Canada's Carney wants to help Britain, Europe reform

TORONTO Sun Feb 17, 2013 7:08pm GMT

Bank of Canada Governor Mark Carney prepares to testify before the Commons finance committee on Parliament Hill in Ottawa February 12, 2013. REUTERS/Chris Wattie

Bank of Canada Governor Mark Carney prepares to testify before the Commons finance committee on Parliament Hill in Ottawa February 12, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Chris Wattie

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TORONTO (Reuters) - Canada's outgoing central bank governor, Mark Carney, said he looks forward to bringing an outsider's perspective to the Bank of England, while also helping to spur reform across Europe.

Carney, who will become governor of the Bank of England in July, said he was ready to face a more prying media culture, although he would "prefer" the way Canadian journalists respected personal privacy.

"The value of me going there to the institution is to bring a different perspective," Carney told CTV News in an interview.

Carney said he wanted to help "reform" England's central bank and to think more broadly about Europe "to really get those economies going and fix those financial systems."

The 47-year-old Carney will be the first foreigner to run Britain's central bank in its 318-year history as the country struggles with a weak economy.

Carney took over the Bank of Canada in 2008 and has earned praise for protecting Canada from the worst of the global recession that crippled economies worldwide.

His appointment has already stoked the attention of Britain's tabloids but Carney said he was ready for a more intrusive media.

"I think we have a very mature media culture here that focuses on the right things, focuses on the issues," he said. "And I obviously prefer that, but I recognise that it's a different environment."

Carney ultimately expects to return to Canada after his stint in England.

"This is where my friends are, this is obviously where my family is, and it's just a natural," he said.

(Reporting By Russ Blinch; Editing by Nick Zieminski)

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