Edition:
United Kingdom

Harold Evans

 
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Read a recap of a roundtable discussion moderated by Sir Harold Evans and featuring panelists including Mark Stephens, Dr. Therese Coffey, John Prescott, Nick Davies, Roy Greenslade, James Harding, Alan Rusbridger, Rosemary Righter and Mark Thompson on issues of press performance, the law, and press relations.  Live Coverage 

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Murdoch in good times and bad

Sir Harold Evans, the longtime editor of The Sunday Times recalls several decades of Murdoch's exercise of political and media power, all leading to the current crisis at News International.   Full Article 

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Who stands for the public in Murdoch vs the government?

Geoffrey Robertson QC casts a skeptical eye on the prospects for meaningful media regulation in the UK, especially given the failures of past attempts and the low credibility of the UK’s Press Complaints Commission (PCC) in either protecting privacy or enforcing its ethical rulings.  Full Article 

Geoffrey Robertson QC and Sir Harold Evans are pictured in a screengrab. REUTERS/TV

Guardian lawyer calls for tougher privacy laws

Leading human rights lawyer Geoffrey Robertson QC calls for tougher privacy laws and an end to prior restraint, in the wake of the News Corp phone hacking scandal. Ahead of a key debate on ''The Press We Deserve'' with Harold Evans, Reuters editor-at-large, Robertson brands the Press Complaints Commission "toothless".  Video 

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Should Guardian journalists reveal their sources?

The Metropolitan police are seeking a court order to make reporters for the UK newspaper, The Guardian, disclose their sources about the News Corp phone-hacking scandal. Reuters editor-at-large, Harold Evans speaks with Guardian's lawyer Geoffrey Robertson, QC about the latest developments.  Video 

News Corp Scandal: Special Reports

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Rupert Murdoch, a hands-on newspaperman

Former senior Murdoch employees in Britain, Australia and the United States say Murdoch is a hands-on media proprietor, as ready with an opinion on a story as he is to dispose of any editor who regularly takes a different stance from his own.  Full Article 

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Inside Rebekah Brooks's News of the World

"It was the kind of place you get out of and you never want to go back again." That's how one former reporter describes the News of the World newsroom under editor Rebekah Brooks, the ferociously ambitious titian-haired executive who ran Britain's top-selling Sunday tabloid from 2000 to 2003.  Full Article 

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Has Murdoch's bad apple spoiled the barrel?

Long before a phone hacking scandal closed Murdoch's News of the World last week, journalists from The Times, its sister paper the Sunday Times, the Wall Street Journal and even one-time Murdoch target the Financial Times have worried about the influence of the man Britons call the "dirty digger".  Full Article 

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U.S.-China relations