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Pictures | Thu Aug 16, 2018 | 1:10am BST

Venezuela's taps run dry

Women fill containers with water coming from a mountain, in a road at Plan de Manzano slum in Caracas, Venezuela July 20, 2018. Water cuts are the latest addition to a long list of woes for Venezuelans hurting from a fifth year of an economic crisis that has sparked malnutrition, hyperinflation and emigration. Malfunctions in the capital's water network due to lack of maintenance have taken a turn for the worst in recent months, depriving many in this city of 3 million people of regular running water.

REUTERS/Marco Bello

Women fill containers with water coming from a mountain, in a road at Plan de Manzano slum in Caracas, Venezuela July 20, 2018. Water cuts are the latest addition to a long list of woes for Venezuelans hurting from a fifth year of an economic crisis...more

Women fill containers with water coming from a mountain, in a road at Plan de Manzano slum in Caracas, Venezuela July 20, 2018. Water cuts are the latest addition to a long list of woes for Venezuelans hurting from a fifth year of an economic crisis that has sparked malnutrition, hyperinflation and emigration. Malfunctions in the capital's water network due to lack of maintenance have taken a turn for the worst in recent months, depriving many in this city of 3 million people of regular running water. REUTERS/Marco Bello
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Containers filled with water are seen on the floor next to the bed of a patient at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. At one of Caracas' biggest public hospitals, most bathrooms are closed. Patients fill jugs from a tiny tap on the ground floor that sometimes has a trickle of water. Operations are postponed or canceled. The Central Venezuelan University hospital, once a Latin American leader, is reeling as taps run dry. "I have gone to the operation bloc and opened the tap to wash my hands, as you must do before a surgery, and nothing comes out," said gynecologist Lina Figueria.

REUTERS/Marco Bello

Containers filled with water are seen on the floor next to the bed of a patient at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. At one of Caracas' biggest public hospitals, most bathrooms are closed. Patients fill...more

Containers filled with water are seen on the floor next to the bed of a patient at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. At one of Caracas' biggest public hospitals, most bathrooms are closed. Patients fill jugs from a tiny tap on the ground floor that sometimes has a trickle of water. Operations are postponed or canceled. The Central Venezuelan University hospital, once a Latin American leader, is reeling as taps run dry. "I have gone to the operation bloc and opened the tap to wash my hands, as you must do before a surgery, and nothing comes out," said gynecologist Lina Figueria. REUTERS/Marco Bello
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A bathroom at the gynecology hospitalization area of the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital is seen in Caracas, August 8, 2018. Venezuela's socialist government typically says water cuts are due to sabotage by right-wing "terrorists." Information Minister Jorge Rodriguez in July announced a "special plan" to fix the issues, but did not provide details. The Information Ministry and Hidrocapital did not respond to a request for information.

REUTERS/Marco Bello

A bathroom at the gynecology hospitalization area of the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital is seen in Caracas, August 8, 2018. Venezuela's socialist government typically says water cuts are due to sabotage by right-wing "terrorists."...more

A bathroom at the gynecology hospitalization area of the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital is seen in Caracas, August 8, 2018. Venezuela's socialist government typically says water cuts are due to sabotage by right-wing "terrorists." Information Minister Jorge Rodriguez in July announced a "special plan" to fix the issues, but did not provide details. The Information Ministry and Hidrocapital did not respond to a request for information. REUTERS/Marco Bello
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A sign that reads "There is no water" (top L) is seen at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. Lack of water - and taps that sometimes spurt out brown liquid - have triggered health concerns in a country lacking basic antibiotics and vaccines. About 75 percent of Caracas residents said they do not receive water regularly, according to a survey published by two Venezuelan non-governmental organizations this month.

REUTERS/Marco Bello

A sign that reads "There is no water" (top L) is seen at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. Lack of water - and taps that sometimes spurt out brown liquid - have triggered health concerns in a country...more

A sign that reads "There is no water" (top L) is seen at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. Lack of water - and taps that sometimes spurt out brown liquid - have triggered health concerns in a country lacking basic antibiotics and vaccines. About 75 percent of Caracas residents said they do not receive water regularly, according to a survey published by two Venezuelan non-governmental organizations this month. REUTERS/Marco Bello
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People fill containers with water coming from a mountain, in a road at Plan de Manzano slum in Caracas, July 20, 2018. Around 11 percent said they thought dirty water had caused skin and stomach problems. The survey does not have comparative figures. Medical consequences are hard to gauge as the Health Ministry no longer releases once-weekly data, but doctors say scabies and diarrhea are on the rise.

REUTERS/Marco Bello

People fill containers with water coming from a mountain, in a road at Plan de Manzano slum in Caracas, July 20, 2018. Around 11 percent said they thought dirty water had caused skin and stomach problems. The survey does not have comparative figures....more

People fill containers with water coming from a mountain, in a road at Plan de Manzano slum in Caracas, July 20, 2018. Around 11 percent said they thought dirty water had caused skin and stomach problems. The survey does not have comparative figures. Medical consequences are hard to gauge as the Health Ministry no longer releases once-weekly data, but doctors say scabies and diarrhea are on the rise. REUTERS/Marco Bello
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Containers filled with water are seen at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. Water shortages have also made some basic daily activities untenable. Poor residents say they take fewer showers. In the low-income neighborhood of Catia, university professor Mariangela Gonzalez, 64, has 127 bottles, gas containers and pots clogging the entrance to her house. "When the water comes on, we have to run," said Gonzalez.

REUTERS/Marco Bello

Containers filled with water are seen at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. Water shortages have also made some basic daily activities untenable. Poor residents say they take fewer showers. In the...more

Containers filled with water are seen at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. Water shortages have also made some basic daily activities untenable. Poor residents say they take fewer showers. In the low-income neighborhood of Catia, university professor Mariangela Gonzalez, 64, has 127 bottles, gas containers and pots clogging the entrance to her house. "When the water comes on, we have to run," said Gonzalez. REUTERS/Marco Bello
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Containers filled with water are seen at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Containers filled with water are seen at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Containers filled with water are seen at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello
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Signs that read "Nurses bathroom" (top) and "Obstructed bathroom. Do not use" (bottom R) are seen at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Signs that read "Nurses bathroom" (top) and "Obstructed bathroom. Do not use" (bottom R) are seen at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Signs that read "Nurses bathroom" (top) and "Obstructed bathroom. Do not use" (bottom R) are seen at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello
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Containers filled with water are seen next to the bed of a patient at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Containers filled with water are seen next to the bed of a patient at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

Containers filled with water are seen next to the bed of a patient at the Central University of Venezuela (UCV) hospital in Caracas, August 14, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello
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A woman carries a container filled with water coming from a mountain, in a road at Plan de Manzano slum in Caracas, July 20, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

A woman carries a container filled with water coming from a mountain, in a road at Plan de Manzano slum in Caracas, July 20, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello

A woman carries a container filled with water coming from a mountain, in a road at Plan de Manzano slum in Caracas, July 20, 2018. REUTERS/Marco Bello
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