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Cycling is clean - Cavendish

Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 00:35

With cyclists' use of drugs through Therapeutic Use Exemptions under the spotlight, top cyclist Mark Cavendish say the issue has been overblown.

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SHOWS: ABU DHABI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (OCTOBER 19, 2016) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) BRITISH CYCLIST, MARK CAVENDISH, SAYING: "I truly believe that cycling is clean I really do. I think that cycling has a murky past and it becomes an easy target when something comes up and I truly believe it's at the forefront of sport for anti-doping…listen if you have sport, if you have entertainment, if you have business, there's going to be people who cheat and cycling was like this in the past and it's going to be an easy target now for people to comment about." STORY: As the sport of cycling has a renewed spotlight focused on it through allegations of doping through medical exemptions, top cyclists say fears of a return to the sport's dark past are overblown. The controversy surrounds the use of illegal substances through medical exemptions - Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs), with critics suggesting some exemptions were granted too easily. British cyclist Mark Cavendish said cycling receives unfair attention on such issues because of its controversial activities in the past. "I truly believe that cycling is clean I really do. I think that cycling has a murky past and it becomes an easy target when something comes up and I truly believe it's at the forefront of sport for anti-doping…listen if you have sport, if you have entertainment, if you have business, there's going to be people who cheat and cycling was like this in the past and it's going to be an easy target now for people to comment about," said Cavendish, the 2011 road race world champion. An investigation by Britain's anti-doping agency (UKAD) is taking place into British cycling after it emerged through a data leak last month that British cyclist Bradley Wiggins was given permission to have legal injections of the banned drug triamcinolone to treat breathing difficulties before the 2011 and 2012 Tour de France and 2013 Tour of Italy. On each occasion the TUE was approved by British authorities and cycling's governing body, the UCI, and there is no suggestion Wiggins broke any rules. This week, International Cycling Union (UCI) president Brian Cookson has said Team Sky may have pushed rules "to the very limit" in the matter of TUEs.

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Cycling is clean - Cavendish

Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 00:35