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Photos of the week

A woman and a baby sit in the back of a truck as they flee Ras al Ain town, Syria October 9, 2019. Turkey pounded Kurdish militia in northeast Syria, forcing tens of thousands of people to flee and killing dozens, in a cross-border assault on U.S. allies that has turned the Washington establishment against Donald Trump. The Turkish offensive against the U.S.-allied Syrian Democratic Forces, launched days after Trump pulled U.S. troops out of the way, opens one of the biggest new fronts in years in an eight-year-old civil war that has drawn in global powers. REUTERS/Rodi Said

A woman and a baby sit in the back of a truck as they flee Ras al Ain town, Syria October 9, 2019. Turkey pounded Kurdish militia in northeast Syria, forcing tens of thousands of people to flee and killing dozens, in a cross-border assault on U.S....more

A woman and a baby sit in the back of a truck as they flee Ras al Ain town, Syria October 9, 2019. Turkey pounded Kurdish militia in northeast Syria, forcing tens of thousands of people to flee and killing dozens, in a cross-border assault on U.S. allies that has turned the Washington establishment against Donald Trump. The Turkish offensive against the U.S.-allied Syrian Democratic Forces, launched days after Trump pulled U.S. troops out of the way, opens one of the biggest new fronts in years in an eight-year-old civil war that has drawn in global powers. REUTERS/Rodi Said
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Swiss scientist Didier Queloz poses for a picture at a news conference, following the announcement he won the Nobel Prize for Physics in London, Britain, October 8, 2019. Queloz and Michel Mayor share half the prize with Canadian-American cosmologist James Peebles for revealing the wonder of the evolution of the universe and discovering planets orbiting distant suns. Mayor and Queloz announced the first discovery of a planet outside our own solar system, a so-called "exoplanet," in 1995. REUTERS/Simon Dawson

Swiss scientist Didier Queloz poses for a picture at a news conference, following the announcement he won the Nobel Prize for Physics in London, Britain, October 8, 2019. Queloz and Michel Mayor share half the prize with Canadian-American cosmologist...more

Swiss scientist Didier Queloz poses for a picture at a news conference, following the announcement he won the Nobel Prize for Physics in London, Britain, October 8, 2019. Queloz and Michel Mayor share half the prize with Canadian-American cosmologist James Peebles for revealing the wonder of the evolution of the universe and discovering planets orbiting distant suns. Mayor and Queloz announced the first discovery of a planet outside our own solar system, a so-called "exoplanet," in 1995. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
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A police vehicle burns during a protest against Ecuador President Lenin Moreno's austerity measures, including the end of fuel subsidies, in Quito, Ecuador, October 7, 2019. Indigenous people at the heart of the country's biggest protests in more than a decade are vowing to stay on the streets unless Moreno repeals austerity measures linked to securing a $4.2 billion International Monetary Fund loan. The unrest is the latest flashpoint in Latin America over unpopular structural economic reforms. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

A police vehicle burns during a protest against Ecuador President Lenin Moreno's austerity measures, including the end of fuel subsidies, in Quito, Ecuador, October 7, 2019. Indigenous people at the heart of the country's biggest protests in more...more

A police vehicle burns during a protest against Ecuador President Lenin Moreno's austerity measures, including the end of fuel subsidies, in Quito, Ecuador, October 7, 2019. Indigenous people at the heart of the country's biggest protests in more than a decade are vowing to stay on the streets unless Moreno repeals austerity measures linked to securing a $4.2 billion International Monetary Fund loan. The unrest is the latest flashpoint in Latin America over unpopular structural economic reforms. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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A police officer detains Phil Kingston, 83, who spray painted a stencil slogan on the wall of the building housing the Treasury during an Extinction Rebellion protest in London, Britain October 7, 2019. Kingston, part of a Christian coalition of climate activists, said he had been arrested twice since the latest protests started this week - but kept returning on behalf of his grandchildren. "This movement is going to grow. We have to reduce the vulnerability of our children and grandchildren," he said. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls

A police officer detains Phil Kingston, 83, who spray painted a stencil slogan on the wall of the building housing the Treasury during an Extinction Rebellion protest in London, Britain October 7, 2019. Kingston, part of a Christian coalition of...more

A police officer detains Phil Kingston, 83, who spray painted a stencil slogan on the wall of the building housing the Treasury during an Extinction Rebellion protest in London, Britain October 7, 2019. Kingston, part of a Christian coalition of climate activists, said he had been arrested twice since the latest protests started this week - but kept returning on behalf of his grandchildren. "This movement is going to grow. We have to reduce the vulnerability of our children and grandchildren," he said. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
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Anti-government protesters wear masks during a demonstration at Causeway Bay district, in Hong Kong, China October 6, 2019. Hong Kong's leader Carrie Lam introduced emergency laws on October 4, banning face masks that protesters use to shield their identities, in an effort to quell unrest. But the move sparked some of the worst violence since protests started. Many Hong Kongers fear the emergency laws could be expanded and further erode their rights. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

Anti-government protesters wear masks during a demonstration at Causeway Bay district, in Hong Kong, China October 6, 2019. Hong Kong's leader Carrie Lam introduced emergency laws on October 4, banning face masks that protesters use to shield their...more

Anti-government protesters wear masks during a demonstration at Causeway Bay district, in Hong Kong, China October 6, 2019. Hong Kong's leader Carrie Lam introduced emergency laws on October 4, banning face masks that protesters use to shield their identities, in an effort to quell unrest. But the move sparked some of the worst violence since protests started. Many Hong Kongers fear the emergency laws could be expanded and further erode their rights. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
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Supporters react as President Donald Trump walks from Marine One to the White House in Washington, October 3, 2019. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Supporters react as President Donald Trump walks from Marine One to the White House in Washington, October 3, 2019. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Supporters react as President Donald Trump walks from Marine One to the White House in Washington, October 3, 2019. REUTERS/Tom Brenner
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Ravil Izhmukhametov, 9, walks outside Sibilyakovo, Omsk region, Russia. The boy is the last student in the once bustling school in this dying Russian village, where the population has shrunk to 39. When his teacher retires next year, the school will close, and Izhmukhametov will have to travel to the neighboring village for lessons: a 30-minute boat journey across the choppy Irtysh river followed by a 20-minute ride on the school bus. Picture taken September 1, 2019. REUTERS/Alexey Malgavko

Ravil Izhmukhametov, 9, walks outside Sibilyakovo, Omsk region, Russia. The boy is the last student in the once bustling school in this dying Russian village, where the population has shrunk to 39. When his teacher retires next year, the school will...more

Ravil Izhmukhametov, 9, walks outside Sibilyakovo, Omsk region, Russia. The boy is the last student in the once bustling school in this dying Russian village, where the population has shrunk to 39. When his teacher retires next year, the school will close, and Izhmukhametov will have to travel to the neighboring village for lessons: a 30-minute boat journey across the choppy Irtysh river followed by a 20-minute ride on the school bus. Picture taken September 1, 2019. REUTERS/Alexey Malgavko
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Indian Air Force soldiers march as advanced light helicopters fly during Indian Air Force Day celebrations at the Hindon Air Force Station on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, October 8, 2019. REUTERS/Anushree Fadnavis

Indian Air Force soldiers march as advanced light helicopters fly during Indian Air Force Day celebrations at the Hindon Air Force Station on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, October 8, 2019. REUTERS/Anushree Fadnavis

Indian Air Force soldiers march as advanced light helicopters fly during Indian Air Force Day celebrations at the Hindon Air Force Station on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, October 8, 2019. REUTERS/Anushree Fadnavis
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A dead red-tailed monkey is hung by its tail above the ground, in order to keep it away from ants, in the forest near the city of Mbandaka, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Bushmeat hunters are emptying Central Africa's forests at a high rate, researchers say. A growing appetite for wild meat in cities has ramped up the scale of hunting. Research shows around 6 million tonnes of bushmeat are sourced annually from the Congo Basin, whose forest spans across six countries and is second in size only to the Amazon. Picture taken April 5, 2019. REUTERS/Thomas Nicolon

A dead red-tailed monkey is hung by its tail above the ground, in order to keep it away from ants, in the forest near the city of Mbandaka, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Bushmeat hunters are emptying Central Africa's forests at a high rate,...more

A dead red-tailed monkey is hung by its tail above the ground, in order to keep it away from ants, in the forest near the city of Mbandaka, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Bushmeat hunters are emptying Central Africa's forests at a high rate, researchers say. A growing appetite for wild meat in cities has ramped up the scale of hunting. Research shows around 6 million tonnes of bushmeat are sourced annually from the Congo Basin, whose forest spans across six countries and is second in size only to the Amazon. Picture taken April 5, 2019. REUTERS/Thomas Nicolon
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Police motorcycles lead a procession of the casket of shot New York City Police Department officer Brian Mulkeen from his funeral service at the Sacred Heart Church in Monroe, New York, October 4, 2019. Mulkeen, 33, was shot and killed by "friendly fire" on September 29 while investigating gang activity in the Bronx and a suspect also died in the incident, police said. He was the second New York police officer shot dead by colleagues in the line of duty this year. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Police motorcycles lead a procession of the casket of shot New York City Police Department officer Brian Mulkeen from his funeral service at the Sacred Heart Church in Monroe, New York, October 4, 2019. Mulkeen, 33, was shot and killed by "friendly...more

Police motorcycles lead a procession of the casket of shot New York City Police Department officer Brian Mulkeen from his funeral service at the Sacred Heart Church in Monroe, New York, October 4, 2019. Mulkeen, 33, was shot and killed by "friendly fire" on September 29 while investigating gang activity in the Bronx and a suspect also died in the incident, police said. He was the second New York police officer shot dead by colleagues in the line of duty this year. REUTERS/Mike Segar
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Ramlo Ali Noor puts shoes on her daughter Sumayo at her apartment in Columbus, Ohio. The Somali refugee had been waiting since applying to the U.S. government in 2015 to bring over her three boys from Uganda, but their cases faced hold-ups in refugee processing under the Trump administration. On Sept. 22, the youngest of the three teenagers - 16-year-old Abdiaziz - died suddenly from a brain infection. Now Noor, 37, fears the window for her two surviving sons to make it into the United States is shrinking. The U.S. government plans to slash the refugee ceiling to 18,000, its lowest since the modern refugee program began in 1980. More than half the places for refugees in the 2020 fiscal year are reserved for Iraqis, Central Americans and religious minorities, leaving only 7,500 for everyone else, according to a White House proposal. Picture taken September 27, 2019. REUTERS/Maddie McGarvey

Ramlo Ali Noor puts shoes on her daughter Sumayo at her apartment in Columbus, Ohio. The Somali refugee had been waiting since applying to the U.S. government in 2015 to bring over her three boys from Uganda, but their cases faced hold-ups in refugee...more

Ramlo Ali Noor puts shoes on her daughter Sumayo at her apartment in Columbus, Ohio. The Somali refugee had been waiting since applying to the U.S. government in 2015 to bring over her three boys from Uganda, but their cases faced hold-ups in refugee processing under the Trump administration. On Sept. 22, the youngest of the three teenagers - 16-year-old Abdiaziz - died suddenly from a brain infection. Now Noor, 37, fears the window for her two surviving sons to make it into the United States is shrinking. The U.S. government plans to slash the refugee ceiling to 18,000, its lowest since the modern refugee program began in 1980. More than half the places for refugees in the 2020 fiscal year are reserved for Iraqis, Central Americans and religious minorities, leaving only 7,500 for everyone else, according to a White House proposal. Picture taken September 27, 2019. REUTERS/Maddie McGarvey
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Refugees and migrants arrive on a passenger ferry from the island of Lesbos at the port of Piraeus, Greece, October 7, 2019. The government has started moving asylum-seekers to mainland camps in a bid to ease overcrowding at Moria camp on Lesbos, and plans to transfer at least 3,000 people by the end of October, a government official said. REUTERS/Giorgos Moutafis

Refugees and migrants arrive on a passenger ferry from the island of Lesbos at the port of Piraeus, Greece, October 7, 2019. The government has started moving asylum-seekers to mainland camps in a bid to ease overcrowding at Moria camp on Lesbos, and...more

Refugees and migrants arrive on a passenger ferry from the island of Lesbos at the port of Piraeus, Greece, October 7, 2019. The government has started moving asylum-seekers to mainland camps in a bid to ease overcrowding at Moria camp on Lesbos, and plans to transfer at least 3,000 people by the end of October, a government official said. REUTERS/Giorgos Moutafis
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A demonstrator runs between burning tires during nationwide anti-government protests in Baghdad, Iraq October 3, 2019. A week of protests over corruption and unemployment has led to the deaths of at least 110 people and wounded more than 6,000 since security forces started cracking down. REUTERS/Wissm al-Okili

A demonstrator runs between burning tires during nationwide anti-government protests in Baghdad, Iraq October 3, 2019. A week of protests over corruption and unemployment has led to the deaths of at least 110 people and wounded more than 6,000 since...more

A demonstrator runs between burning tires during nationwide anti-government protests in Baghdad, Iraq October 3, 2019. A week of protests over corruption and unemployment has led to the deaths of at least 110 people and wounded more than 6,000 since security forces started cracking down. REUTERS/Wissm al-Okili
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Frank Lee, a striking UAW auto worker from the General Motors assembly plant in Bowling Green, calls a bill collector from his home in Auburn, Kentucky. The financial pressure of the weeks-long strike has mounted for union members like Lee. "Until yesterday, I was negative in my bank account," he said. "I called the bank to try and stop an insurance payment from coming out. I failed to do that; it was too late." Adding to the difficulty of his situation, union regulations prohibit Lee from seeking outside employment while on strike. If he finds another job, or supplements the weekly $250 strike pay, he will lose the benefits with the union. Picture taken October 1, 2019. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Frank Lee, a striking UAW auto worker from the General Motors assembly plant in Bowling Green, calls a bill collector from his home in Auburn, Kentucky. The financial pressure of the weeks-long strike has mounted for union members like Lee. "Until...more

Frank Lee, a striking UAW auto worker from the General Motors assembly plant in Bowling Green, calls a bill collector from his home in Auburn, Kentucky. The financial pressure of the weeks-long strike has mounted for union members like Lee. "Until yesterday, I was negative in my bank account," he said. "I called the bank to try and stop an insurance payment from coming out. I failed to do that; it was too late." Adding to the difficulty of his situation, union regulations prohibit Lee from seeking outside employment while on strike. If he finds another job, or supplements the weekly $250 strike pay, he will lose the benefits with the union. Picture taken October 1, 2019. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
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A gunman fires during a shooting in Halle, Germany, October 9, 2019. The gunman suspected of attacking a German synagogue and killing two people nearby wanted to commit a massacre and incite others by live-streaming his deadly rampage, Germany's federal prosecutor said. The man, Stephan B., modeled the attack on a shooting spree at New Zealand mosques earlier this year in which 51 people were killed. He wanted to kill as many people as possible in the synagogue in the eastern city of Halle, the prosecutor said. Dozens of people were at the synagogue on Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the Jewish year, when the gunman tried to blast his way in - only to fail to breach the solid locked gates. ATV STUDIO HALLE/REUTERS TV via REUTERS

A gunman fires during a shooting in Halle, Germany, October 9, 2019. The gunman suspected of attacking a German synagogue and killing two people nearby wanted to commit a massacre and incite others by live-streaming his deadly rampage, Germany's...more

A gunman fires during a shooting in Halle, Germany, October 9, 2019. The gunman suspected of attacking a German synagogue and killing two people nearby wanted to commit a massacre and incite others by live-streaming his deadly rampage, Germany's federal prosecutor said. The man, Stephan B., modeled the attack on a shooting spree at New Zealand mosques earlier this year in which 51 people were killed. He wanted to kill as many people as possible in the synagogue in the eastern city of Halle, the prosecutor said. Dozens of people were at the synagogue on Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the Jewish year, when the gunman tried to blast his way in - only to fail to breach the solid locked gates. ATV STUDIO HALLE/REUTERS TV via REUTERS
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Victor, a 9-year-old white-tailed eagle equipped with a 360 camera, flies over glaciers and mountains in Chamonix, France, in this still image taken from a video released October 8, 2019. The bird and its handlers are preparing for the Alpine Eagle Race, a collaboration through the eyes of the eagle, a photographer and a scientist to fly over five glaciers in five European countries in five days, to raise awareness of global warming. Eagle Wings Foundation/Chopard/Handout via REUTERS

Victor, a 9-year-old white-tailed eagle equipped with a 360 camera, flies over glaciers and mountains in Chamonix, France, in this still image taken from a video released October 8, 2019. The bird and its handlers are preparing for the Alpine Eagle...more

Victor, a 9-year-old white-tailed eagle equipped with a 360 camera, flies over glaciers and mountains in Chamonix, France, in this still image taken from a video released October 8, 2019. The bird and its handlers are preparing for the Alpine Eagle Race, a collaboration through the eyes of the eagle, a photographer and a scientist to fly over five glaciers in five European countries in five days, to raise awareness of global warming. Eagle Wings Foundation/Chopard/Handout via REUTERS
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Extinction Rebellion protestors pose outside Government Buildings on budget day in Dublin, Ireland October 8, 2019. Thousands of climate-change protesters around the world launched two weeks of peaceful civil disobedience to demand immediate action to cut carbon emissions and avert an ecological disaster. REUTERS/Lorraine O'Sullivan

Extinction Rebellion protestors pose outside Government Buildings on budget day in Dublin, Ireland October 8, 2019. Thousands of climate-change protesters around the world launched two weeks of peaceful civil disobedience to demand immediate action...more

Extinction Rebellion protestors pose outside Government Buildings on budget day in Dublin, Ireland October 8, 2019. Thousands of climate-change protesters around the world launched two weeks of peaceful civil disobedience to demand immediate action to cut carbon emissions and avert an ecological disaster. REUTERS/Lorraine O'Sullivan
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Britain's Toby Harries and Rabah Yousif, Italy's Vladimir Aceti and Matteo Galvan and France's Christopher Naliali and Thomas Jordier race during the men's 4x400 meters relay final at the World Athletics Championships in Doha, Qatar, October 6, 2019. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

Britain's Toby Harries and Rabah Yousif, Italy's Vladimir Aceti and Matteo Galvan and France's Christopher Naliali and Thomas Jordier race during the men's 4x400 meters relay final at the World Athletics Championships in Doha, Qatar, October 6, 2019....more

Britain's Toby Harries and Rabah Yousif, Italy's Vladimir Aceti and Matteo Galvan and France's Christopher Naliali and Thomas Jordier race during the men's 4x400 meters relay final at the World Athletics Championships in Doha, Qatar, October 6, 2019. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch
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Nidhi Bhattacharjee, 5, dressed as a Kumari, yawns as she is worshipped by Hindu priests (unseen) as part of a ritual during the Durga Puja festival celebrations in Agartala, India, October 6, 2019. REUTERS/Jayanta Dey

Nidhi Bhattacharjee, 5, dressed as a Kumari, yawns as she is worshipped by Hindu priests (unseen) as part of a ritual during the Durga Puja festival celebrations in Agartala, India, October 6, 2019. REUTERS/Jayanta Dey

Nidhi Bhattacharjee, 5, dressed as a Kumari, yawns as she is worshipped by Hindu priests (unseen) as part of a ritual during the Durga Puja festival celebrations in Agartala, India, October 6, 2019. REUTERS/Jayanta Dey
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Irma Rivera, an asylum seeker from Honduras, spends time with her children Jesus and Suany upon getting home from work in Fort Worth, Texas. After walking thousands of miles north through Guatemala and Mexico in a migrant caravan, the three asked for U.S. asylum in May 2018 at the port of entry near San Diego, California. They spent three weeks in U.S. custody, then convinced an immigration official they had a "credible fear" of returning home. They were released pending court hearings to decide their fate - a process that could take years. Rivera arrived in the United States with straightforward expectations. "I thought the children would go to school, and I'd work, and I'd get settled," she said. "But it's been very difficult here." Picture taken June 6, 2019. REUTERS/Loren Elliott

Irma Rivera, an asylum seeker from Honduras, spends time with her children Jesus and Suany upon getting home from work in Fort Worth, Texas. After walking thousands of miles north through Guatemala and Mexico in a migrant caravan, the three asked for...more

Irma Rivera, an asylum seeker from Honduras, spends time with her children Jesus and Suany upon getting home from work in Fort Worth, Texas. After walking thousands of miles north through Guatemala and Mexico in a migrant caravan, the three asked for U.S. asylum in May 2018 at the port of entry near San Diego, California. They spent three weeks in U.S. custody, then convinced an immigration official they had a "credible fear" of returning home. They were released pending court hearings to decide their fate - a process that could take years. Rivera arrived in the United States with straightforward expectations. "I thought the children would go to school, and I'd work, and I'd get settled," she said. "But it's been very difficult here." Picture taken June 6, 2019. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
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