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Central Banks

ECB's Rehn sees euro zone economy weakening

Recent data point to a weakening euro zone economy, the European Central Bank's Olli Rehn told a German newspaper on Sunday, adding that interest rates would remain at the current level until monetary policy goals have been met.

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ECB rate move hinges on downturn's duration: Villeroy

The timing of the European Central Bank's first post-crisis rate hike hinges on whether the euro zone's current slowdown is a blip or a more protracted downturn, ECB policymaker Francois Villeroy de Galhau said in an interview published on Sunday.

ECB's Coeure opens door to new cash boost for banks

European Central Bank board member Benoit Coeure said the ECB was discussing the idea of issuing new multi-year cheap loans to banks, which in some countries face a funding cliff-edge next year when previous loans must be repaid.

Factories to test world's 'delicate equilibrium'

The world economy is caught in a "delicate equilibrium" between stabilisation and a further downturn, according to Bank of England Governor Mark Carney, and that balance could look even shakier over the next few days.

Fed's Powell: Bank consolidation weighing on rural communities

Decades of bank industry consolidation have weighed on the economies of rural areas as branches and local community banks disappeared and access to financial services declined, Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said on Tuesday, citing meetings of Fed staff held last year in communities where banks had closed.

Bank of England's Vlieghe scales back rate hike view

The Bank of England can probably raise interest rates only around once a year, given the weakening of the economy in Britain and around the world, and even that slow pace might be too much, a top policymaker at the central bank said.

Lower gasoline prices restrain U.S. consumer inflation

U.S. consumer prices were unchanged for a third straight month in January, leading to the smallest annual increase in inflation in more than 1-1/2 years, which could allow the Federal Reserve to hold interest rates steady for a while.

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