Edition:
United Kingdom
Pictures | Tue Jul 31, 2018 | 5:55pm BST

Venezuela struggles to keep the lights on

Americo Fernandez uses a candle to illuminate the kitchen at his home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. Once oil wealthy, Venezuela's largest state is now struggling to keep the lights on.

REUTERS/Marco Bello

Americo Fernandez uses a candle to illuminate the kitchen at his home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. Once oil wealthy, Venezuela's largest state is now struggling to keep the lights on. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Americo Fernandez uses a candle to illuminate the kitchen at his home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. Once oil wealthy, Venezuela's largest state is now struggling to keep the lights on. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
1 / 23
Cindy Morales cries at the entrance of her home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. Across Maracaibo, the capital of Venezuela's largest state, residents unplug refrigerators to guard against power surges. Many only buy food they will consume the same day. Others regularly sleep outside.


REUTERS/Marco Bello

Cindy Morales cries at the entrance of her home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. Across Maracaibo, the capital of Venezuela's largest state, residents unplug refrigerators to guard against power surges. Many only buy food they will...more

Cindy Morales cries at the entrance of her home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. Across Maracaibo, the capital of Venezuela's largest state, residents unplug refrigerators to guard against power surges. Many only buy food they will consume the same day. Others regularly sleep outside. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
2 / 23
People use light from phones while they help Olimpia Mora, who is in a wheelchair, to go out from a building during a blackout in Caracas, July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

People use light from phones while they help Olimpia Mora, who is in a wheelchair, to go out from a building during a blackout in Caracas, July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

People use light from phones while they help Olimpia Mora, who is in a wheelchair, to go out from a building during a blackout in Caracas, July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Close
3 / 23
Ismael, son of Cindy Morales, lays down in a mattress at the porch of their home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. 


REUTERS/Marco Bello

Ismael, son of Cindy Morales, lays down in a mattress at the porch of their home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Ismael, son of Cindy Morales, lays down in a mattress at the porch of their home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
4 / 23
People block a street in protest during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. The rolling blackouts in the state of Zulia pile more misery on Venezuelans living under a fifth year of an economic crisis that has sparked malnutrition, hyperinflation and mass emigration. 

REUTERS/Marco Bello

People block a street in protest during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. The rolling blackouts in the state of Zulia pile more misery on Venezuelans living under a fifth year of an economic crisis that has sparked malnutrition, hyperinflation...more

People block a street in protest during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. The rolling blackouts in the state of Zulia pile more misery on Venezuelans living under a fifth year of an economic crisis that has sparked malnutrition, hyperinflation and mass emigration. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
5 / 23
People use light from phones while they walk on the staircase of a building during a blackout in Caracas, July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

People use light from phones while they walk on the staircase of a building during a blackout in Caracas, July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

People use light from phones while they walk on the staircase of a building during a blackout in Caracas, July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Close
6 / 23
A private security guard stands close to the entrance of a parking garage during a blackout in Caracas, July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

A private security guard stands close to the entrance of a parking garage during a blackout in Caracas, July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

A private security guard stands close to the entrance of a parking garage during a blackout in Caracas, July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Close
7 / 23
Judith Palmar mops her home in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. Zulia, the historic heart of Venezuela's energy industry that was for decades known for opulent oil wealth, has been plunged into darkness for several hours a day since March, sometimes leaving its 3.7 million residents with no electricity for up to 24 hours.  

REUTERS/Marco Bello

Judith Palmar mops her home in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. Zulia, the historic heart of Venezuela's energy industry that was for decades known for opulent oil wealth, has been plunged into darkness for several hours a day since March, sometimes leaving...more

Judith Palmar mops her home in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. Zulia, the historic heart of Venezuela's energy industry that was for decades known for opulent oil wealth, has been plunged into darkness for several hours a day since March, sometimes leaving its 3.7 million residents with no electricity for up to 24 hours. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
8 / 23
People speak in front of a restaurant at a shopping mall as they wait for the power to be restored during a blackout in Caracas, July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

People speak in front of a restaurant at a shopping mall as they wait for the power to be restored during a blackout in Caracas, July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

People speak in front of a restaurant at a shopping mall as they wait for the power to be restored during a blackout in Caracas, July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Close
9 / 23
A CLAP box, a Venezuelan government handout of basic food supplies, is seen amid garbage dump along a canal in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. In the past, Zulians considered themselves living in a 'Venezuelan Texas', rich from oil and with an identity proudly distinct from the rest of the country. Oil workers could often be seen driving new cars and flew by private jet to the Dutch Caribbean territory of Curacao to gamble their earnings in their casinos.   



REUTERS/Marco Bello

A CLAP box, a Venezuelan government handout of basic food supplies, is seen amid garbage dump along a canal in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. In the past, Zulians considered themselves living in a 'Venezuelan Texas', rich from oil and with an identity...more

A CLAP box, a Venezuelan government handout of basic food supplies, is seen amid garbage dump along a canal in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. In the past, Zulians considered themselves living in a 'Venezuelan Texas', rich from oil and with an identity proudly distinct from the rest of the country. Oil workers could often be seen driving new cars and flew by private jet to the Dutch Caribbean territory of Curacao to gamble their earnings in their casinos. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
10 / 23
People wait for public transportation in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. Once famous for its all-night parties, now Maracaibo is often a sea of darkness at night due to blackouts.

REUTERS/Marco Bello

People wait for public transportation in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. Once famous for its all-night parties, now Maracaibo is often a sea of darkness at night due to blackouts. REUTERS/Marco Bello

People wait for public transportation in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. Once famous for its all-night parties, now Maracaibo is often a sea of darkness at night due to blackouts. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
11 / 23
People wait at the emergency area of a clinic during a blackout in Caracas, July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

People wait at the emergency area of a clinic during a blackout in Caracas, July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

People wait at the emergency area of a clinic during a blackout in Caracas, July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
12 / 23
Elizabeth Altuve poses for a photo at the occupied building where she lives in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. 

REUTERS/Marco Bello

Elizabeth Altuve poses for a photo at the occupied building where she lives in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Elizabeth Altuve poses for a photo at the occupied building where she lives in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
13 / 23
A main highway is seen during rush hour in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. Zulia used to produce 70 percent of Venezuela's milk and meat but without power to milk cows and keep meat from spoiling, the state's production has fallen nearly in half, according to Venezuela's National Federation of Ranchers (Fedenaga).


REUTERS/Marco Bello

A main highway is seen during rush hour in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. Zulia used to produce 70 percent of Venezuela's milk and meat but without power to milk cows and keep meat from spoiling, the state's production has fallen nearly in half, according...more

A main highway is seen during rush hour in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. Zulia used to produce 70 percent of Venezuela's milk and meat but without power to milk cows and keep meat from spoiling, the state's production has fallen nearly in half, according to Venezuela's National Federation of Ranchers (Fedenaga). REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
14 / 23
Bread for sale are seen in a shelf of the bakery of Annie Salazar at Rafael Urdaneta slum in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. 



REUTERS/Marco Bello

Bread for sale are seen in a shelf of the bakery of Annie Salazar at Rafael Urdaneta slum in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Bread for sale are seen in a shelf of the bakery of Annie Salazar at Rafael Urdaneta slum in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
15 / 23
Cindy Morales stands at the door to the backyard at her home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Cindy Morales stands at the door to the backyard at her home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Cindy Morales stands at the door to the backyard at her home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
16 / 23
Judith Palmar holds her mother Sibilina Caro hand after feeding her at their home in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. When the lights do go out, Palmar wheels her paralyzed mother outside because the house becomes intolerably hot. One power cut damaged an air conditioning unit, which Palmar cannot afford to replace on her pension of about $1.50 a month due to inflation, estimated by the opposition-run Congress in June at 46,000 percent a year.
  
REUTERS/Marco Bello

Judith Palmar holds her mother Sibilina Caro hand after feeding her at their home in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. When the lights do go out, Palmar wheels her paralyzed mother outside because the house becomes intolerably hot. One power cut damaged an...more

Judith Palmar holds her mother Sibilina Caro hand after feeding her at their home in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. When the lights do go out, Palmar wheels her paralyzed mother outside because the house becomes intolerably hot. One power cut damaged an air conditioning unit, which Palmar cannot afford to replace on her pension of about $1.50 a month due to inflation, estimated by the opposition-run Congress in June at 46,000 percent a year. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
17 / 23
Electrical posts and power lines are seen at sunset during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Electrical posts and power lines are seen at sunset during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Electrical posts and power lines are seen at sunset during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
18 / 23
Matilde Balza takes a recipient out of the refrigerator her home at Rafael Urdaneta slum in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. 

REUTERS/Marco Bello

Matilde Balza takes a recipient out of the refrigerator her home at Rafael Urdaneta slum in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Matilde Balza takes a recipient out of the refrigerator her home at Rafael Urdaneta slum in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
19 / 23
Cindy Morales pulls a mattress out of a room at her home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Cindy Morales pulls a mattress out of a room at her home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Cindy Morales pulls a mattress out of a room at her home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
20 / 23
Ismael, son of Cindy Morales, lays down in a mattress at the porch of their home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Ismael, son of Cindy Morales, lays down in a mattress at the porch of their home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Ismael, son of Cindy Morales, lays down in a mattress at the porch of their home during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
21 / 23
Electrical posts and power lines are seen at sunset during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018.    



REUTERS/Marco Bello

Electrical posts and power lines are seen at sunset during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Electrical posts and power lines are seen at sunset during a blackout in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
22 / 23
Elizabeth Altuve climbs the stairs at the occupied building where she lives in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Elizabeth Altuve climbs the stairs at the occupied building where she lives in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Elizabeth Altuve climbs the stairs at the occupied building where she lives in Maracaibo, July 26, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Close
23 / 23

Next Slideshows

Monsoon rains lash India

Heavy rains in India as monsoon season gets underway.

31 Jul 2018

North Korea's eclectic architecture

Futuristic skyscrapers meet socialist monuments in the reclusive state.

30 Jul 2018

Zimbabwe votes in first post-Mugabe poll

Zimbabweans vote in the first election since former president Robert Mugabe was ousted in a de facto coup, with allegations of voter suppression raising fears...

30 Jul 2018

North Korea returns remains of U.S. soldiers killed in Korean War

North Korea transfers 55 small, flag-draped cases carrying the suspected remains of U.S. soldiers killed in the Korean War, a first step in implementing an...

30 Jul 2018

MORE IN PICTURES

Karl Lagerfeld's art of the runway

Karl Lagerfeld's art of the runway

Grandiose catwalk concepts orchestrated by Chanel's late artistic director Karl Lagerfeld.

Editors Choice Pictures

Editors Choice Pictures

Our top photos from the last 24 hours.

Crossing the Rio Grande

Crossing the Rio Grande

Migrants cross the Rio Grande on their way north to the United States, as President Donald Trump invokes emergency powers to help build the border wall that was his signature 2016 campaign promise.

Lantern Festival

Lantern Festival

Floating lanterns and fireworks mark the end of Lunar New Year festivities across Asia.

London Fashion Week

London Fashion Week

Backstage and collection highlights from London.

Meghan's royal pregnancy

Meghan's royal pregnancy

The 37-year-old Duchess of Sussex, who is expecting her first child with Prince Harry in the spring, is in New York City reportedly for a baby shower.

Jewish graves desecrated in France

Jewish graves desecrated in France

Vandals defaced around 90 graves in a Jewish cemetery in eastern France with swastikas and anti-Semitic slogans shortly before planned marches nationwide against a surge in anti-Semitic attacks.

Honoring Buddha and his teachings

Honoring Buddha and his teachings

Buddhists monks across Southeast Asia celebrate Buddha and his teachings on Makha Bucha Day.

Karl Lagerfeld: 1933 - 2019

Karl Lagerfeld: 1933 - 2019

The artistic director at Chanel and an icon of the global fashion industry for over half a century has died at age 85.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast