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Pictures | Wed Aug 22, 2018 | 1:35pm BST

Venezuelans going to Brazil to give birth

Expecting Venezuelan women are leaving their country due to lack of prenatal care, medicine and diapers and giving birth across the border in Brazil, where three Venezuelan babies are born every day.

REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Expecting Venezuelan women are leaving their country due to lack of prenatal care, medicine and diapers and giving birth across the border in Brazil, where three Venezuelan babies are born every day. REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Expecting Venezuelan women are leaving their country due to lack of prenatal care, medicine and diapers and giving birth across the border in Brazil, where three Venezuelan babies are born every day. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
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"My baby would have died if I had stayed. There was no food or medicine, no doctors," said Maria Teresa Lopez as she fed her daughter Fabiola, who was born on Monday night by caesarian section in the maternity hospital of Boa Vista, the capital of Brazil's Roraima border state. Lopez, 20, hitched 500 miles from her home in the Orinoco river delta to the Brazilian border five months ago. 

 

 REUTERS/Nacho Doce

"My baby would have died if I had stayed. There was no food or medicine, no doctors," said Maria Teresa Lopez as she fed her daughter Fabiola, who was born on Monday night by caesarian section in the maternity hospital of Boa Vista, the capital of...more

"My baby would have died if I had stayed. There was no food or medicine, no doctors," said Maria Teresa Lopez as she fed her daughter Fabiola, who was born on Monday night by caesarian section in the maternity hospital of Boa Vista, the capital of Brazil's Roraima border state. Lopez, 20, hitched 500 miles from her home in the Orinoco river delta to the Brazilian border five months ago. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
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Carmen Jimenez, 33, who arrived from Ciudad Bolivar eight months pregnant and gave birth in the Boa Vista hospital, said she was amazed to see so many Venezuelan mothers there. "I won't go back to Venezuela until there is food and medicine, and the streets are safe again," she said holding her 4-day-old daughter, Amalia. 


REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Carmen Jimenez, 33, who arrived from Ciudad Bolivar eight months pregnant and gave birth in the Boa Vista hospital, said she was amazed to see so many Venezuelan mothers there. "I won't go back to Venezuela until there is food and medicine, and the...more

Carmen Jimenez, 33, who arrived from Ciudad Bolivar eight months pregnant and gave birth in the Boa Vista hospital, said she was amazed to see so many Venezuelan mothers there. "I won't go back to Venezuela until there is food and medicine, and the streets are safe again," she said holding her 4-day-old daughter, Amalia. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
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Jackeline, 24, a Venezuelan from Bolivar state, holds her four-day-old baby Sofia at a maternity hospital in Boa Vista, Brazil. 
  

REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Jackeline, 24, a Venezuelan from Bolivar state, holds her four-day-old baby Sofia at a maternity hospital in Boa Vista, Brazil. REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Jackeline, 24, a Venezuelan from Bolivar state, holds her four-day-old baby Sofia at a maternity hospital in Boa Vista, Brazil. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
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Lismaris, 21, a Venezuelan from Monagas state, holds her three-day-old baby Cecilia. Births of Venezuelan babies at the Boa Vista maternity hospital surged to 566 last year and 571 in the first half of 2018, from 288 in 2016 when the flow of Venezuelan refugees began, the Roraima health department said. There were no births in 2015, it said.


REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Lismaris, 21, a Venezuelan from Monagas state, holds her three-day-old baby Cecilia. Births of Venezuelan babies at the Boa Vista maternity hospital surged to 566 last year and 571 in the first half of 2018, from 288 in 2016 when the flow of...more

Lismaris, 21, a Venezuelan from Monagas state, holds her three-day-old baby Cecilia. Births of Venezuelan babies at the Boa Vista maternity hospital surged to 566 last year and 571 in the first half of 2018, from 288 in 2016 when the flow of Venezuelan refugees began, the Roraima health department said. There were no births in 2015, it said. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
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Jasmilfer, 23, a Venezuelan from Monagas state, holds her five-day-old baby Arjunea. 

REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Jasmilfer, 23, a Venezuelan from Monagas state, holds her five-day-old baby Arjunea. REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Jasmilfer, 23, a Venezuelan from Monagas state, holds her five-day-old baby Arjunea. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
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Marisol, 44, a Venezuelan from Monagas state, holds her two-day-old baby Amalia. 

REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Marisol, 44, a Venezuelan from Monagas state, holds her two-day-old baby Amalia. REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Marisol, 44, a Venezuelan from Monagas state, holds her two-day-old baby Amalia. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
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Irene, 23, a Venezuelan woman from Santa Elena city, holds her six-day-old baby Ashlei. 

REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Irene, 23, a Venezuelan woman from Santa Elena city, holds her six-day-old baby Ashlei. REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Irene, 23, a Venezuelan woman from Santa Elena city, holds her six-day-old baby Ashlei. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
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Cecilia, a Venezuelan woman holds her baby. REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Cecilia, a Venezuelan woman holds her baby. REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Cecilia, a Venezuelan woman holds her baby. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
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Lopez, a Warao Indian of the Orinoco delta, said she would only return to pick up her first daughter, who remained behind with her grandmother because she was too young for the arduous journey to the border. "There is nothing left for us there," she said. "I did not get an ultrasound until I got to Brazil and it was free. I want to stay."

 REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Lopez, a Warao Indian of the Orinoco delta, said she would only return to pick up her first daughter, who remained behind with her grandmother because she was too young for the arduous journey to the border. "There is nothing left for us there," she...more

Lopez, a Warao Indian of the Orinoco delta, said she would only return to pick up her first daughter, who remained behind with her grandmother because she was too young for the arduous journey to the border. "There is nothing left for us there," she said. "I did not get an ultrasound until I got to Brazil and it was free. I want to stay." REUTERS/Nacho Doce
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Carla, 18, a Venezuelan pregnant woman, poses before she gave birth. Roraima's governor has asked Brazil's Supreme Court to close the border to be able to deal with the immigration crisis. The federal government in Brasilia has ruled that out on humanitarian grounds.  
REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Carla, 18, a Venezuelan pregnant woman, poses before she gave birth. Roraima's governor has asked Brazil's Supreme Court to close the border to be able to deal with the immigration crisis. The federal government in Brasilia has ruled that out on...more

Carla, 18, a Venezuelan pregnant woman, poses before she gave birth. Roraima's governor has asked Brazil's Supreme Court to close the border to be able to deal with the immigration crisis. The federal government in Brasilia has ruled that out on humanitarian grounds. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
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