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Iowa's caucus tradition heats up

Tuesday, February 02, 2016 - 01:34

Democrats and Republicans at a high school in Des Moines kick-off the Presidential election with a caucus. Gavino Garay reports.

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Here at Lincoln high school, both Democrats and Republicans in Des Moines, Iowa may be in the same building -- but the rooms where the caucuses are kicking off are very different. Democrats have taken over the school's cafeteria, while Republicans are huddled in the auditorium. Iowans are filling similar locations at more than 1,100 schools churches and libraries across the state where they're taking part in a tradition that comes every four years... known as caucusing. The farming state is the first in the United States to begin the process of picking the Republican and Democratic nominees for the November 8 presidential election. On the Democratic side of the aisle, it's a community ritual, where locals rally for candidates and try to convince their neighbor's whom to vote for. If a candidate doesn't get the 15 percent of voters needed to be considered viable, the caucusing continues, and another round begins, and voters forced to choose another contender. Republicans get straight down to business. They privately write their vote on a piece of paper that is later collected by caucus officials. The process could take up to three hours, but ultimately, the task they all have is the same one: to choose the next president of the United States.

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Iowa's caucus tradition heats up

Tuesday, February 02, 2016 - 01:34