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U.S. troops in Afghanistan can strike Taliban more easily, Carter says

Tuesday, July 12, 2016 - 01:05

U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter says the senior U.S commander in Afghanistan will have greater freedom to strike at the Taliban under broad new powers approved last month by President Barack Obama. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

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ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) The senior U.S commander in Afghanistan will have greater freedom to strike at the Taliban under broad new powers approved last month by President Barack Obama, U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter said on Tuesday. Carter, on an unannounced visit to Afghanistan, said the powers granted to General John Nicholson would allow "much more efficient use and effective use of the forces we have here as well as the Afghan forces." "The United States will continue to target and strike terrorist leaders everywhere in the world where they might threaten Americans or interests and our friends. We will continue to do that as we have demonstrated that we do do," Carter said. Nicholson himself said the new broader authorities were being used "almost daily" in support of Afghan forces, pointing to a significant pickup in the pace of U.S. operations, 18 months after the end of the main NATO combat mission. A U.S. military official said the new authorities had been used a couple of dozen times since they were approved by the White House in June. Carter's visit comes days after Obama shelved plans to cut the U.S. force in Afghanistan nearly in half by year's end, opting instead to keep 8,400 troops there through to the end of his presidency in January. Under the authorities previously granted to Nicholson, who commands both the NATO-led Resolute Support mission and a separate U.S. counterterrorism mission, his forces could generally only intervene against the Taliban when Afghan government troops requested emergency assistance. "Previously General Nicholson's (Commander of NATO forces in Afghanistan) authorities were that when or if Afghan security forces found themselves in a difficult situation then they can call the American counterparts and the American counterparts could come and go shoulder to shoulder with them and help. It obviously to me makes a lot more sense to be doing it the way we're doing it now," Carter said. Americans have been backing up Afghan troops fighting Taliban militants in hotly contested southern regions, including Uruzgan and Maiwand in Kandahar province, as well as helping push insurgents back from areas around the northern city of Kunduz. In addition, they were striking Islamic State fighters in the eastern province of Nangarhar. Afghan forces, fighting largely on their own since the NATO-led mission ended most combat operations in 2014, have frequently asked for more combat assistance from their allies, particularly for close air strikes. The Taliban have made major gains and are estimated to control more territory than at any time since they were driven from power by a U.S.-led campaign in 2001. But after a difficult year in 2015, when the insurgents briefly captured Kunduz, Afghan and international officials say government troops have succeeded in stabilising the situation to a large extent. Carter, who met both Ghani and Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah as well as senior U.S. military commanders, said it was "critical" that the national unity government formed after disputed elections in 2014 maintained stability. Ghani thanked the United States as well as other NATO allies who last week pledged to maintain support for Afghanistan. He also praised Afghan forces, who he said had been "standing tall" since the departure of foreign combat forces.

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U.S. troops in Afghanistan can strike Taliban more easily, Carter says

Tuesday, July 12, 2016 - 01:05