Cameron says he will back increase in UK minimum wage

COVENTRY, England Tue Mar 4, 2014 4:21pm GMT

1 of 4. Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron delivers a speech on the economy and apprenticeships, at the Manufacturing Technology Centre, in Coventry, central England March 4, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Joe Giddens/Pool

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COVENTRY, England (Reuters) - Prime Minister David Cameron said on Tuesday he was ready to raise the minimum wage by an above-inflation three percent, in line with a recommendation made by the government's advisers last month.

The Low Pay Commission has said the minimum wage should rise to 6.50 pounds, an increase above the rate of inflation for the first time in more than five years.

"I look forward to accepting this recommendation," Cameron said during a visit to the Midlands city of Coventry. "It means that as we recover from the great recession, hard-working people on the minimum wage - who have suffered during the tough times - can know they will share in the recovery."

Once formally accepted by the government, the rise would take effect in October, around six months before the next general election in 2015 where living standards are likely to be a key issue.

(Reporting by William James; editing by Stephen Addison)

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