain, 74, was diagnosed in late June and later hospitalized after attending a Tulsa, Oklahoma, rally for President Donald Trump, where many attendees crowded close together without wearing face masks to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Cain, who called himself an ABC man - "American Black Conservative" - had just started hosting a new show on Newsmax TV and hoped to play a role in the 2020 presidential election campaign, the statement said. Cain started his career as a civilian employee for the U.S. Navy and worked for Pillsbury and Burger King before becoming chief executive of Godfather's Pizza. He made national headlines in 1994 when he sparred with then-President Bill Clinton about healthcare costs facing small business owners during a televised town hall meeting. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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"Gone With the Wind" star Olivia de Havilland, considered the last surviving actress of the Golden Age of Hollywood, died July 26 at the age of 104. De Havilland's acting career included two Academy Awards, a victory over Hollywood's studio system and a long-running feud with sister Joan Fontaine that was worthy of a screenplay. She first drew attention by playing opposite swashbuckling Errol Flynn in a series of films starting in the 1930s and made an enduring impression as the demure Southern belle Melanie in "Gone With the Wind" in 1939. Later she would have to fight to get more challenging roles - a battle that ended up in court but paid off with Oscars for "To Each His Own" in 1946 and "The Heiress" in 1949.

REUTERS/Mike Blake

"Gone With the Wind" star Olivia de Havilland, considered the last surviving actress of the Golden Age of Hollywood, died July 26 at the age of 104. De Havilland's acting career included two Academy Awards, a victory over Hollywood's studio system...more

"Gone With the Wind" star Olivia de Havilland, considered the last surviving actress of the Golden Age of Hollywood, died July 26 at the age of 104. De Havilland's acting career included two Academy Awards, a victory over Hollywood's studio system and a long-running feud with sister Joan Fontaine that was worthy of a screenplay. She first drew attention by playing opposite swashbuckling Errol Flynn in a series of films starting in the 1930s and made an enduring impression as the demure Southern belle Melanie in "Gone With the Wind" in 1939. Later she would have to fight to get more challenging roles - a battle that ended up in court but paid off with Oscars for "To Each His Own" in 1946 and "The Heiress" in 1949. REUTERS/Mike Blake
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Regis Philbin, a familiar face to TV viewers as an energetic and funny talk and game show host who logged more hours in front of the camera than anyone else in the history of U.S. television, died July 24 at the age of 88. He was known for his rough edges, funny anecdotes, self-deprecating humor and a Bronx accent that was once described as sounding "like a racetrack announcer with a head cold." American comedian and late-night host David Letterman, a long-time friend, called Philbin the funniest man on television. Philbin - known to fans as "Reeg" - was a fixture on various local and national shows for a half century with co-hosts including Kathie Lee Gifford and Kelly Ripa, winning millions of fans as well as honors as the top U.S. talk and game show host. He hosted the successful "Who Wants to be a Millionaire" program when it debuted in the United States in 1999 as well as other game shows. Philbin signed a deal in 2000 making his salary for "Who Wants to be a Millionaire" $20 million a year, the most ever for a game show host. Guinness World Records listed him as having put in more time on camera than anyone else in the history of U.S. television - about 17,000 hours.

REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

Regis Philbin, a familiar face to TV viewers as an energetic and funny talk and game show host who logged more hours in front of the camera than anyone else in the history of U.S. television, died July 24 at the age of 88. He was known for his rough...more

Regis Philbin, a familiar face to TV viewers as an energetic and funny talk and game show host who logged more hours in front of the camera than anyone else in the history of U.S. television, died July 24 at the age of 88. He was known for his rough edges, funny anecdotes, self-deprecating humor and a Bronx accent that was once described as sounding "like a racetrack announcer with a head cold." American comedian and late-night host David Letterman, a long-time friend, called Philbin the funniest man on television. Philbin - known to fans as "Reeg" - was a fixture on various local and national shows for a half century with co-hosts including Kathie Lee Gifford and Kelly Ripa, winning millions of fans as well as honors as the top U.S. talk and game show host. He hosted the successful "Who Wants to be a Millionaire" program when it debuted in the United States in 1999 as well as other game shows. Philbin signed a deal in 2000 making his salary for "Who Wants to be a Millionaire" $20 million a year, the most ever for a game show host. Guinness World Records listed him as having put in more time on camera than anyone else in the history of U.S. television - about 17,000 hours. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
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South African anti-apartheid campaigner Andrew Mlangeni, who was jailed alongside Nelson Mandela in 1964 after a treason trial, died July 21 at the age of 95. Mlangeni spent 26 years in jail and was the last of the eight defendants in the trial to die. President Cyril Ramaphosa, who fought with Mlangeni for racial equality and an end to white minority rule, described him as a "beacon of ethical leadership and care for humanity" whose death marked the end of a generation of history and left the future in the hands of those who remained. In 1951, Mlangeni joined the youth wing of the African National Congress (ANC), and was later sent abroad for military training. On his return in 1963, he was arrested and stood trial alongside seven others including Mandela in what became known as the Rivonia trial. Mlangeni was sentenced to life imprisonment and sent with Mandela to Robben Island prison, the main jail used at the time for Black male anti-apartheid prisoners. After his release, he served as a member of parliament and lived in the township of Soweto, outside Johannesburg, until his death.

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

South African anti-apartheid campaigner Andrew Mlangeni, who was jailed alongside Nelson Mandela in 1964 after a treason trial, died July 21 at the age of 95. Mlangeni spent 26 years in jail and was the last of the eight defendants in the trial to...more

South African anti-apartheid campaigner Andrew Mlangeni, who was jailed alongside Nelson Mandela in 1964 after a treason trial, died July 21 at the age of 95. Mlangeni spent 26 years in jail and was the last of the eight defendants in the trial to die. President Cyril Ramaphosa, who fought with Mlangeni for racial equality and an end to white minority rule, described him as a "beacon of ethical leadership and care for humanity" whose death marked the end of a generation of history and left the future in the hands of those who remained. In 1951, Mlangeni joined the youth wing of the African National Congress (ANC), and was later sent abroad for military training. On his return in 1963, he was arrested and stood trial alongside seven others including Mandela in what became known as the Rivonia trial. Mlangeni was sentenced to life imprisonment and sent with Mandela to Robben Island prison, the main jail used at the time for Black male anti-apartheid prisoners. After his release, he served as a member of parliament and lived in the township of Soweto, outside Johannesburg, until his death. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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John Lewis, a pioneer of the civil rights movement and long-time member of the U.S. House of Representatives, died July 17. A Democratic member of Congress from Atlanta since 1987, Lewis had announced in December that he had advanced pancreatic cancer. He was 80. Lewis was a protege of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., whom he met after writing to him when Lewis was just 18. He was the last surviving speaker from the 1963 March on Washington, having stood beside King when he made his "I Have a Dream" speech. Lewis endured numerous beatings and arrests in his lifelong fight against segregation and for racial justice, including in Alabama, where he was savagely beaten during the "Bloody Sunday" march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in 1965. He kept up the fight for civil rights and human rights until the end of his life. In 2016, Lewis led a "sit-in" by House Democrats to demand a vote on gun regulations. He made his last public appearance last month, as protests for racial justice swept the United States and the world. Using a cane, Lewis walked with Washington Mayor Muriel Bowser on a street by the White House that Bowser had just renamed Black Lives Matter Plaza. It had just been dedicated with a large yellow mural - large enough to be seen from space - reading "Black Lives Matter."

REUTERS/Leah Millis

John Lewis, a pioneer of the civil rights movement and long-time member of the U.S. House of Representatives, died July 17. A Democratic member of Congress from Atlanta since 1987, Lewis had announced in December that he had advanced pancreatic...more

John Lewis, a pioneer of the civil rights movement and long-time member of the U.S. House of Representatives, died July 17. A Democratic member of Congress from Atlanta since 1987, Lewis had announced in December that he had advanced pancreatic cancer. He was 80. Lewis was a protege of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., whom he met after writing to him when Lewis was just 18. He was the last surviving speaker from the 1963 March on Washington, having stood beside King when he made his "I Have a Dream" speech. Lewis endured numerous beatings and arrests in his lifelong fight against segregation and for racial justice, including in Alabama, where he was savagely beaten during the "Bloody Sunday" march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in 1965. He kept up the fight for civil rights and human rights until the end of his life. In 2016, Lewis led a "sit-in" by House Democrats to demand a vote on gun regulations. He made his last public appearance last month, as protests for racial justice swept the United States and the world. Using a cane, Lewis walked with Washington Mayor Muriel Bowser on a street by the White House that Bowser had just renamed Black Lives Matter Plaza. It had just been dedicated with a large yellow mural - large enough to be seen from space - reading "Black Lives Matter." REUTERS/Leah Millis
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Russian figure skater Ekaterina Alexandrovskaya, who competed for Australia in the 2018 Winter Olympics, died July 17 at the age of 20. She reportedly retired from competitive skating in February after splitting from Australian partner Harley Windsor. The duo first began skating together in 2016, winning the world junior title in 2017. Alexandrovskaya was granted Australian citizenship so that the duo could skate together at the 2018 Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. They finished in 18th place.

Eric Bolte-USA TODAY Sports

Russian figure skater Ekaterina Alexandrovskaya, who competed for Australia in the 2018 Winter Olympics, died July 17 at the age of 20. She reportedly retired from competitive skating in February after splitting from Australian partner Harley...more

Russian figure skater Ekaterina Alexandrovskaya, who competed for Australia in the 2018 Winter Olympics, died July 17 at the age of 20. She reportedly retired from competitive skating in February after splitting from Australian partner Harley Windsor. The duo first began skating together in 2016, winning the world junior title in 2017. Alexandrovskaya was granted Australian citizenship so that the duo could skate together at the 2018 Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. They finished in 18th place. Eric Bolte-USA TODAY Sports
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Tanzania's former president Benjamin Mkapa, who worked to end conflict in East Africa during and after his decade in power from 1995, died July 24 at the age of 81. Mkapa won the country's first multi-party elections in 1995 and was re-elected for a second five-year term in 2000. He led several regional peace mediation initiatives and afterwards continued to seek reconciliation in Burundi, Kenya, Democratic Republic of Congo and the Great Lakes region. Mkapa, a former journalist, also served as an ambassador, foreign minister and leading official of the ruling CCM party. Tanzania's third president following independence, he oversaw macroeconomic reforms that helped stabilize a struggling economy and secured debt relief from foreign donors. 

REUTERS/Antony Njuguna

Tanzania's former president Benjamin Mkapa, who worked to end conflict in East Africa during and after his decade in power from 1995, died July 24 at the age of 81. Mkapa won the country's first multi-party elections in 1995 and was re-elected for a...more

Tanzania's former president Benjamin Mkapa, who worked to end conflict in East Africa during and after his decade in power from 1995, died July 24 at the age of 81. Mkapa won the country's first multi-party elections in 1995 and was re-elected for a second five-year term in 2000. He led several regional peace mediation initiatives and afterwards continued to seek reconciliation in Burundi, Kenya, Democratic Republic of Congo and the Great Lakes region. Mkapa, a former journalist, also served as an ambassador, foreign minister and leading official of the ruling CCM party. Tanzania's third president following independence, he oversaw macroeconomic reforms that helped stabilize a struggling economy and secured debt relief from foreign donors. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna
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American actress Kelly Preston, who has appeared in films including "Jerry Maguire" and "Twins," died July 12 aged 57 after battling breast cancer for nearly two years, her husband John Travolta announced Sunday. Preston secured her first film role in the 1985 romcom "Mischief," then appeared in another teen comedy, "Secret Admirer." In the next few years Preston starred in films such as "SpaceCamp" and then "Twins" with Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito. In "Jerry Maguire," she played Tom Cruise's fiancee Avery Bishop, then co-starred opposite Kevin Costner in "For Love of the Game." Preston last starred in the 2018 film "Gotti" in which she played Victoria Gotti, the wife of Mafia boss John Gotti, who was portrayed on screen by Travolta. Preston and Travolta met in 1988 when they appeared together in a film called "The Experts." They married in 1991. Preston is survived by her husband and their children - daughter Ella, 20, and 9-year-old son Benjamin. Their son Jett died at age 16 in January 2009 during a family vacation in the Bahamas.

REUTERS/Eric Gaillard

American actress Kelly Preston, who has appeared in films including "Jerry Maguire" and "Twins," died July 12 aged 57 after battling breast cancer for nearly two years, her husband John Travolta announced Sunday. Preston secured her first film role...more

American actress Kelly Preston, who has appeared in films including "Jerry Maguire" and "Twins," died July 12 aged 57 after battling breast cancer for nearly two years, her husband John Travolta announced Sunday. Preston secured her first film role in the 1985 romcom "Mischief," then appeared in another teen comedy, "Secret Admirer." In the next few years Preston starred in films such as "SpaceCamp" and then "Twins" with Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito. In "Jerry Maguire," she played Tom Cruise's fiancee Avery Bishop, then co-starred opposite Kevin Costner in "For Love of the Game." Preston last starred in the 2018 film "Gotti" in which she played Victoria Gotti, the wife of Mafia boss John Gotti, who was portrayed on screen by Travolta. Preston and Travolta met in 1988 when they appeared together in a film called "The Experts." They married in 1991. Preston is survived by her husband and their children - daughter Ella, 20, and 9-year-old son Benjamin. Their son Jett died at age 16 in January 2009 during a family vacation in the Bahamas. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
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"Glee" star Naya Rivera died of accidental drowning on July 8, marking the third tragic passing of a cast member from the popular television musical series. Rivera, 33, played cheerleader Santana Lopez on the 2009-2015 TV series about a high-school choir. She was found in Lake Piru, near Los Angeles, five days after going missing on a boating trip with her young son. Rivera's 4-year-old son, Josey, who was discovered alone and sleeping on the boat, told authorities he and his mother had both gone swimming in the lake. Sheriff's officials said it was not clear what happened, but that Rivera's son had told investigators his mother pushed him back into the boat but did not get back in herself.

REUTERS/Kevork Djansezian

"Glee" star Naya Rivera died of accidental drowning on July 8, marking the third tragic passing of a cast member from the popular television musical series. Rivera, 33, played cheerleader Santana Lopez on the 2009-2015 TV series about a high-school...more

"Glee" star Naya Rivera died of accidental drowning on July 8, marking the third tragic passing of a cast member from the popular television musical series. Rivera, 33, played cheerleader Santana Lopez on the 2009-2015 TV series about a high-school choir. She was found in Lake Piru, near Los Angeles, five days after going missing on a boating trip with her young son. Rivera's 4-year-old son, Josey, who was discovered alone and sleeping on the boat, told authorities he and his mother had both gone swimming in the lake. Sheriff's officials said it was not clear what happened, but that Rivera's son had told investigators his mother pushed him back into the boat but did not get back in herself. REUTERS/Kevork Djansezian
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Ennio Morricone, whose scores for movies such as "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly," "The Mission" and "Cinema Paradiso" made him one of the world's most famous screen composers, died July 6 at age 91. Morricone won two Oscars and dozens of others awards including Golden Globes, Grammys and BAFTAs. He wrote for hundreds of films, television programs, popular songs and orchestras, but it was his friendship with Italian director Sergio Leone that brought him fame, with scores for Spaghetti Westerns starring Clint Eastwood in the 1960s. They include the so-called "Dollars Trilogy" - "A Fistful of Dollars," "For a Few Dollars More," and "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly." Morricone used unconventional instruments such as the Jew's harp, amplified harmonica, mariachi trumpets, cor anglais and the ocarina - an ancient Chinese instrument shaped like an egg. The music was accompanied by real sounds such as whistling, cracking of whips, gunshots and sounds inspired by wild animals including coyotes. He always tried to shake off the association with the Spaghetti Westerns, reminding people, particularly outside Italy, that he had a very creative and productive life before and after the films he made with Leone. "It's a strait-jacket. I just don't understand how, after all the films I have done, people keep thinking about 'A Fistful of Dollars'. People are stuck back in time, 30 years ago," the Maestro, as he was known in Italy, told Reuters in 2007. One of Morricone's most evocative soundtracks was for the 1986 film "The Mission," by Roland Joffe, for which he was nominated for an Oscar and won a Golden Globe.

REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

Ennio Morricone, whose scores for movies such as "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly," "The Mission" and "Cinema Paradiso" made him one of the world's most famous screen composers, died July 6 at age 91. Morricone won two Oscars and dozens of others...more

Ennio Morricone, whose scores for movies such as "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly," "The Mission" and "Cinema Paradiso" made him one of the world's most famous screen composers, died July 6 at age 91. Morricone won two Oscars and dozens of others awards including Golden Globes, Grammys and BAFTAs. He wrote for hundreds of films, television programs, popular songs and orchestras, but it was his friendship with Italian director Sergio Leone that brought him fame, with scores for Spaghetti Westerns starring Clint Eastwood in the 1960s. They include the so-called "Dollars Trilogy" - "A Fistful of Dollars," "For a Few Dollars More," and "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly." Morricone used unconventional instruments such as the Jew's harp, amplified harmonica, mariachi trumpets, cor anglais and the ocarina - an ancient Chinese instrument shaped like an egg. The music was accompanied by real sounds such as whistling, cracking of whips, gunshots and sounds inspired by wild animals including coyotes. He always tried to shake off the association with the Spaghetti Westerns, reminding people, particularly outside Italy, that he had a very creative and productive life before and after the films he made with Leone. "It's a strait-jacket. I just don't understand how, after all the films I have done, people keep thinking about 'A Fistful of Dollars'. People are stuck back in time, 30 years ago," the Maestro, as he was known in Italy, told Reuters in 2007. One of Morricone's most evocative soundtracks was for the 1986 film "The Mission," by Roland Joffe, for which he was nominated for an Oscar and won a Golden Globe. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch
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Country music band leader Charlie Daniels, singer and fiddler player on the Grammy-winning hit "The Devil Went Down to Georgia," died July 6 at age 83. Daniels, a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Grand Ole Opry, died from a stroke. A fiddler, guitarist, singer and songwriter, Daniels founded The Charlie Daniels Band in 1972 and maintained a busy tour schedule for decades with more than 100 dates each year. The band's hits included "Uneasy Rider," "Long Haired Country Boy" and "In America." The 1979 song "Devil Went Down to Georgia," which featured Daniels on vocals and fiddle, has been called one of the best country songs of all time. The song, the story of a young man who challenges the devil to a fiddle-playing contest, won a Grammy for best country vocal by a group. Born in Wilmington, North Carolina, Daniels began his career playing in a bluegrass band before moving to Nashville to work as a session musician for artists including Bob Dylan. He also recorded gospel albums and won a Dove Award in 1995.

REUTERS/Harrison McClary

Country music band leader Charlie Daniels, singer and fiddler player on the Grammy-winning hit "The Devil Went Down to Georgia," died July 6 at age 83. Daniels, a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Grand Ole Opry, died from a stroke. A...more

Country music band leader Charlie Daniels, singer and fiddler player on the Grammy-winning hit "The Devil Went Down to Georgia," died July 6 at age 83. Daniels, a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Grand Ole Opry, died from a stroke. A fiddler, guitarist, singer and songwriter, Daniels founded The Charlie Daniels Band in 1972 and maintained a busy tour schedule for decades with more than 100 dates each year. The band's hits included "Uneasy Rider," "Long Haired Country Boy" and "In America." The 1979 song "Devil Went Down to Georgia," which featured Daniels on vocals and fiddle, has been called one of the best country songs of all time. The song, the story of a young man who challenges the devil to a fiddle-playing contest, won a Grammy for best country vocal by a group. Born in Wilmington, North Carolina, Daniels began his career playing in a bluegrass band before moving to Nashville to work as a session musician for artists including Bob Dylan. He also recorded gospel albums and won a Dove Award in 1995. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
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Carl Reiner, a driving force in American comedy as a writer for television pioneer Sid Caesar, partner of Mel Brooks and creator and co-star of the classic sitcom "The Dick Van Dyke Show," died June 30 at age 98. His career spanned seven decades and every medium from theater and recordings to television and movies, including directing "Oh, God!," three collaborations with Steve Martin and a role as an elderly con man in the revived "Ocean's Eleven" series. Reiner is survived by three children, including Rob Reiner, director of several hit movies and known for playing Archie Bunker's son-in-law "Meathead" in the hit TV comedy "All in the Family." Reiner's wife of 64 years, Estelle, died in 2008. Reiner expressed his approach to his work in his book "My Anecdotal Life," when he said, "Inviting people to laugh at you while you are laughing at yourself is a good thing to do. You may be the fool but you are the fool in charge."

REUTERS/Danny Moloshok

Carl Reiner, a driving force in American comedy as a writer for television pioneer Sid Caesar, partner of Mel Brooks and creator and co-star of the classic sitcom "The Dick Van Dyke Show," died June 30 at age 98. His career spanned seven decades and...more

Carl Reiner, a driving force in American comedy as a writer for television pioneer Sid Caesar, partner of Mel Brooks and creator and co-star of the classic sitcom "The Dick Van Dyke Show," died June 30 at age 98. His career spanned seven decades and every medium from theater and recordings to television and movies, including directing "Oh, God!," three collaborations with Steve Martin and a role as an elderly con man in the revived "Ocean's Eleven" series. Reiner is survived by three children, including Rob Reiner, director of several hit movies and known for playing Archie Bunker's son-in-law "Meathead" in the hit TV comedy "All in the Family." Reiner's wife of 64 years, Estelle, died in 2008. Reiner expressed his approach to his work in his book "My Anecdotal Life," when he said, "Inviting people to laugh at you while you are laughing at yourself is a good thing to do. You may be the fool but you are the fool in charge." REUTERS/Danny Moloshok
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Christo, the Bulgarian-born artist best known for his temporary installations based on wrapping the exteriors of landmark buildings, bridges and outdoor spaces, died May 31 at age 84 of natural causes at his home in New York City. Christo escaped from then-Communist Bulgaria in 1957, first to Prague and then to Vienna and Geneva. A year later, he moved to Paris, where he met his wife and art partner, Jeanne-Claude Denat de Guillebon. He lived in New York for 56 years. In 2018, he presented "The London Mastaba" - a 66-foot-high (20-meter) sculpture of an ancient Egyptian tomb, made from 7,506 red, white and mauve barrels put on a platform in a lake in London's Hyde Park. Christo and Jeanne-Claude, who died in 2009, are also known for such works as "The Gates," a 2005 installation in New York's Central Park, and the wrapping of the Reichstag in Berlin in 1995 in a vast silvery curtain. His latest project envisioned wrapping the Arc de Triomphe in Paris in 269,100 square feet (25,000 square meters) of recyclable polypropylene fabric in silvery blue and 23,000 feet (7,000 meters) of red rope.

REUTERS/Simon Dawson

Christo, the Bulgarian-born artist best known for his temporary installations based on wrapping the exteriors of landmark buildings, bridges and outdoor spaces, died May 31 at age 84 of natural causes at his home in New York City. Christo escaped...more

Christo, the Bulgarian-born artist best known for his temporary installations based on wrapping the exteriors of landmark buildings, bridges and outdoor spaces, died May 31 at age 84 of natural causes at his home in New York City. Christo escaped from then-Communist Bulgaria in 1957, first to Prague and then to Vienna and Geneva. A year later, he moved to Paris, where he met his wife and art partner, Jeanne-Claude Denat de Guillebon. He lived in New York for 56 years. In 2018, he presented "The London Mastaba" - a 66-foot-high (20-meter) sculpture of an ancient Egyptian tomb, made from 7,506 red, white and mauve barrels put on a platform in a lake in London's Hyde Park. Christo and Jeanne-Claude, who died in 2009, are also known for such works as "The Gates," a 2005 installation in New York's Central Park, and the wrapping of the Reichstag in Berlin in 1995 in a vast silvery curtain. His latest project envisioned wrapping the Arc de Triomphe in Paris in 269,100 square feet (25,000 square meters) of recyclable polypropylene fabric in silvery blue and 23,000 feet (7,000 meters) of red rope. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
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Author Larry Kramer, whose early advocacy for a national response to AIDS as the disease first emerged in the 1980s helped raise awareness and shape healthcare policy into the 1990s, died May 27 at age 84. Kramer, who co-founded the ACT UP movement that made AIDS a national issue, died of pneumonia after enduring illness for much of his life, including his own battle with AIDS, said his close friend Will Schwalbe. Kramer, whose works include the award-winning 1985 play, "The Normal Heart," established himself as a fierce advocate for LGBTQ rights as the gay community, including many of his friends, became afflicted with AIDS, a newly emergent disease in the 1980s. He co-founded the Gay Men's Health Crisis (GMHC) organization in 1981 to help AIDS victims before co-founding the more militant ACT UP in 1987.

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Author Larry Kramer, whose early advocacy for a national response to AIDS as the disease first emerged in the 1980s helped raise awareness and shape healthcare policy into the 1990s, died May 27 at age 84. Kramer, who co-founded the ACT UP movement...more

Author Larry Kramer, whose early advocacy for a national response to AIDS as the disease first emerged in the 1980s helped raise awareness and shape healthcare policy into the 1990s, died May 27 at age 84. Kramer, who co-founded the ACT UP movement that made AIDS a national issue, died of pneumonia after enduring illness for much of his life, including his own battle with AIDS, said his close friend Will Schwalbe. Kramer, whose works include the award-winning 1985 play, "The Normal Heart," established himself as a fierce advocate for LGBTQ rights as the gay community, including many of his friends, became afflicted with AIDS, a newly emergent disease in the 1980s. He co-founded the Gay Men's Health Crisis (GMHC) organization in 1981 to help AIDS victims before co-founding the more militant ACT UP in 1987. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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Macau gambling king Stanley Ho, who built a business empire from scratch in the former Portuguese colony and became one of Asia's richest men, died May 26 at the age of 98. The flamboyant tycoon, who loved to dance and advised his nearest and dearest to shun gambling, headed one of the world's most lucrative gaming businesses through his flagship firm, SJM Holdings, valued at about $6 billion. Shielded from challengers by a four-decade monopoly on gambling, Ho helped transform Macau from a sleepy peninsula dotted with seedy, windowless gambling dens into the world's biggest casino center. But Ho's interests in Macau, on the coast of southeast China across the mouth of the Pearl River opposite Hong Kong, were not limited to the roulette wheels and baccarat tables. His privately held company, Sociedade de Turismo e Diversoes de Macau, or STDM, has stakes in everything from luxury hotels to helicopters and horse racing.

REUTERS/Bobby Yip

Macau gambling king Stanley Ho, who built a business empire from scratch in the former Portuguese colony and became one of Asia's richest men, died May 26 at the age of 98. The flamboyant tycoon, who loved to dance and advised his nearest and dearest...more

Macau gambling king Stanley Ho, who built a business empire from scratch in the former Portuguese colony and became one of Asia's richest men, died May 26 at the age of 98. The flamboyant tycoon, who loved to dance and advised his nearest and dearest to shun gambling, headed one of the world's most lucrative gaming businesses through his flagship firm, SJM Holdings, valued at about $6 billion. Shielded from challengers by a four-decade monopoly on gambling, Ho helped transform Macau from a sleepy peninsula dotted with seedy, windowless gambling dens into the world's biggest casino center. But Ho's interests in Macau, on the coast of southeast China across the mouth of the Pearl River opposite Hong Kong, were not limited to the roulette wheels and baccarat tables. His privately held company, Sociedade de Turismo e Diversoes de Macau, or STDM, has stakes in everything from luxury hotels to helicopters and horse racing. REUTERS/Bobby Yip
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Fred Willard, the comic actor known for his genial but dunderheaded characters, died May 15 at age 86. He was an astonishingly ubiquitous presence especially on TV but also in movies for decades, though almost always in small but memorable roles. Willard was nominated four times for Emmy Awards, three of them for his role as Hank on "Everybody Loves Raymond." In 2015 he won a Daytime Emmy for a story arc as John Forrester on "The Bold and the Beautiful." The actor was long associated with improvisational comedy, going back to his days at Chicago's Second City in the 1960s and continuing with his small role in Rob Reiner's documentary-style "This Is Spinal Tap" and the Christopher Guest-directed comedic mockumentaries such as "Best in Show," "A Mighty Wind" and "Mascots."

REUTERS/Danny Moloshok

Fred Willard, the comic actor known for his genial but dunderheaded characters, died May 15 at age 86. He was an astonishingly ubiquitous presence especially on TV but also in movies for decades, though almost always in small but memorable roles....more

Fred Willard, the comic actor known for his genial but dunderheaded characters, died May 15 at age 86. He was an astonishingly ubiquitous presence especially on TV but also in movies for decades, though almost always in small but memorable roles. Willard was nominated four times for Emmy Awards, three of them for his role as Hank on "Everybody Loves Raymond." In 2015 he won a Daytime Emmy for a story arc as John Forrester on "The Bold and the Beautiful." The actor was long associated with improvisational comedy, going back to his days at Chicago's Second City in the 1960s and continuing with his small role in Rob Reiner's documentary-style "This Is Spinal Tap" and the Christopher Guest-directed comedic mockumentaries such as "Best in Show," "A Mighty Wind" and "Mascots." REUTERS/Danny Moloshok
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Aimee Stephens, a transgender woman at the center of a major LGBT rights battle, died May 12 at age 59, just as a ruling is anticipated in her workplace discrimination case before the U.S. Supreme Court. Her case before the nation's highest court involves whether or not a Detroit funeral home violated federal law by firing Stephens after she revealed plans to transition to female from male. The court is considering whether gay and trans workers are covered under the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964, which bars employers from discriminating against workers on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin and religion. The administration of President Donald Trump has argued that sexual orientation or gender identity are not covered by the law, and the ruling is expected to have implications for workplace discrimination protections for transgender workers. "Aimee did not set out to be a hero and a trailblazer, but she is one, and our country owes her a debt of gratitude for her commitment to justice," said Chase Strangio, one of the ACLU attorneys representing her. "When Aimee decided to fight back after she was fired for being transgender, she just wanted it to be acknowledged that what happened to her was wrong."

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Aimee Stephens, a transgender woman at the center of a major LGBT rights battle, died May 12 at age 59, just as a ruling is anticipated in her workplace discrimination case before the U.S. Supreme Court. Her case before the nation's highest court...more

Aimee Stephens, a transgender woman at the center of a major LGBT rights battle, died May 12 at age 59, just as a ruling is anticipated in her workplace discrimination case before the U.S. Supreme Court. Her case before the nation's highest court involves whether or not a Detroit funeral home violated federal law by firing Stephens after she revealed plans to transition to female from male. The court is considering whether gay and trans workers are covered under the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964, which bars employers from discriminating against workers on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin and religion. The administration of President Donald Trump has argued that sexual orientation or gender identity are not covered by the law, and the ruling is expected to have implications for workplace discrimination protections for transgender workers. "Aimee did not set out to be a hero and a trailblazer, but she is one, and our country owes her a debt of gratitude for her commitment to justice," said Chase Strangio, one of the ACLU attorneys representing her. "When Aimee decided to fight back after she was fired for being transgender, she just wanted it to be acknowledged that what happened to her was wrong." REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Jerry Stiller, who played two of American television's most cantankerous fathers on the sitcoms "Seinfeld" and "The King of Queens," died May 11 aged 92. In 1993, Stiller had thought his entertainment career was nearing an end when he got a phone call from Larry David, co-creator of "Seinfeld," about joining the cast led by comedian Jerry Seinfeld. The show, one of the most highly regarded in U.S. TV history, was in its fourth season at the time but Stiller said he had never watched a minute of it and had to ask, "Who's Seinfeld?" The show ended its nine-year run in 1998 and that same year Stiller moved into another sitcom dad role on "The King of Queens."

REUTERS/Eric Thayer

Jerry Stiller, who played two of American television's most cantankerous fathers on the sitcoms "Seinfeld" and "The King of Queens," died May 11 aged 92. In 1993, Stiller had thought his entertainment career was nearing an end when he got a phone...more

Jerry Stiller, who played two of American television's most cantankerous fathers on the sitcoms "Seinfeld" and "The King of Queens," died May 11 aged 92. In 1993, Stiller had thought his entertainment career was nearing an end when he got a phone call from Larry David, co-creator of "Seinfeld," about joining the cast led by comedian Jerry Seinfeld. The show, one of the most highly regarded in U.S. TV history, was in its fourth season at the time but Stiller said he had never watched a minute of it and had to ask, "Who's Seinfeld?" The show ended its nine-year run in 1998 and that same year Stiller moved into another sitcom dad role on "The King of Queens." REUTERS/Eric Thayer
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Little Richard, the self-proclaimed "architect of rock 'n' roll" who built his ground-breaking sound with a boiling blend of boogie-woogie, rhythm and blues and gospel, died on May 9 at the age of 87. Richard, a Grammy Award winner and inductee to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame whose electrifying 1950s hits such as "Tutti Frutti" and "Long Tall Sally" and flamboyant stage presence influenced legions of performers, succumbed to cancer. At his peak in the late 1950s and early '60s, Richard shouted, moaned, screamed and trilled hits while pounding the piano like a mad man and punctuating lyrics with an occasional shrill "whoooo!" The music drew in both young black and white fans at a time when parts of the United States still were strictly segregated. Many white artists, such as Pat Boone, had their own hit versions of Richard's songs, albeit considerably toned down and "safer" for the pop audience. "I've always thought that rock 'n' roll brought the races together," Richard once told an interviewer. "Although I was black, the fans didn't care. I used to feel good about that."

REUTERS/Alonso Gonzalez

Little Richard, the self-proclaimed "architect of rock 'n' roll" who built his ground-breaking sound with a boiling blend of boogie-woogie, rhythm and blues and gospel, died on May 9 at the age of 87. Richard, a Grammy Award winner and inductee to...more

Little Richard, the self-proclaimed "architect of rock 'n' roll" who built his ground-breaking sound with a boiling blend of boogie-woogie, rhythm and blues and gospel, died on May 9 at the age of 87. Richard, a Grammy Award winner and inductee to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame whose electrifying 1950s hits such as "Tutti Frutti" and "Long Tall Sally" and flamboyant stage presence influenced legions of performers, succumbed to cancer. At his peak in the late 1950s and early '60s, Richard shouted, moaned, screamed and trilled hits while pounding the piano like a mad man and punctuating lyrics with an occasional shrill "whoooo!" The music drew in both young black and white fans at a time when parts of the United States still were strictly segregated. Many white artists, such as Pat Boone, had their own hit versions of Richard's songs, albeit considerably toned down and "safer" for the pop audience. "I've always thought that rock 'n' roll brought the races together," Richard once told an interviewer. "Although I was black, the fans didn't care. I used to feel good about that." REUTERS/Alonso Gonzalez
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Magician Roy Horn, who alongside Siegfried Fischbacher starred in a popular, long-running Las Vegas act built around rare tigers, died on May 8 from of complications of COVID-19, the Las Vegas Review-Journal newspaper reported. He was 75. Fischbacher and Horn, who were both born in Germany, co-founded their stage act after meeting on a cruise ship in the late 1950s before bringing the show to Las Vegas in 1967 and performing for the next four decades. "Today, the world has lost one of the greats of magic, but I have lost my best friend," Fischbacher said in a statement to the Review-Journal. "From the moment we met, I knew Roy and I, together, would change the world. There could be no Siegfried without Roy, and no Roy without Siegfried." Horn was seriously injured in 2003 when he was mauled by a white tiger during a performance at the Mirage hotel in Las Vegas on his 59th birthday. The attack ended their show on the Las Vegas strip but the pair continued to make public appearances.

REUTERS/Las Vegas Sun/Steve Marcus

Magician Roy Horn, who alongside Siegfried Fischbacher starred in a popular, long-running Las Vegas act built around rare tigers, died on May 8 from of complications of COVID-19, the Las Vegas Review-Journal newspaper reported. He was 75. Fischbacher...more

Magician Roy Horn, who alongside Siegfried Fischbacher starred in a popular, long-running Las Vegas act built around rare tigers, died on May 8 from of complications of COVID-19, the Las Vegas Review-Journal newspaper reported. He was 75. Fischbacher and Horn, who were both born in Germany, co-founded their stage act after meeting on a cruise ship in the late 1950s before bringing the show to Las Vegas in 1967 and performing for the next four decades. "Today, the world has lost one of the greats of magic, but I have lost my best friend," Fischbacher said in a statement to the Review-Journal. "From the moment we met, I knew Roy and I, together, would change the world. There could be no Siegfried without Roy, and no Roy without Siegfried." Horn was seriously injured in 2003 when he was mauled by a white tiger during a performance at the Mirage hotel in Las Vegas on his 59th birthday. The attack ended their show on the Las Vegas strip but the pair continued to make public appearances. REUTERS/Las Vegas Sun/Steve Marcus
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Florian Schneider, co-founder of pioneering German electronic band Kraftwerk (R, performing in Montreux in July 2005), died May 6 of cancer aged 73, longtime bandmate Ralf Huetter said. Kraftwerk have been a major influence for musicians ranging from Detroit techno star Juan Atkins to pop act the Pet Shop Boys and David Bowie, and is widely seen as among the first to popularize electronic music, with eventual commercial success. Schneider and Huetter founded Kraftwerk in 1970 after meeting at a music academy in Duesseldorf, the German industrial city that they made their base, and they rapidly dispensed entirely with acoustic instruments. The son of prominent modern architect Paul Schneider-Esleben, Schneider started out playing the flute, later customizing it with original electronic effects and applying the same techniques to violins and electric guitars. Subsequent artists like the Pet Shop Boys credit Kraftwerk's brand of rhythmic, minimalist noise, often generated on home-made electronic instruments at "Kling-Klang," their studio-cum-laboratory in Duesseldorf, with transforming the sound of popular music, starting out less than a year after the Woodstock rock festival. Autobahn (1974) was a surprise international hit and the band's most memorable, a tone poem evoking the sonic monotony of cruising down Germany's sleek motorways with the sounds of doppler-shifted car horns and badly-tuned radios.

REUTERS/Dominic Favre

Florian Schneider, co-founder of pioneering German electronic band Kraftwerk (R, performing in Montreux in July 2005), died May 6 of cancer aged 73, longtime bandmate Ralf Huetter said. Kraftwerk have been a major influence for musicians ranging from...more

Florian Schneider, co-founder of pioneering German electronic band Kraftwerk (R, performing in Montreux in July 2005), died May 6 of cancer aged 73, longtime bandmate Ralf Huetter said. Kraftwerk have been a major influence for musicians ranging from Detroit techno star Juan Atkins to pop act the Pet Shop Boys and David Bowie, and is widely seen as among the first to popularize electronic music, with eventual commercial success. Schneider and Huetter founded Kraftwerk in 1970 after meeting at a music academy in Duesseldorf, the German industrial city that they made their base, and they rapidly dispensed entirely with acoustic instruments. The son of prominent modern architect Paul Schneider-Esleben, Schneider started out playing the flute, later customizing it with original electronic effects and applying the same techniques to violins and electric guitars. Subsequent artists like the Pet Shop Boys credit Kraftwerk's brand of rhythmic, minimalist noise, often generated on home-made electronic instruments at "Kling-Klang," their studio-cum-laboratory in Duesseldorf, with transforming the sound of popular music, starting out less than a year after the Woodstock rock festival. Autobahn (1974) was a surprise international hit and the band's most memorable, a tone poem evoking the sonic monotony of cruising down Germany's sleek motorways with the sounds of doppler-shifted car horns and badly-tuned radios. REUTERS/Dominic Favre
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Indian actor Rishi Kapoor, who starred in celebrated Bollywood movies such as "Bobby" and "Mera Naam Joker," died on April 30 at age 67 after a two-year battle with leukemia, his family said. Kapoor came from a family of actors. His grandfather, Prithviraj Kapoor, father Raj Kapoor, brothers Randhir and Rajeev, and his son, nieces and nephews have all played roles in films. He made his debut at the age of 16, playing a younger version of his father's character in the 1970 film "Mera Naam Joker" (My Name is Joker), and later made a name for himself as a fresh-faced romantic hero.

REUTERS/Manav Manglani

Indian actor Rishi Kapoor, who starred in celebrated Bollywood movies such as "Bobby" and "Mera Naam Joker," died on April 30 at age 67 after a two-year battle with leukemia, his family said. Kapoor came from a family of actors. His grandfather,...more

Indian actor Rishi Kapoor, who starred in celebrated Bollywood movies such as "Bobby" and "Mera Naam Joker," died on April 30 at age 67 after a two-year battle with leukemia, his family said. Kapoor came from a family of actors. His grandfather, Prithviraj Kapoor, father Raj Kapoor, brothers Randhir and Rajeev, and his son, nieces and nephews have all played roles in films. He made his debut at the age of 16, playing a younger version of his father's character in the 1970 film "Mera Naam Joker" (My Name is Joker), and later made a name for himself as a fresh-faced romantic hero. REUTERS/Manav Manglani
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Irrfan Khan, an Indian actor who brought versatility and style to recent hit films and had roles in Hollywood movies such as "Life of Pi" and "The Namesake," died on April 29 aged 54. He was among the first Indian actors to make a consistent mark in Western cinema. Khan worked in serials for Indian television for close to a decade and sought bit parts in films. In 2001, as he was close to giving up, British filmmaker Asif Kapadia offered him the lead role in "The Warrior." The film won a BAFTA for Best British Film and was Britain's entry to the Oscars. It also opened the doors to Hollywood, which appreciated Khan long before Bollywood claimed him. He went on to act in indie hits such as Mira Nair's "The Namesake," winning praise for his sensitive portrayal of a man who moves to the United States and grapples with the crises of identity that first-generation immigrants can face.

REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Irrfan Khan, an Indian actor who brought versatility and style to recent hit films and had roles in Hollywood movies such as "Life of Pi" and "The Namesake," died on April 29 aged 54. He was among the first Indian actors to make a consistent mark in...more

Irrfan Khan, an Indian actor who brought versatility and style to recent hit films and had roles in Hollywood movies such as "Life of Pi" and "The Namesake," died on April 29 aged 54. He was among the first Indian actors to make a consistent mark in Western cinema. Khan worked in serials for Indian television for close to a decade and sought bit parts in films. In 2001, as he was close to giving up, British filmmaker Asif Kapadia offered him the lead role in "The Warrior." The film won a BAFTA for Best British Film and was Britain's entry to the Oscars. It also opened the doors to Hollywood, which appreciated Khan long before Bollywood claimed him. He went on to act in indie hits such as Mira Nair's "The Namesake," winning praise for his sensitive portrayal of a man who moves to the United States and grapples with the crises of identity that first-generation immigrants can face. REUTERS/Mark Blinch
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Linda Tripp, the former U.S. civil servant whose secretly taped telephone conversations with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky documented the sex scandal that led to then-President Bill Clinton's 1998 impeachment, died on April 8 at age 70. Tripp was a secretary in the White House counsel's office in the early years of Clinton's presidency before she was transferred to the Pentagon's public affairs office and befriended Lewinsky, 24 years her junior. As the two became close, Tripp began clandestinely recording their private telephone conversations in which Lewinsky documented her affair with the president in graphic detail. Tripp ultimately turned over hours of those tapes to Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr, who was investigating potential wrongdoing by Clinton, the former Arkansas governor, stemming from the failed Whitewater real estate venture in the Ozarks. Tripp was granted immunity from illegal wiretapping charges in exchange for the recordings. On the basis of the tapes, Starr obtained permission to expand his probe into the Clinton-Lewinsky affair.

REUTERS/Mark Wilson

Linda Tripp, the former U.S. civil servant whose secretly taped telephone conversations with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky documented the sex scandal that led to then-President Bill Clinton's 1998 impeachment, died on April 8 at age 70....more

Linda Tripp, the former U.S. civil servant whose secretly taped telephone conversations with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky documented the sex scandal that led to then-President Bill Clinton's 1998 impeachment, died on April 8 at age 70. Tripp was a secretary in the White House counsel's office in the early years of Clinton's presidency before she was transferred to the Pentagon's public affairs office and befriended Lewinsky, 24 years her junior. As the two became close, Tripp began clandestinely recording their private telephone conversations in which Lewinsky documented her affair with the president in graphic detail. Tripp ultimately turned over hours of those tapes to Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr, who was investigating potential wrongdoing by Clinton, the former Arkansas governor, stemming from the failed Whitewater real estate venture in the Ozarks. Tripp was granted immunity from illegal wiretapping charges in exchange for the recordings. On the basis of the tapes, Starr obtained permission to expand his probe into the Clinton-Lewinsky affair. REUTERS/Mark Wilson
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Grammy-winning singer John Prine, who wrote his early songs in his head while delivering mail and later emerged from Chicago's folk revival scene in the 1970s to become one of the most influential songwriters of his generation, died April 7. He was 73. Prine was hospitalized on March 26 suffering from symptoms of COVID-19, according to his wife, Fiona Whelan Prine, who was also his manager. Singer-songwriter Kris Kristofferson fatefully saw Prine performing at the Earl of Old Town club, leading to Prine's signing with Atlantic Records and self-titled debut album, released in 1971. That album, widely praised by critics, contained several songs that would become staples of Prine's catalog. They included "Angel from Montgomery," about a woman wishing for deliverance from her unfulfilling life, "Paradise," about a Kentucky town devastated by strip mining, and "Sam Stone," chronicling the downward spiral of a drug-addicted Vietnam War veteran and containing the oft-quoted refrain: "There's a hole in daddy's arm where all the money goes, Jesus Christ died for nothin I suppose." The songs have since each been covered dozens of times by other artists. His early songwriting style earned comparisons with no less than folk great Bob Dylan, who later called Prine one of his favorites.

REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Grammy-winning singer John Prine, who wrote his early songs in his head while delivering mail and later emerged from Chicago's folk revival scene in the 1970s to become one of the most influential songwriters of his generation, died April 7. He was...more

Grammy-winning singer John Prine, who wrote his early songs in his head while delivering mail and later emerged from Chicago's folk revival scene in the 1970s to become one of the most influential songwriters of his generation, died April 7. He was 73. Prine was hospitalized on March 26 suffering from symptoms of COVID-19, according to his wife, Fiona Whelan Prine, who was also his manager. Singer-songwriter Kris Kristofferson fatefully saw Prine performing at the Earl of Old Town club, leading to Prine's signing with Atlantic Records and self-titled debut album, released in 1971. That album, widely praised by critics, contained several songs that would become staples of Prine's catalog. They included "Angel from Montgomery," about a woman wishing for deliverance from her unfulfilling life, "Paradise," about a Kentucky town devastated by strip mining, and "Sam Stone," chronicling the downward spiral of a drug-addicted Vietnam War veteran and containing the oft-quoted refrain: "There's a hole in daddy's arm where all the money goes, Jesus Christ died for nothin I suppose." The songs have since each been covered dozens of times by other artists. His early songwriting style earned comparisons with no less than folk great Bob Dylan, who later called Prine one of his favorites. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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Bill Withers, a soulful singer best known for the 1970s hits "Lean on Me," "Lovely Day" and "Ain't No Sunshine," died March 30 at age 81 from heart complications, Rolling Stone magazine reported, citing a statement from his family. "A solitary man with a heart driven to connect to the world at large, with his poetry and music, he spoke honestly to people and connected them to each other," the statement said. "As private a life as he lived close to intimate family and friends, his music forever belongs to the world. In this difficult time, we pray his music offers comfort and entertainment as fans hold tight to loved ones." Withers produced nine albums, most of them written and recorded in the 1970s, starting with the album "Just As I Am," which included "Ain't No Sunshine," which won him the first of three Grammy Awards, according to his official website. His musical career ebbed in the 1980s as he left "the hype and the hoopla" of the musical spotlight for a more private life, it said.

REUTERS/Chris Pizzello

Bill Withers, a soulful singer best known for the 1970s hits "Lean on Me," "Lovely Day" and "Ain't No Sunshine," died March 30 at age 81 from heart complications, Rolling Stone magazine reported, citing a statement from his family. "A solitary man...more

Bill Withers, a soulful singer best known for the 1970s hits "Lean on Me," "Lovely Day" and "Ain't No Sunshine," died March 30 at age 81 from heart complications, Rolling Stone magazine reported, citing a statement from his family. "A solitary man with a heart driven to connect to the world at large, with his poetry and music, he spoke honestly to people and connected them to each other," the statement said. "As private a life as he lived close to intimate family and friends, his music forever belongs to the world. In this difficult time, we pray his music offers comfort and entertainment as fans hold tight to loved ones." Withers produced nine albums, most of them written and recorded in the 1970s, starting with the album "Just As I Am," which included "Ain't No Sunshine," which won him the first of three Grammy Awards, according to his official website. His musical career ebbed in the 1980s as he left "the hype and the hoopla" of the musical spotlight for a more private life, it said. REUTERS/Chris Pizzello
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The Reverend Joseph Lowery, a key ally of Martin Luther King in the U.S. civil rights movement of the 1960s, died March 27 at the age of 98. Lowery was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, by President Barack Obama in 2009, a few months after he had given the benediction at Obama's inauguration (pictured). Lowery co-founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference with King and other black ministers in 1957, to fight segregation across the U.S. South. He served for 20 years as its president before stepping down in 1998. He continued working for racial equality into his 90s. He spoke against South African apartheid, sought better conditions in U.S. jails, pushed for more economic opportunities for minorities, promoted AIDS education and railed against what he saw as government indifference toward the lower classes.

REUTERS/Jason Reed

The Reverend Joseph Lowery, a key ally of Martin Luther King in the U.S. civil rights movement of the 1960s, died March 27 at the age of 98. Lowery was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, by President...more

The Reverend Joseph Lowery, a key ally of Martin Luther King in the U.S. civil rights movement of the 1960s, died March 27 at the age of 98. Lowery was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, by President Barack Obama in 2009, a few months after he had given the benediction at Obama's inauguration (pictured). Lowery co-founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference with King and other black ministers in 1957, to fight segregation across the U.S. South. He served for 20 years as its president before stepping down in 1998. He continued working for racial equality into his 90s. He spoke against South African apartheid, sought better conditions in U.S. jails, pushed for more economic opportunities for minorities, promoted AIDS education and railed against what he saw as government indifference toward the lower classes. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Manolis Glezos, a prominent Greek whose act of defiance against Nazi occupation during World War Two was a rallying cry for the country's resistance movement, died March 30 at the age of 97. Revered across Greece's political spectrum, Glezos was most famous for scaling the steep walls of the Acropolis with a friend in 1941 to take down the swastika and replace it with the Greek flag. It was the first visible act of resistance against the Nazis, who occupied Greece between 1941 and 1944. He was sentenced to death in absentia. With his white mane of hair and thick mustache, Glezos was a recognizable fixture in leftist politics. In his late eighties, he braved police teargas at protest rallies against tough cuts imposed in exchange for international bailouts that kept the Greek economy afloat between 2010 and 2015. At the age of 91, in 2014, he became a member of the European Parliament representing Syriza, the left-wing party which came to power in 2015. He resigned a year later. Asked what had kept him at the forefront of politics for so long, Glezos told Reuters in 2012 that it was the memories of dead comrades. "Before every battle, every protest, we told each other: 'If you live, don't forget me'. I am paying a debt to those I lost during those difficult years. My only regret is that I haven't done more."

REUTERS/John Kolesidis

Manolis Glezos, a prominent Greek whose act of defiance against Nazi occupation during World War Two was a rallying cry for the country's resistance movement, died March 30 at the age of 97. Revered across Greece's political spectrum, Glezos was most...more

Manolis Glezos, a prominent Greek whose act of defiance against Nazi occupation during World War Two was a rallying cry for the country's resistance movement, died March 30 at the age of 97. Revered across Greece's political spectrum, Glezos was most famous for scaling the steep walls of the Acropolis with a friend in 1941 to take down the swastika and replace it with the Greek flag. It was the first visible act of resistance against the Nazis, who occupied Greece between 1941 and 1944. He was sentenced to death in absentia. With his white mane of hair and thick mustache, Glezos was a recognizable fixture in leftist politics. In his late eighties, he braved police teargas at protest rallies against tough cuts imposed in exchange for international bailouts that kept the Greek economy afloat between 2010 and 2015. At the age of 91, in 2014, he became a member of the European Parliament representing Syriza, the left-wing party which came to power in 2015. He resigned a year later. Asked what had kept him at the forefront of politics for so long, Glezos told Reuters in 2012 that it was the memories of dead comrades. "Before every battle, every protest, we told each other: 'If you live, don't forget me'. I am paying a debt to those I lost during those difficult years. My only regret is that I haven't done more." REUTERS/John Kolesidis
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Tony award-winning playwright Terrence McNally died March 24 of complications related to the coronavirus at age 81. The Broadway theater veteran was a lung cancer survivor and had lived with a chronic respiratory condition. McNally's career spanned six decades, encompassing plays, musicals and operas. It ranged from AIDS dramas "Lips Together, Teeth Apart," to domestic drama "Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune," and the stage musical adaptation of movie "The Full Monty." He was given a lifetime achievement award at the 2019 Tony Awards ceremony in New York, adding to the four he received for "Love! Valour! Compassion," "Master Class" and the books of the musical versions of "Ragtime" and "Kiss of the Spider Woman." REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

Tony award-winning playwright Terrence McNally died March 24 of complications related to the coronavirus at age 81. The Broadway theater veteran was a lung cancer survivor and had lived with a chronic respiratory condition. McNally's career spanned...more

Tony award-winning playwright Terrence McNally died March 24 of complications related to the coronavirus at age 81. The Broadway theater veteran was a lung cancer survivor and had lived with a chronic respiratory condition. McNally's career spanned six decades, encompassing plays, musicals and operas. It ranged from AIDS dramas "Lips Together, Teeth Apart," to domestic drama "Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune," and the stage musical adaptation of movie "The Full Monty." He was given a lifetime achievement award at the 2019 Tony Awards ceremony in New York, adding to the four he received for "Love! Valour! Compassion," "Master Class" and the books of the musical versions of "Ragtime" and "Kiss of the Spider Woman." REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz
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World-famous singer and saxophonist Manu Dibango died March 24 from a coronavirus infection at the age of 86 in France. Cameroon-born Dibango arrived in France in the early 1950s and studied jazz and saxophone in Reims, where he started playing in clubs, according to a biography on his Facebook page. In the early 1960s, his style of playing took on more African rhythms as he collaborated with Brussels-based musicians from Congo and he began touring in Africa, developing his trademark pumping saxophone rhythms. In the late 1960s, Dibango started his own band, played with a string of French musicians and in 1972 he had a major hit with "Soul Makossa," a song that brought him international success and was reinterpreted by many other artists. 

REUTERS/Luc Gnago

World-famous singer and saxophonist Manu Dibango died March 24 from a coronavirus infection at the age of 86 in France. Cameroon-born Dibango arrived in France in the early 1950s and studied jazz and saxophone in Reims, where he started playing in...more

World-famous singer and saxophonist Manu Dibango died March 24 from a coronavirus infection at the age of 86 in France. Cameroon-born Dibango arrived in France in the early 1950s and studied jazz and saxophone in Reims, where he started playing in clubs, according to a biography on his Facebook page. In the early 1960s, his style of playing took on more African rhythms as he collaborated with Brussels-based musicians from Congo and he began touring in Africa, developing his trademark pumping saxophone rhythms. In the late 1960s, Dibango started his own band, played with a string of French musicians and in 1972 he had a major hit with "Soul Makossa," a song that brought him international success and was reinterpreted by many other artists. REUTERS/Luc Gnago
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Albert Uderzo, illustrator and co-creator of famous comic series "Asterix and Obelix ," died March 24 at age 92. Uderzo and author Rene Goscinny are known as the "fathers" of the French comic series about a small village of Gauls who stand up to Roman occupiers. Uderzo was initially the illustrator of the comic strip written by Goscinny, who died in 1977. After Goscinny's death, Uderzo wrote and illustrated the series until he retired in 2009. Asterix, the mustachioed hero, who has been entertaining readers with his magic-potion exploits alongside Obelix since 1959, has become a mainstay in the publishing industry, with more than 370 million albums sold worldwide. 

REUTERS/Charles Platiau

Albert Uderzo, illustrator and co-creator of famous comic series "Asterix and Obelix ," died March 24 at age 92. Uderzo and author Rene Goscinny are known as the "fathers" of the French comic series about a small village of Gauls who stand up to...more

Albert Uderzo, illustrator and co-creator of famous comic series "Asterix and Obelix ," died March 24 at age 92. Uderzo and author Rene Goscinny are known as the "fathers" of the French comic series about a small village of Gauls who stand up to Roman occupiers. Uderzo was initially the illustrator of the comic strip written by Goscinny, who died in 1977. After Goscinny's death, Uderzo wrote and illustrated the series until he retired in 2009. Asterix, the mustachioed hero, who has been entertaining readers with his magic-potion exploits alongside Obelix since 1959, has become a mainstay in the publishing industry, with more than 370 million albums sold worldwide. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
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Grammy-winning country singer Kenny Rogers died March 20 at the age of 81. Rogers, a three-time Grammy winner and a Country Music Hall of Famer, was best known for songs like "The Gambler" and his 1983 duet with Dolly Parton "Islands in the Stream." After beginning his career in the 1950s with a jazz group, Rogers went solo in the 1970s and released his break-through single "Lucille" in 1977. 

REUTERS/Eric Henderson

Grammy-winning country singer Kenny Rogers died March 20 at the age of 81. Rogers, a three-time Grammy winner and a Country Music Hall of Famer, was best known for songs like "The Gambler" and his 1983 duet with Dolly Parton "Islands in the Stream."...more

Grammy-winning country singer Kenny Rogers died March 20 at the age of 81. Rogers, a three-time Grammy winner and a Country Music Hall of Famer, was best known for songs like "The Gambler" and his 1983 duet with Dolly Parton "Islands in the Stream." After beginning his career in the 1950s with a jazz group, Rogers went solo in the 1970s and released his break-through single "Lucille" in 1977. REUTERS/Eric Henderson
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James Lipton, the creator and host of the long-running U.S. television show "Inside the Actors Studio" died March 2 at the age of 93. Lipton hosted in-depth interviews with hundreds of Hollywood stars for more than 20 years, including Bradley Cooper, Sean Penn, Robin Williams, Paul Newman, Julia Roberts, Meryl Streep, Lauren Bacall, Steven Spielberg, Tom Hanks, Harrison Ford, Tom Cruise and many more. His interviews ended with a list of rapid-fire questions, including "If heaven exists, what would you like to hear God say when you arrive at the pearly gates?" and "What is your favorite curse word?" 

REUTERS/Danny Moloshok

James Lipton, the creator and host of the long-running U.S. television show "Inside the Actors Studio" died March 2 at the age of 93. Lipton hosted in-depth interviews with hundreds of Hollywood stars for more than 20 years, including Bradley Cooper,...more

James Lipton, the creator and host of the long-running U.S. television show "Inside the Actors Studio" died March 2 at the age of 93. Lipton hosted in-depth interviews with hundreds of Hollywood stars for more than 20 years, including Bradley Cooper, Sean Penn, Robin Williams, Paul Newman, Julia Roberts, Meryl Streep, Lauren Bacall, Steven Spielberg, Tom Hanks, Harrison Ford, Tom Cruise and many more. His interviews ended with a list of rapid-fire questions, including "If heaven exists, what would you like to hear God say when you arrive at the pearly gates?" and "What is your favorite curse word?" REUTERS/Danny Moloshok
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Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who held power for 30 years until he was ousted in 2011 in a popular uprising against corruption and autocratic rule, died February 25 at the age of 91. A partner of the West in fighting Islamists, Mubarak presided over an era of stagnation and oppression at home and was an early victim of the "Arab Spring" revolutions that swept the region. Egypt's presidency and armed forces mourned him as a hero for his role in the 1973 Arab-Israeli war and the former air force officer will be given a military funeral. He was arrested two months after being forced out by the protesters who crammed into Cairo's Tahrir Square, and then spent several years in jail and military hospitals. Mubarak was sentenced to life in prison for conspiring to murder 239 demonstrators during the 18-day revolt, but was freed in 2017 after being cleared of the charges. He was however convicted in 2015 along with his two sons of diverting public funds to upgrade family properties. They were sentenced to three years in jail. 

REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh

Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who held power for 30 years until he was ousted in 2011 in a popular uprising against corruption and autocratic rule, died February 25 at the age of 91. A partner of the West in fighting Islamists, Mubarak...more

Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who held power for 30 years until he was ousted in 2011 in a popular uprising against corruption and autocratic rule, died February 25 at the age of 91. A partner of the West in fighting Islamists, Mubarak presided over an era of stagnation and oppression at home and was an early victim of the "Arab Spring" revolutions that swept the region. Egypt's presidency and armed forces mourned him as a hero for his role in the 1973 Arab-Israeli war and the former air force officer will be given a military funeral. He was arrested two months after being forced out by the protesters who crammed into Cairo's Tahrir Square, and then spent several years in jail and military hospitals. Mubarak was sentenced to life in prison for conspiring to murder 239 demonstrators during the 18-day revolt, but was freed in 2017 after being cleared of the charges. He was however convicted in 2015 along with his two sons of diverting public funds to upgrade family properties. They were sentenced to three years in jail. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
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Katherine Johnson, the black woman whose mathematical genius took her from a behind-the-scenes job in a segregated NASA as portrayed in the 2016 film "Hidden Figures" to a key role in sending humans to the moon, died February 24 at the age of 101. She and her black colleagues were known as "computers" when that term was used not for a programmed electronic device but for a person who did computations. Johnson had a groundbreaking career of 33 years with the space agency, working on the Mercury and Apollo missions, including the first moon landing in 1969, and the early years of the space shuttle program. During the space race that began in the late 1950s, Johnson and her co-workers ran the numbers for unmanned rocket launches, test flights and airplane safety studies using pencils, slide rules and mechanical calculating machines. But they did their work in facilities separate from white workers and were required to use separate restrooms and dining facilities. Johnson was awarded a Presidential Medal of Freedom by former President Barack Obama in 2015 and in 2016 he cited her in his State of the Union Address as an example of America's spirit of discovery. 

NASA/Handout via REUTERS

Katherine Johnson, the black woman whose mathematical genius took her from a behind-the-scenes job in a segregated NASA as portrayed in the 2016 film "Hidden Figures" to a key role in sending humans to the moon, died February 24 at the age of 101....more

Katherine Johnson, the black woman whose mathematical genius took her from a behind-the-scenes job in a segregated NASA as portrayed in the 2016 film "Hidden Figures" to a key role in sending humans to the moon, died February 24 at the age of 101. She and her black colleagues were known as "computers" when that term was used not for a programmed electronic device but for a person who did computations. Johnson had a groundbreaking career of 33 years with the space agency, working on the Mercury and Apollo missions, including the first moon landing in 1969, and the early years of the space shuttle program. During the space race that began in the late 1950s, Johnson and her co-workers ran the numbers for unmanned rocket launches, test flights and airplane safety studies using pencils, slide rules and mechanical calculating machines. But they did their work in facilities separate from white workers and were required to use separate restrooms and dining facilities. Johnson was awarded a Presidential Medal of Freedom by former President Barack Obama in 2015 and in 2016 he cited her in his State of the Union Address as an example of America's spirit of discovery. NASA/Handout via REUTERS
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Kirk Douglas, the cleft-chinned movie star who fought gladiators, cowboys and boxers on the screen and the Hollywood establishment, died February 5 at the age of 103, his son Michael Douglas said. "To the world, he was a legend, an actor from the golden age of movies who lived well into his golden years, a humanitarian whose commitment to justice and the causes he believed in set a standard for all of us to aspire to," Michael said. Douglas made more than 90 movies in a career that stretched across seven decades and films such as "Spartacus" and "The Vikings" made him one of the biggest box-office stars of the 1950s and '60s. He also played a major role in breaking the Hollywood blacklist - actors, directors and writers who were shunned professionally because of links to the communist movement in the 1950s. Douglas said he was more proud of that than any film he made. Douglas had a distinctive chin, razor-sharp cheekbones and a jutting jaw - looks that he passed along to Michael - and that made him a natural for playing all manner of rugged characters. He also had a demanding nature that earned him a reputation in his prime as the actor who directed directors. 

REUTERS/Fred Prouser

Kirk Douglas, the cleft-chinned movie star who fought gladiators, cowboys and boxers on the screen and the Hollywood establishment, died February 5 at the age of 103, his son Michael Douglas said. "To the world, he was a legend, an actor from the...more

Kirk Douglas, the cleft-chinned movie star who fought gladiators, cowboys and boxers on the screen and the Hollywood establishment, died February 5 at the age of 103, his son Michael Douglas said. "To the world, he was a legend, an actor from the golden age of movies who lived well into his golden years, a humanitarian whose commitment to justice and the causes he believed in set a standard for all of us to aspire to," Michael said. Douglas made more than 90 movies in a career that stretched across seven decades and films such as "Spartacus" and "The Vikings" made him one of the biggest box-office stars of the 1950s and '60s. He also played a major role in breaking the Hollywood blacklist - actors, directors and writers who were shunned professionally because of links to the communist movement in the 1950s. Douglas said he was more proud of that than any film he made. Douglas had a distinctive chin, razor-sharp cheekbones and a jutting jaw - looks that he passed along to Michael - and that made him a natural for playing all manner of rugged characters. He also had a demanding nature that earned him a reputation in his prime as the actor who directed directors. REUTERS/Fred Prouser
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Kobe Bryant, one of the NBA's all-time greatest players, was killed at age 41 on January 26 in a helicopter crash near Los Angeles along with his 13-year-old daughter Gianna and seven others. Bryant rocketed to fame as an 18-year-old rookie drafted straight out of high school, at the time an unusual career path and spent his entire 20-year career with the Lakers before retiring in 2016. Apart from the five championship rings, he made 18 All-Star teams and in 2008 was named league MVP. Bryant called his daughter Gianna "Mambacita" after his own court nickname, "Black Mamba," confident she would follow in his footsteps and become a professional basketball player. He had been coaching her middle-school team since his retirement. 

Stephen R. Sylvanie-USA TODAY Sports

Kobe Bryant, one of the NBA's all-time greatest players, was killed at age 41 on January 26 in a helicopter crash near Los Angeles along with his 13-year-old daughter Gianna and seven others. Bryant rocketed to fame as an 18-year-old rookie drafted...more

Kobe Bryant, one of the NBA's all-time greatest players, was killed at age 41 on January 26 in a helicopter crash near Los Angeles along with his 13-year-old daughter Gianna and seven others. Bryant rocketed to fame as an 18-year-old rookie drafted straight out of high school, at the time an unusual career path and spent his entire 20-year career with the Lakers before retiring in 2016. Apart from the five championship rings, he made 18 All-Star teams and in 2008 was named league MVP. Bryant called his daughter Gianna "Mambacita" after his own court nickname, "Black Mamba," confident she would follow in his footsteps and become a professional basketball player. He had been coaching her middle-school team since his retirement. Stephen R. Sylvanie-USA TODAY Sports
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Terry Jones, one of the Monty Python comedy team and director of religious satire "Life of Brian," as well as an author, historian and poet, died January 21 at the age of 77. Jones was one of the creators of Monty Python's Flying Circus, the British TV show that rewrote the rules of comedy with surreal sketches, characters and catchphrases, in 1969. He co-directed the team's first film "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" with fellow Python Terry Gilliam, and directed the subsequent Life of Brian and "The Meaning of Life." One of Jones' best-known roles was that of Brian's mother in Life of Brian released in 1979, who screeches at worshippers from an open window: "He's not the Messiah, he's a very naughty boy." Another was the hugely obese Mr Creosote who explodes in a restaurant at the end of an enormous meal after eating a "wafer-thin mint." As well as his comedy work, Jones wrote about medieval and ancient history, including a critique of Geoffrey Chaucer's "The Knight's Tale." 

REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett

Terry Jones, one of the Monty Python comedy team and director of religious satire "Life of Brian," as well as an author, historian and poet, died January 21 at the age of 77. Jones was one of the creators of Monty Python's Flying Circus, the British...more

Terry Jones, one of the Monty Python comedy team and director of religious satire "Life of Brian," as well as an author, historian and poet, died January 21 at the age of 77. Jones was one of the creators of Monty Python's Flying Circus, the British TV show that rewrote the rules of comedy with surreal sketches, characters and catchphrases, in 1969. He co-directed the team's first film "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" with fellow Python Terry Gilliam, and directed the subsequent Life of Brian and "The Meaning of Life." One of Jones' best-known roles was that of Brian's mother in Life of Brian released in 1979, who screeches at worshippers from an open window: "He's not the Messiah, he's a very naughty boy." Another was the hugely obese Mr Creosote who explodes in a restaurant at the end of an enormous meal after eating a "wafer-thin mint." As well as his comedy work, Jones wrote about medieval and ancient history, including a critique of Geoffrey Chaucer's "The Knight's Tale." REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett
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Former Kenyan President Daniel arap Moi, who died February 4 aged 95, held power for longer than any other leader since independence and left a legacy of corruption that still haunts the East African nation today. Moi was usually pictured carrying an ivory baton and described by critics as a virtual dictator. But, for all its poverty, he left Kenya more stable than many other countries in the region emerging from colonial rule. The then vice-president came to power in 1978 when President Jomo Kenyatta died. Diplomats said an attempted coup four years later transformed him from a cautious, insecure leader into a tough autocrat. His government set up torture chambers in the basement of Nyayo House, a building in Nairobi's city center that now houses the immigration department. Thousands of activists, students and academics were held without charge in the underground cells, some of them partly filled with water. Prisoners say they were sometimes denied food and water. He won elections in 1992 and 1997 amid divided opposition. But he was booed and heckled into retirement when term limits forced him to step down in 2002 and he lived quietly for years on his sprawling estate in the Rift Valley. 

REUTERS/George Mulala

Former Kenyan President Daniel arap Moi, who died February 4 aged 95, held power for longer than any other leader since independence and left a legacy of corruption that still haunts the East African nation today. Moi was usually pictured carrying an...more

Former Kenyan President Daniel arap Moi, who died February 4 aged 95, held power for longer than any other leader since independence and left a legacy of corruption that still haunts the East African nation today. Moi was usually pictured carrying an ivory baton and described by critics as a virtual dictator. But, for all its poverty, he left Kenya more stable than many other countries in the region emerging from colonial rule. The then vice-president came to power in 1978 when President Jomo Kenyatta died. Diplomats said an attempted coup four years later transformed him from a cautious, insecure leader into a tough autocrat. His government set up torture chambers in the basement of Nyayo House, a building in Nairobi's city center that now houses the immigration department. Thousands of activists, students and academics were held without charge in the underground cells, some of them partly filled with water. Prisoners say they were sometimes denied food and water. He won elections in 1992 and 1997 amid divided opposition. But he was booed and heckled into retirement when term limits forced him to step down in 2002 and he lived quietly for years on his sprawling estate in the Rift Valley. REUTERS/George Mulala
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Neil Peart, the drummer of Rush, died January 7 at the age of 67. Among the most admired drummers in rock music, Peart was famous for his massive drum kits -- more than 40 different drums were not out of the norm -- precise playing style and onstage showmanship. He joined Rush in 1974 alongside frontman and bassist Geddy Lee and guitarist Alex Lifeson. The Canadian band played a final tour in 2015 culminating in a final show at the Forum in Los Angeles. Often used as a punchline in movies and pop culture, Rush was among the biggest bands of the last 50 years, selling millions of albums in a career that spanned 19 studio albums and multiple live collections as well as elaborate box sets.

REUTERS/Ethan Miller

Neil Peart, the drummer of Rush, died January 7 at the age of 67. Among the most admired drummers in rock music, Peart was famous for his massive drum kits -- more than 40 different drums were not out of the norm -- precise playing style and onstage...more

Neil Peart, the drummer of Rush, died January 7 at the age of 67. Among the most admired drummers in rock music, Peart was famous for his massive drum kits -- more than 40 different drums were not out of the norm -- precise playing style and onstage showmanship. He joined Rush in 1974 alongside frontman and bassist Geddy Lee and guitarist Alex Lifeson. The Canadian band played a final tour in 2015 culminating in a final show at the Forum in Los Angeles. Often used as a punchline in movies and pop culture, Rush was among the biggest bands of the last 50 years, selling millions of albums in a career that spanned 19 studio albums and multiple live collections as well as elaborate box sets. REUTERS/Ethan Miller
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Former National Basketball Association Commissioner David Stern, who oversaw explosive growth in the popularity of the game during his 30-year tenure, died January 1 at the age of 77. Under Stern, the NBA experienced extraordinary growth, with seven new franchises - including expansion to Canada in 1995 - a more than 30-fold increase in revenue, a dramatic gain in national TV exposure and the launch of the Women's National Basketball Association and NBA Development League. He also had a role in many other initiatives that helped shape the league, including a drug policy, salary-cap system and dress code. Stern's greatest accomplishment as commissioner is widely considered to be the way he transformed the NBA, once largely an unknown commodity outside the United States, into a globally televised powerhouse. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Former National Basketball Association Commissioner David Stern, who oversaw explosive growth in the popularity of the game during his 30-year tenure, died January 1 at the age of 77. Under Stern, the NBA experienced extraordinary growth, with seven...more

Former National Basketball Association Commissioner David Stern, who oversaw explosive growth in the popularity of the game during his 30-year tenure, died January 1 at the age of 77. Under Stern, the NBA experienced extraordinary growth, with seven new franchises - including expansion to Canada in 1995 - a more than 30-fold increase in revenue, a dramatic gain in national TV exposure and the launch of the Women's National Basketball Association and NBA Development League. He also had a role in many other initiatives that helped shape the league, including a drug policy, salary-cap system and dress code. Stern's greatest accomplishment as commissioner is widely considered to be the way he transformed the NBA, once largely an unknown commodity outside the United States, into a globally televised powerhouse. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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Sultan Qaboos bin Said, who died January 10 at age 79, transformed Oman during his 49-year reign from a poverty-stricken country torn by dissent into a prosperous state and an internationally trusted mediator for some of the region's thorniest issues. He became sultan in July 1970 after deposing his father in a palace coup with the aim of ending the country's isolation and using its oil revenue for modernization and development. Qaboos healed old rifts in a country long divided between a conservative tribal interior and seafaring coastal region. He became known to his countrymen as "the renaissance," investing billions of dollars of oil revenues in infrastructure and building one of the best-trained armed forces in the region. While brooking no dissent at home, Qaboos charted an independent foreign policy, not taking sides in a power struggle between Saudi Arabia and Iran, or in a Gulf dispute with Qatar. Muscat kept ties with both Tehran and Baghdad during the 1980--88 Iran--Iraq War, and with Iran and the United States after their diplomatic falling out in 1979. Oman helped to mediate secret U.S.-Iran talks in 2013 that led to an historic international nuclear pact two years later. 

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Pool via REUTERS

Sultan Qaboos bin Said, who died January 10 at age 79, transformed Oman during his 49-year reign from a poverty-stricken country torn by dissent into a prosperous state and an internationally trusted mediator for some of the region's thorniest...more

Sultan Qaboos bin Said, who died January 10 at age 79, transformed Oman during his 49-year reign from a poverty-stricken country torn by dissent into a prosperous state and an internationally trusted mediator for some of the region's thorniest issues. He became sultan in July 1970 after deposing his father in a palace coup with the aim of ending the country's isolation and using its oil revenue for modernization and development. Qaboos healed old rifts in a country long divided between a conservative tribal interior and seafaring coastal region. He became known to his countrymen as "the renaissance," investing billions of dollars of oil revenues in infrastructure and building one of the best-trained armed forces in the region. While brooking no dissent at home, Qaboos charted an independent foreign policy, not taking sides in a power struggle between Saudi Arabia and Iran, or in a Gulf dispute with Qatar. Muscat kept ties with both Tehran and Baghdad during the 1980--88 Iran--Iraq War, and with Iran and the United States after their diplomatic falling out in 1979. Oman helped to mediate secret U.S.-Iran talks in 2013 that led to an historic international nuclear pact two years later. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Pool via REUTERS
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Legendary journalist Jim Lehrer died January 23 at the age of 85. Lehrer, who co-founded "PBS NewsHour," anchored the show for almost four decades before retiring in 2011. He moderated 12 president debates -- including all of the debates in 1996 and 2000 -- more than any other journalist in U.S. history. 

REUTERS/Chip Somodevilla/Pool

Legendary journalist Jim Lehrer died January 23 at the age of 85. Lehrer, who co-founded "PBS NewsHour," anchored the show for almost four decades before retiring in 2011. He moderated 12 president debates -- including all of the debates in 1996 and...more

Legendary journalist Jim Lehrer died January 23 at the age of 85. Lehrer, who co-founded "PBS NewsHour," anchored the show for almost four decades before retiring in 2011. He moderated 12 president debates -- including all of the debates in 1996 and 2000 -- more than any other journalist in U.S. history. REUTERS/Chip Somodevilla/Pool
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Former Northern Ireland Deputy First Minister Seamus Mallon, one of the architects of the 1998 Good Friday peace agreement, died January 24 aged 83, drawing tributes from across a political divide he helped to bridge. Mallon was a major political figure in Northern Ireland during the three decades of violence between Catholic nationalists seeking union with Ireland and Protestant unionists wanting Northern Ireland to remain part of the United Kingdom. He went on to jointly head the devolved power-sharing administration that followed the peace deal and was remembered as a peacemaker who recognized, in his words, that Northern Ireland's divided communities could "live together in generosity and compassion or we can continue to die in bitter disharmony."

REUTERS/Paul McErlane

Former Northern Ireland Deputy First Minister Seamus Mallon, one of the architects of the 1998 Good Friday peace agreement, died January 24 aged 83, drawing tributes from across a political divide he helped to bridge. Mallon was a major political...more

Former Northern Ireland Deputy First Minister Seamus Mallon, one of the architects of the 1998 Good Friday peace agreement, died January 24 aged 83, drawing tributes from across a political divide he helped to bridge. Mallon was a major political figure in Northern Ireland during the three decades of violence between Catholic nationalists seeking union with Ireland and Protestant unionists wanting Northern Ireland to remain part of the United Kingdom. He went on to jointly head the devolved power-sharing administration that followed the peace deal and was remembered as a peacemaker who recognized, in his words, that Northern Ireland's divided communities could "live together in generosity and compassion or we can continue to die in bitter disharmony." REUTERS/Paul McErlane
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